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Thread: seeking EBF advice: skinny baby refusing solids

  1. #11
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    Feb 2006
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    Default Re: seeking EBF advice: skinny baby refusing solids

    Is your doctor suggesting ice cream because he thinks she'll eat it more readily? And the butter soaked cheerios sounds bizarre to me!

    I understand the wanting to get her to eat but your ped should have suggested healthier fats and foods. I'm guessing you've tried things like avacados, etc.

    I'm sure she's fine, just inherited your body type.

  2. #12
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    Feb 2006
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    Default Re: seeking EBF advice: skinny baby refusing solids

    I should have read the entire thread before posting. Will she drink ebm from a cup while you are gone at work?

  3. #13
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    Jan 2006
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    17

    Default Re: seeking EBF advice: skinny baby refusing solids

    If she looks healthy to you, and your "gut" reaction is she is fine, then it sounds like she will do what she is supposed to. From your list of foods she will eat, it sounds like she doesn't like dairy - and she knows her own body best if she is not forced foods. The asthma in the family also makes me think dairy, and possibly gluten/wheat. Will she drink rice milk? It tastes closer to breastmilk than soy milk, though not as many calories. And will she eat nuts/nut butters? My day care child is 23 pounds at 2 1/2 years old, and her dr has been concerned for a long time too. But she looks fine, eats solids, not sure if she is still nursing when she is with mom, and the dr is finally feeling better I guess. In the long run, it is probably best, as she will not have to deal with obesity!

  4. #14
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    Feb 2006
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    Default Re: seeking EBF advice: skinny baby refusing solids

    Thank you again for all your advice!

    Ava's pediatrician suggested the ice cream/chocolate/buttered cheerios diet out of concern for Ava's neurological/brain development. Cholesterol at this age is critical for proper myelination of neurons in her brain - so if we want her to get as smart as nature and her genetic make-up allows, she needs to have an adequate supply of cholesterol in her diet. That's why babies are recommended to drink whole milk, too, during their second year, rather than reduced fat milk. Plus, the calcium is important at this stage. The pediatrician also said that she needs fruits and veggies, but she was more concerned about the fats. For iron, she gave me a referral to the hospital to see a pediatric phlebotomist to have a whole blood-workup done. I didn't have the heart to go - plus I think it's overkill. We'll do a pin-prick iron test at her next appointment in 10 days.

    I agree, Ava seems not to like dairy. She won't eat yogurt either. I wonder if it is just a taste preference or an innate concern for food allergies. I consume quite a bit of dairy, mostly in the form of cheese, so she definitely gets some of the potential allergens through the breast milk. Doesn't seem to bother her. My husband and I get into the dairy vs. no dairy discussion. He only eats cultured milk products and is of the opinion that it is unnatural for us to consume other animals' milk. I am of the opinion that, as a species, we have been consuming other animals' milk for a longer time than soy or rice milk, so how bad can it be? Plus, some kids react to soy ... Anyways, I digress :-)
    I don't think Ava has a wheat/gluten sensitivity. She likes to gum toasted bread when she is teething and she eats crumbs here and there. Does not seem to bother her.

    I'll pick up some chewable vitamins for her today - let's see if she'll go for those.

    Also, I stopped pumping before I go to work, because it doesn't seem worth the effort, she drinks so little of it. Plus, my breasts got quite irritated when I did it. Since Ava nurses frequently all day, I don't get engorged and in order to get enough milk with the pump, I have to turn the suction to max. It doesn't feel good to do this for 10+ minutes at a stretch. So, I just try to "tank her up" right before I leave.

    BTW, last night she actually ate 4 bites of broccoli and a quarter pierogi - we were ecstatic!!!
    Last edited by Heike; February 20th, 2006 at 02:51 PM.

  5. #15
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    Feb 2006
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    39

    Default Re: seeking EBF advice: skinny baby refusing solids

    Breastmilk has cholesterol, and all the "good" fats. It has more fats than any solids you can find. Breastfed babies do not follow the same growth pattern as ff babies. They tend to grow faster in the first 6 months (thus being higher on a percentile chart), and then slow down for the second 6 months (thus "falling" on the percentile charts). This is a very normal growth pattern.

    I have two friends who have "struggled" with babies who somehow don't measure up to some chart. My college roommate's daughter LOVED solids, and ate like a horse, but there were still all these concerns about her weight. But, if you look at pictures of her mother as a child, you will see that she was TINY, maybe 100 pounds when she graduated from high school. Her 2-year-old dd is still small, but actually now weighs MORE than my ds. (Luckily I have a doc who is well-educated on bf and doesn't freak out just because he falls off a curve on the chart.)

    My friend from high school was so concerned because her daughter was "only" in the tenth percentile, and kept worrying about her weight. I finally went to see her, and this petite baby had ROLLS OF FAT on her legs. I had to laugh, because my long and thin ds never had rolls.

    I have another friend whose daughter did not get any solids until she was about 14-16 months old (food allergies in the family), who is a little chunk. A baby's growth pattern has very little to do with what solids they eat when, and a lot more to do with their genetic makeup.

    Here are some resources (not LLL sites, but useful info) about growth charts.

    http://www.kellymom.com/babyconcerns...wthcharts.html
    http://www.kellymom.com/babyconcerns...owthchart.html

  6. #16
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    Feb 2006
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    58

    Default Re: seeking EBF advice: skinny baby refusing solids

    Thanks for the link to the growth charts - there definitely is a difference between the two sets of data (bf vs. other). Ava is way below the bf-curve, too, though. But you are right, the mother's weight and genetic make-up needs to be factored in and it never is. They should have a chart of (infant weight/mother's avg. pre-pregnancy weight) to see where this leaves us (probably all over the map <lol>).

    I think one source for the concern is that there seems to be a believe within the pediatric profession that the quality of the breastmilk deteriorates after 1 year and that it is subsequently no longer nutritionally adequate as sole nourishment for the child. I think that's why the pediatrician in our case voiced the concern about fats - i.e. that Ava would not get enough fat through the breast milk any longer. I wonder what this believe is based on. Where there ever any studies that analyzed the nutrient content of breast milk at various stages, including past the first year? I am sure that formula manufacturers did such analyses so that they'd know what to mix into their cocktails, but my suspicion is that these studies where not published and did not extend past the first year. I have not been able to find anything at least, but maybe I didn't look in the right spot. Has anyone seen any such studies anywhere?

  7. #17
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    Feb 2006
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    39

    Default Re: seeking EBF advice: skinny baby refusing solids

    Here's some info I found from the WHO about those growth charts. They're currently working on revising them to better reflect the growth of breastfed babies.

    http://www.who.int/nutrition/publica...hildgrowth/en/

    Here's some info from kellymom about the nutritional content of bm after the first year.

    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/bfextended/ebf-benefits.html

    Good luck on your new ped search!

  8. #18
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    Feb 2006
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    Default Re: seeking EBF advice: skinny baby refusing solids

    The WHO and kellymom links are great - just what I was looking for. Thank you!
    I'll need to spend some time with those ...
    Last edited by Heike; February 21st, 2006 at 11:57 PM.

  9. #19
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    Feb 2006
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    Default Re: seeking EBF advice: skinny baby refusing solids

    Quote Originally Posted by Heike
    ...I think one source for the concern is that there seems to be a believe within the pediatric profession that the quality of the breastmilk deteriorates after 1 year and that it is subsequently no longer nutritionally adequate as sole nourishment for the child.

    I've seen this statement before, and it makes me nuts, because it is such a completely backwards reading of statistical data.

    Breastmilk is breastmilk is breastmilk. Relatively little changes in its composition, even from premie-stage milk all the way through to toddlerhood. The only significant difference between the milk you make for your infant and the milk you make for your toddler is that the toddler-stage milk tends to have even MORE antibodies in it ... and this is logical, because toddlers are getting exposed to more germs through their newfound mobility and explorations, and as they nurse, they expose YOU, so that your own immune system is triggered to produce a wider range of antibodies. It all makes perfect sense.

    Nutritionally speaking, however -- breastmilk is breastmilk. Fat, protein, calories, etc. -- it doesn't change, ounce for ounce, regardless of how old your nursling is.

    So where do the docs come up with the idea that breastmilk becomes less nutritious after 1 year of age? Here's the reasoning: Most children are eating solid foods by 1 year of age. Typically, as they increase their solids intake, the proportion of breastmilk in their overall intake decreases. So you can say, accurately, that breastmilk provides less and less of a growing child's nutrition -- but only if that child is eating more and more solids.

    It is completely inaccurate and misleading to say that the breastmilk itself somehow changes to be less nutritious, ounce for ounce.

    --Rebecca

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    110

    Default Re: seeking EBF advice: skinny baby refusing solids

    Hi there,

    I am new here so pardon me if I step on any feet, but...I am in the same "boat" so to speak!

    My son is 2 (27 1/2 months) and is currently 24 pounds. VERY skinny and little, to the point that people think he is a year old or LESS in age, when they ask.

    He is well below any growth chart, and is currently nursing for at least 70-80% of his daily intake...he nurses ALL night long still, from 1 AM till at least 8 AM, and also nurses anywhere from 4-8 times a day.

    His food intake is limited, though we do offer foods consistantly though out the day, he most of the time refuses, though does "pick" at foods. Another thing is that one day he will LOVE LOVE LOVE something (like mac and cheese) then the next 3 weeks refuse it 100%. Its hard to understand him LOL, typical 2 year old in part I know!

    He also has other issues, in he is still not talking (not at all) and has some texture issues as well. (might be part of the eating thing).

    My son curretnly sees a nutritionest, once a month, whom I dont really like...she too suggested adding a "fat" source to everything he eats, and having him dip his pretzels in butter (ICKY)...but she weighs him and trys to make sure he is staying on track, though last time she came she was VERY upset to see he had been gaining 8 grams a day and was for the last month down to just 5.

    He also sees a speech theripest (whom I dont care much for), she helps him with talking but also eating...and he also see's an OT...both of those are once a week.

    Anyway, I just wanted to tell you YOUR NOT ALONE....when I first got into this, and people kept saying things to me about him not eating and being SOOOOOOOO skinny, I took it soo personally, I actually did tons of research on the topic, and wrote several articles on it....your breastmilk really IS and continues to be the best for them, EVEN at the older age!!!


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