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Thread: Almost one year supply drop?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    23

    Default Almost one year supply drop?

    I work a four 5 hours shifts a week. In order to maintain the perfect balance of enough milk for my lo while I am gone, I pump every morning and twice during my work shift. I can sometimes put extra in the freezer, but it usually ends up being just the right amount.

    DS is almost one year old, and we have had this work routine for about 6 months. I usually am always able to pump about 3-4 oz per session, but over the past couple weeks , I can get 2 oz max per session. DS is almost a year old, and I was hoping to drop the bottle the pumping while I am working, and just nurse him when we are together, but on my own terms.

    Is it natural to have a supply dip around the one year point? Is my body telling me to stop pumping? Or could there be some outside influence?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21,361

    Default Re: Almost one year supply drop?

    DS is almost a year old, and I was hoping to drop the bottle the pumping while I am working, and just nurse him when we are together, but on my own terms.
    You can do this. But as long as your baby is under a year, breastmilk or formula should make up the majority of his diet. If you're not making enough from nursing and pumping alone, you may need to introduce some formula.

    Is it natural to have a supply dip around the one year point?
    Many moms who pump experience a supply dip at some point. It can be due to any of the following reasons:
    - The pump is getting worn out. Solution to problem may be to replace pump, or get it reconditioned.
    - Mom's body is no longer as responsive to pumping. Solution may be to pump more frequently or use a better pump.
    - Mom's menstrual cycle is returning. Solution may be to pump and nurse more frequently, or just wait it out.
    - Stress.
    - Pregnancy.
    - Baby is no longer nursing as much when mom and baby are together, resulting in lower supply over all.

    Is my body telling me to stop pumping?
    No, I don't think so. Unless you're pregnant, your body is going to do more or less what your head tells it to do, so if you tell it to make more milk (by pumping more or nursing more), it's likely to do what you ask of it. If you tell it to kick back and relax (by maintaining your current regimen or reducing the pumping), it's going to either keep supply the same or let it decrease.
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