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Thread: Weaning

  1. #1

    Default Weaning

    Hello. I am a first time mom and have struggled with breastfeeding since day one. My child is now approaching 4 months and after dealing with mastitis, fungal and staph infections it's time to wean. I am having a hard time dealing with the decision to wean as I feel providing my baby with my milk is the best form of nutrition; however due to constant infections I am always fatigued, physically sick and feeling overwhelmed. Need help!

  2. #2

    Default Re: Weaning

    I am sorry you have had so many struggles when it comes to breastfeeding! It can be very trying at times. It sounds to me that you are not completely sure that you want to stop. I would hate for you to stop now and regret it later on. Have you talked to your dr and your ped about all the issues that have come up and the infections?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    18,063

    Default Re: Weaning

    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/concerns/...-mastitis.html

    sorry youve had such a hard time. Anybody could understand why you would want to wean.

    breastfeeding doesn't have to be all or nothing.. and you want to wean slowly. You don't want another bought of plugged ducts or worse.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21,368

    Default Re: Weaning

    with the PPs.

    We'd love to help you either continue to nurse, especially since you sound so reluctant to end the nursing relationship! If there's any issue that you think we could help you troubleshoot, we'll be more than happy to try. No pressure, of course.

    If not, then weaning is a process that is best done s.l.o.w.l.y.! Go too fast and you can end up engorged or with plugged ducts or mastitis, and as bad as nursing may be right now, those things would just make it worse! You want to cut out one feeding and replace it with a bottle of formula, then wait several days and cut out another feeding. This will mimic the natural weaning process of slowly diminishing feedings and diminishing supply, and minimize the chances that you'll end up with additional issues.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,106

    Default Re: Weaning

    I can say that weaning isn't going to help with the fatigue. That comes with having a baby and when you are getting up all hours making bottles it won't get any better.

    The infections...I assume you are talking about mastitis...have you changed bras, nursed on demand, seen a doctor? It could be the same infection that isn't going away. There is a cause for the infections and it is possible to fix it. Maybe you should see an IBCLC.

    It doesn't sound like you really want to wean. You are just getting to the fun part of breastfeeding. Nursing a newborn is work but once they get a little older it becomes less work and more fun.
    Michelle

    Wife to Donnie , my best friend
    Mom to Trenton 1/9/97, Dillan 11/22/01, Ashton 6/19/09

    All boys, weaned at 15 months, at home with Ashton

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Northern Cal.
    Posts
    4,983

    Default Re: Weaning

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*3boysmomma View Post
    You are just getting to the fun part of breastfeeding. Nursing a newborn is work but once they get a little older it becomes less work and more fun.
    I have a lot of problems getting started with breastfeeding - I got mastitis twice, multiple cases of clogged ducts, and I had an endless case of thrush. It was really hard, and I thought about quitting several times. But in general, things started to look up and get better around the four month mark. By six months, breastfeeding was a breeze. So, I agree with PPs - if you really want to wean, we won't stop you, that's your call, but if you do want to continue, we're here to encourage you. You may be about to turn a corner, and you may see things ease up soon. By five or six months, most babies are nursing less frequently, and most moms have far fewer physiological problems.


    You can call me JoMo!

    Mom to baby boy Joe, born 5/4/09 and breastfed for more than two and a half years, and baby girl Maggie, born 7/9/12.

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