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Thread: Nipple Confusion and Mommy Heartache

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    718

    Default Re: Nipple Confusion and Mommy Heartache

    I`m sorry to hear that you are still struggling w/ bf. My son also had nipple confusion at the beginning and I was aways stressed out and felt guilty about it. I did what Jen is suggesting: Stripped to the waist and baby to diaper, I put him on my stomach. It was such a great bonding time and things started to get better after.It`s been seven weeks and my son`s hobby is to nurse

    Mommy to a busy toddler

    "He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep in order to gain that which he cannot lose."
    Jim Elliot

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    29

    Default Re: Nipple Confusion and Mommy Heartache

    Quote Originally Posted by meghalifax View Post
    he started losing weight and the nurses pretty much said I had to give him formula or risk his health
    This happened to my cousin with ehr son back in July. He was born happy and healthy but for some reason he would not keep all of the breast milk down. So, the nurses pretty much forced formula on the baby because he may loose wieght.

    Don't babies lose weight in the first week anyway?

    How long can an infant wait to be fed after delivery?

    How much weight loss is dangerous?

    This is the forth instance I have heard of nurses caliming wieght loss as an excuse to force formula on a baby

  3. #13

    Default Re: Nipple Confusion and Mommy Heartache

    Don't babies lose weight in the first week anyway?
    Not so much the first week, as the first 24-48 hours. Most of this is fluid weight, especially if mom is/was swollen or had interventions during pregnancy (such as epidural or induction). By day 3, baby's weight should be stable or rising.

    How long can an infant wait to be fed after delivery?
    Ideally a baby should be put to the breast within the first 1-2 hours after birth. This is the time when baby is most alert and willing to feed.
    As far as how long can the baby go without being fed? Well, this depends on the baby.

    How much weight loss is dangerous?
    More than 10%, or if the weight is still on a downward trend on day 3 of life.

    HTH
    Jen
    "Mothers are designed to be available to their babies--to help them make the transition into this big, wide world. To teach them to trust, and love, and feel good about being alive."
    --Elizabeth N. Baldwin, Esq., So I Nursed Him Every 45 Minutes

    Click here to find your local LLL Group
    How to tell if your breastfed baby is getting enough milk!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Nipple Confusion and Mommy Heartache

    Good news! On Thursday my son started to breastfeed. Now that's all he wants to do! And it hurts a lot for the first few sucks, then it's ok. I am trying to see my public health nurse to help with the latch. Has anyone else had this problem when the baby first gets on? Does it get better?

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    63

    Default Re: Nipple Confusion and Mommy Heartache

    Hi, just to let you know I can totally relate. But just be patient and give yourself a break. I had an emergency c-section and have a big baby as well. I was tired too. You have to give yourself a break. He will get the hang of it. Just keep at it and don't get discouraged. Pump your milk and you can give him that as well. Some good positions to hold a big baby are the football hold and the cross cradle hold. The latter worked well for me. I also used a boppy pillow to support him. Also see if you can contact a lactation consultant in your area. They were very helpful to me. If I can think of anything else I will let you know. Hang in there, and yes the latching on part will get better, because he will become a pro at it.
    Angela.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    109

    Smile Re: Nipple Confusion and Mommy Heartache

    Quote Originally Posted by meghalifax View Post
    I have a five day old son who I am trying very hard to breastfeed. I started from the recovery room following my C-section and things have been going down hill since. He's a big baby and while waiting for my milk to come in, he started losing weight and the nurses pretty much said I had to give him formula or risk his health. The day after having an operation and being overwhelmed and tired, I did what they told me. Now I really regret it. We did have some sessions where he latched very well and worked hard at the breast but now my son prefers the bottle over me. Whenever I bring him to the breast he screams. I might be able to get him to stay on for one or two sucks, but after that there is a lot of crying. I am pumping and try him at the breast every time I feed, but no luck. Also, he is a very strong sleeper and we have to work to wake him before feeding, which usually leaves him in a poor mood to start with. Is there any hope that with some work he'll learn to settle down and breastfeed?
    I suggest scheduling a meeting with your local LLL AND with a lactation consultant who can watch you feed him and help you teach him how to latch better. Once he masters his latch he will love it. But you know what? Even if I am wrong and he does not, don't be hard on yourself for it. Every baby is different. It is very commendable that you're pumping and giving him breastmilk in a bottle. It's good for both him AND you to do this. At worst case scenario, don't stop pumping!

  7. #17

    Default Re: Nipple Confusion and Mommy Heartache

    Quote Originally Posted by meghalifax View Post
    Good news! On Thursday my son started to breastfeed. Now that's all he wants to do! And it hurts a lot for the first few sucks, then it's ok. I am trying to see my public health nurse to help with the latch. Has anyone else had this problem when the baby first gets on? Does it get better?
    Excellent! Many new nursing mothers find that they have a bit of pain for the first 15-30 seconds and then it goes away (and stops altogether at about 2 weeks or so). Some theorize that this is because the tissue there isn't used to be stretched the way it is with breastfeeding--you'd be amazed at how those nipples can stretch

    Keep us posted!
    Jen
    "Mothers are designed to be available to their babies--to help them make the transition into this big, wide world. To teach them to trust, and love, and feel good about being alive."
    --Elizabeth N. Baldwin, Esq., So I Nursed Him Every 45 Minutes

    Click here to find your local LLL Group
    How to tell if your breastfed baby is getting enough milk!

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