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Thread: Any long term EPumpers?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    Question Any long term EPumpers?

    I have a few questions....
    Were you able to have enough milk to feed your LO?
    Once your milk supply was established, how many times a day did you have to pump to maintain it??

    My LO is 6 weeks today and still won't nurse so I think I'm stuck with Exclusively pumping. Currently I'm pumping 11-12 times a day and I know I won't be able to maintain that when I go back to work in a couple of weeks.

    I want to know how many times a day some of you experienced mothers have had to pump at say 3 months, 6 months and longer?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Any long term EPumpers?

    What problems are you having with nursing? Have you seen a IBCLC?

    6 weeks is certainly not too late. I brought a 2 months early baby to be EBF after over 2 months from being in the NICU etc. It's not hopeless.

    With that said, I had to go back to EP'ing after he was 10 months for various reasons, and it is hard. I had a ton of problems with supply. I would suggest to keep pushing toward EBF'ing while you still can. It is much easier mama...it really is.
    I'm Hillary
    Wife to Gualberto
    Mom to Nolan
    Born at 32 weeks-3lbs/10oz
    11-25-2007
    Our precious early angel


    Remember, you are not managing an inconvenience; You are raising a human being ~ Kittie Frantz
    Unthinking respect for authority is the greatest enemy of truth ~ Albert Einstein
    First they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they fight you, then you win ~ Mahatma Gandhi
    Looking for more information about vaccines?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Any long term EPumpers?

    Yes,I've seen a LC and am still trying but don't have much hope at this point as I have flat nipples and she refuses to nurse!

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Any long term EPumpers?

    Have you tried pumping before nursing to help with the flat nipples? You could maybe use a little hand pump at least long enough to draw the nipple out and then get your LO to latch? That might work.

    Here is some more info about nursing with flat nipples from here

    TREATMENTS TO DRAW OUT A FLAT OR INVERTED NIPPLE

    While it's very important to remember that most babies who latch-on well can draw out even an inverted or flat nipple, and that a baby does not "nipple-feed", there are several possible options for treating a flat/inverted nipple that may make latch-on easier for the baby. Some of these treatment measures can be employed before birth and others will want to be delayed until the baby arrives. Still others can be used as treatment options both during pregnancy and after breastfeeding has begun.

    * Breast shells. Breast shells, also referred to as milk cups, breast cups, or breast shields, take advantage of the natural elasticity of the skin during pregnancy by applying gentle, but constant pressure to the areola in an effort to break the adhesions under the skin that prevent the nipple from protruding. The shells are worn inside the bra, which may need to be one size larger than normal to accomodate the shell. Ideally, shells should be worn starting in the third trimester of pregnancy for a few hours each day. As the mother becomes comfortable wearing the shells, she can gradually increase the amount of time she wears them during the day. After the baby is born, these same shells can be worn about 30 minutes prior to each feeding to help draw out the nipple even more. They should NOT be worn at night and any milk collected in them should NOT be saved.

    * Hoffman Technique. Doing this technique several times a day may help loosen the adhesions at the base of the nipple. To employ this technique: place a thumb on each side of the base of the nipple - directly at the base of the nipple, not at the edge of the areola. Push in firmly against your breast tissue while at the same time pulling your thumbs away from each other. By doing this you will be stretching out the nipple and loosening the tightness at the base which will make the nipple move up and outward. This exercise should be repeated 5 times a day, moving the thumbs in a clockwise fashion around the nipple. It can be used during pregnancy and after baby begins breastfeeding.

    * Breastpump. After birth, the use of an effective breastpump can be helpful at drawing out a flat or inverted nipple immediately before breastfeeding to make latch-on easier for the baby. It also can be used at other times following delivery to help further break the adhesions under the skin by pulling the nipple out uniformly from the center.

    * Evert-it Nipple Enhancer. Available through La Leche League, this device helps to draw out the nipple by providing uniform suction similar to that obtained with a breastpump.

    * Nipple stimulation. After birth, if the nipple can be grasped, a mother can roll her nipple between her thumb and index finger for a minute or two and then quickly touch the nipple with a moist, cold cloth or ice wrapped in cloth (avoid prolonged use of ice as it can inhibit the letdown reflex and numb the nipple too much).

    * Pulling back on the breast tissue at latch-on. As you support your breast for latch-on with thumb on top and four fingers underneath and way back against the chest wall, pull slightly back on the breast tissue toward the chest wall to help the nipple protrude.

    * Nipple shield. ONLY TO BE USED AS A LAST RESORT, the nipple shield is a flexible nipple made out of silicone that is placed over the mother's nipple during feedings so that latch-on is possible for the baby. To prevent the baby from becoming too addicted to nursing with the shield, it should be removed as soon as the baby is latched-on and nursing well. The length of time during the feeding that the shield is used should also be steadily decreased. Possible problems associated with the use of nipples shields include a drop in the mother's milk supply and insufficient transfer of milk to the baby. Because of these possible risks, it is strongly recommended that you only use a nipple shield under the direct supervision of a lactation expert such as as a lactation consultant or La Leche League leader. It should be noted, however, that even with the possible risks of using a nipple shield, as long as the mother is aware of what to watch for, breastfeeding with a nipple shield is much more preferable to not breastfeeding!
    and some more info here too.
    I'm Hillary
    Wife to Gualberto
    Mom to Nolan
    Born at 32 weeks-3lbs/10oz
    11-25-2007
    Our precious early angel


    Remember, you are not managing an inconvenience; You are raising a human being ~ Kittie Frantz
    Unthinking respect for authority is the greatest enemy of truth ~ Albert Einstein
    First they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they fight you, then you win ~ Mahatma Gandhi
    Looking for more information about vaccines?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    2,570

    Default Re: Any long term EPumpers?

    I think that it is wonderful that you are willing to pump to give your LO the best start possible and even already thinking about extended pumping. I do however, think it's very early to "throw in the towel" on nursing, though I'm sure it's been a very hard first few weeks for you guys Is the LC you've been seeing a licenced IBCLC lactation consultant? Also, have you gotten in touch with your local LLL leader? This is not to make you feel more pressure, get your hopes up, or anything, there is absolutely nothing wrong with expressing and bottle feeding. It's just not very fun or easy (as I'm sure you know). I think it's, based on your post that you would want to nurse your baby and we all here want that for you too

    If I were in your shoes, along with getting in touch with my LLL leader, I would keep pumping, but try once or twice a day to latch baby on...maybe just as baby is waking up, or by taking a bath together. Do TONS of skin to skin when just hanging around the house. You may be surprised as baby gets older how she may just get it. I have flat nipples also, and with my first I used a nipple shield for 6 months! I never thought I would be able to wean her from it, and we did, pretty easily actually. Just an example that they actually can figure things out better as they get older.

    Have you tried a nipple shield? I'm assuming your LC has suggested that...


    Jeanne (my middle name IRL)


    Mommy to two girls (M & M), born Sept. '07 and Sept. '09

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    736

    Default Re: Any long term EPumpers?

    I believe I pumped about every 2-3 hours when I started and was at home (I was at home 6 weeks due to C-Section).

    Basically I would feed the little one, put her in the swing while I pumped for 15-20 minutes and by then she'd usually pass out. I'd then put her to bed and repeat the process after about 2-3 hours.

    When I went back to work, I pumped about the same; it turned out to be 2-3 times while I was at work. Then I moved and started a different job. Despite them saying they were ok with my schedule, they changed their mind when I got there and I was only allowed to pump at 12 noon and 3:15. I pumped before I went to work at around 6am, as soon as I got home at around 6pm, and once before bed at around 11pm.

    It sucked. A LOT. However, I did that from when she was 4 months old until I stopped at 18 months old (cutting back on pumping sessions at work so that I could actually enjoy my food / break) and had no issues with supply.

    However, I was able to pump an unusually large amount of milk at every pumping session, so I'm not sure I'm very representative of the avg woman.
    Momma to K 05/24/07 (due 05/31/07)
    Momma to I, 06/04/10 VBAC'd (due 05/31/10). Read about it here

    Exclusive Pumper to first for 18 months.
    I got my VBAC!

    Struggling with nursing but one way or another breast milk is all they get.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    62

    Default Re: Any long term EPumpers?

    I pump 7 times a day (cut back to that at 6 months) and am able to keep up with demand that way, but I think it really varies per your storage capacity/hormones etc. I agree with the other posters, please do not give up on EBF yet, it would be so much easier!
    Hannah Aug 17/2009 (5pd15oz) Hyperemesis & Preeclampsia

    Still almost exclusively Just hanging on to our one per day!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    179

    Default Re: Any long term EPumpers?

    I have pumped for 4 months. The first month was the worst, pumping every 2 hours and I did that up until a month ago, when I realize I wasnt going to have enough room in the frez. I now pump every three hours during the day, 5.30 am, 9 am, noon, 3 pm 6.30pm and then one more time as late as I can stay up. I think it would have to do with the amount of milk you pump at a time, if you need more to feed your LO, then you may have to pump more often. A good idea for your job is to pump every three hours and while at home you can pump more often to keep up with demand.

    Good luck and keep strong, EP is very hard, but well worth it.
    My little surprise born 2 December 2009 7 lbs 1 oz 20 inches.

    Our goal is 1 year, but I'm willing to go 2!

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