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Thread: pacifiers?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    117

    Default pacifiers?

    i read that all of my newborn's 'sucking' should be done at the breast but lately my 1 month old daughter refuses to sleep unless she's sucking.
    the first few nights she did this she would start to fall asleep or be asleep for five minutes or so and once i tried to remove my nipple she would start to suck again and most of the time i can't even hear her swallowing or feel a tug, she's just comfort sucking. a few nights this went on for 2 or more hours!
    so last night i nursed her and comfort nursed her for a long time and then gave her a pacifier, will this effect her nursing at all?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    100

    Default Re: pacifiers?

    It takes about 6-8 weeks for your milk supply to come in and be tailored to DD's demand, so that is why people recommend against using pacifiers until after about 2mo.

    We didn't use one until after 3mo because DS had latch issues and I didn't want to risk supply issues or difficulty learning to latch at the breast. It was hard, because there were times he really cried and cried (like in the car or at night when he would wake as I put him in his bassinet) when I wanted to use a pacifier but did not. That said, when I did start using a pacifier, I noticed that his suck when nursing was much stronger, so I think in some ways it helped his latch/weight gain issues!

    It sounds like you have a good sense of when DD is eating versus comfort sucking. I'd use it only if you really need to at that age, and I would try to use it less during the day, so that DD can focus on eating and building supply when she needs to or has a growth spurt or a cluster-feed. Those times you just need to settle in with a few movies or a good book, a bottle of water and the phone nearby!

    Oh, the AAP now recommends using a pacifer as DB goes to sleep, because it seems to help prevent SIDS. You don't need to put the paci back in if DD spits it out, but the recommendation is another piece of data to help you decide what to do.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    58

    Default Re: pacifiers?

    We used a pacifier from the time my daughter was born... the recommendations from the AAP about the reduction in SIDS risk really influenced my decision, as I was initially against the use of a pacifier. We never had problems with latching on but since we used a pacifier from the beginning, I don't know if it has had any effect on nursing or not. My daughter is now 4 months old and still nurses great at home, takes bottles of EBM during the day while I'm at work, and still takes a pacifier (but not as often now that she can find her fingers - they're much better!). She usually falls asleep with the pacifier but spits it out soon after falling asleep and this doesn't seem to wake her up or bother her.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    222

    Default Re: pacifiers?

    I tried to avoid the pacifier, but my DD is such a strong comfort sucker, I just couldn't stay attached to her 24/7. I started giving it to her for sleep and when I knew she was finished eating, but still just wanted to suck. As she's gotten older (she's almost 9 MOs now) I only let her have it to fall asleep with, and she doesn't fret too much if it falls out. We didn't have any trouble with nipple confusion or anything like that, so it worked out fine for us. I know others will have differing opinions, but I can tell you that i wouldn't have gotten any sleep during the first few months of her life if she didn't have her binkie!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    108

    Default Re: pacifiers?

    I guess since i cosleep i have never had any urge to use a pacifier..i'm there for him at all times. Even just the comfort suck triggers production, at least for me. All Elias has to do is graze the nipple and my milk is flowing. So i won't mess that up with a pacifier. Having enough milk for him is more important to me

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    86

    Default Re: pacifiers?

    pretty soon your baby will find her fingers and hands to suck on. sometimes I let ds suck on his hands when he just wants to comfort suck and I can't accomodate him. Something I heard, though, is that NOT letting babies comfort suck at the breast can lead to early sef-weaning. I hate giving ds a pacifier, and only do when he's in his carseat or we are out shopping or somewhere I really can't let him suckle, and he's crying really loudly. HTH

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    863

    Default Re: pacifiers?

    Babies do have an intense need to suck which can be frusterated to an exhausted new mommy who just wants to rest!!! I think pacifiers have their place, but they can also very easily be abused. It becomes very easy to use one as a habitual substitute for nurturing.

    One thing a newborn has to "learn" is how to suck effectively. Since a baby sucks differently on a pacifier than on Mommy's nipples, some newborns do develop nipple confusion. Some babies do just fine but others don't -- you have to weigh how badly you want a successful breastfeeding experience. If breastfeeding is your ultimate goal, is it worth the risk? Pacifiers can also lead to poor latch on since the baby doesn't have to open his lips as wide.

    However, if your baby has intense sucking needs and breastfeeding is well established (usually about 6 weeks), I can see where a pacifier can come in handy to help an exhausted mommy in addition to human nurturing.

    One thing that you may want to try, and I've seen others post this before, is to guide her fingers or thumb in. It can be easily found in the middle of the night, doesn't fall on the floor, tastes batter, and db can adjust the position to her own sucking needs. Most babies will suck their thumb at some time and most outgrow it. Actually, if their sucking needs are met appropriatly in ealry infancy, they aren't likely to carry thumb-sucking in to early childhood, so you don't need to worry about that.

    Good luck! Keep us posted.
    Kristie L.
    LLL Leader
    (the poster formerly known as fezzik812)
    Wife to Brett, Mommy to Seamus (5.1.05), and Emelie (1.18.08)
    "You must be the change you wish to see in the world."- Ghandi

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    108

    Default Re: pacifiers?

    Great info! My baby satisfies most of his needs to suck with me but there are times when he wants sucking with no milk coming out..he has found his pointer and middle fingers and has begun to suck on those..doesn't last too long though, maybe because it's a new thing..i'm sure he still prefers me as a pacifier and that's totally fine with me

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    65

    Default Re: pacifiers?

    We gave DS a paci when he was about 10 days old. I had overactive let down and any amount of sucking on me would result in him drowning in milk! He was sucking on our fingers a lot too. I figured I would notice if it affected his latch or nursing and that I would take it away right away if I noticed any changes. He was kind of lukewarm about it anyway. He is still nursing like a champ and is 15 months old.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    651

    Default Re: pacifiers?

    Like Brenda, I too cosleep with DS and am loving it. However, like you, I resorted to a pacifier (much to my midwife and doula's dismay) when DS was about two weeks old. He also had a strong desire to suck all day and night and as I first time mom, I started to lose it when he would want to nurse for two hours straight. I finally started to take him off when I could tell he wasn't actively sucking and would give him a pacifier but would continue to cuddle him so we could both drift off to sleep. Anyhow, he never had nipple confusion and has gained weight nicely!
    ~Melanie

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