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Thread: prolactinoma and breast feeding

  1. #1

    Thumbs down prolactinoma and breast feeding

    does anyone know if this is why i have such a large milk supply? My son is 3 weeks old, will the engorgement eventually slow down? I feed him every 3 hours on altenaing breasts. I just want to make sure hes getting enough hind milk.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    20,782

    Default Re: prolactinoma and breast feeding

    Your baby is only 3 weeks old, so some degree of engorgement is still normal and not an indication of disease. When you first start nursing, your body doesn't know how much to make, because it doesn't know how many babies you have. It could be triplets! But making so much extra milk isn't a good idea, because a) it's a waste of energy and b) it puts you at higher risk for conditions like plugged ducts and mastitis. So eventually the body figures this out and ratchets supply back to meet demand pretty exactly, without a lot of extra milk left over. Every time the baby leaves a lot of milk in the breast, the body gets the message that it made too much, and it produces slightly less the next time.

    Sometimes new moms think that they always need to empty the breast, and they get into the bad habit of pumping after nursing even when making too much milk. If you're pumping, now is a good time to cut it out of your routine.

    You can cope with engorgement in the following ways:
    - Wear cold clean cabbage leaves in your bra (cabbage has a chemical compound that is supposed to reduce engorgement)
    - Ice packs can reduce discomfort and the cold may help decrease supply
    - If you are uncomfortable, express the minimum amount of milk needed to reduce discomfort, but no more.
    - Block feeding: feeding only on one breast per feeding. Some moms need to use the same breast for several feedings in a row for several days before they see improvement in their oversupply situation. This should be a last resort, as block feeding is designed to reduce supply, and you don't want to go too far with it.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
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  3. #3

    Default Re: prolactinoma and breast feeding

    Have you been diagnosed with a prolactinoma, or do you suspect due to a large milk supply? If you know you have this, it could be that your excessive milk supply will not "become normal" until it is successfully treated. Some physicians may consider surgery, others may consider hormone treatment.

    If you have been diagnosed and are awaiting treatment, continue to keep yourself comfortable and try to not allow your breasts to get overful - that can cause damage.

    If you have not been diagnosed, and are just overwhelmed with milk, one more option may be helpful. Using a pump, and hand expression, empty both breasts completely and basically start over. It may sound counterproductive to empty, rather than express to comfort, but this helps in many cases.

  4. #4

    Default Re: prolactinoma and breast feeding

    I do have a diagnosed pituitary prolactinoma or micro adenoma, I was on a medicine called bromocriptine before i got pregnant to stop the production of breast milk. I just want to make sure that my supply will reglate the same way it does for most women for me. I can't take broocriptine until i am done breast feeding as it will dry up my milk supply.

  5. #5

    Default Re: prolactinoma and breast feeding

    A positive diagnosis is a horse of a different color! A knowledgeable endocrinologist is a good start. Dr. Hale in Medications and Mothers Milk states that bromocriptine is a milk suppressive, and rates the risk as L5 (very high risk for problems). An alternative for hyperprolactinemia is cabergoline/Dostinex, which in some cases can down-regulate prolactin but not suppress lactation. It is listed as an L4, which is a high risk, but lower than L5. Used with careful medical attention, it may be an alternative.

    I suspect you will have continued high milk supply, despite efforts to down-regulate. Maintaining vigilance to your condition is important. Preventing your breasts from getting overful is important, expressing to comfort and block feedings, as mentioned before, can be helpful. Keeping an eye on possible blocked milk ducts and preventing mastitis.

    On the plus side, if you find you continually have "too much" milk, milk banks are always looking for donors. Just make sure to take care of yourself, whichever path you choose.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Default Re: prolactinoma and breast feeding

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*LLLsamiam View Post
    A positive diagnosis is a horse of a different color! A knowledgeable endocrinologist is a good start. Dr. Hale in Medications and Mothers Milk states that bromocriptine is a milk suppressive, and rates the risk as L5 (very high risk for problems). An alternative for hyperprolactinemia is cabergoline/Dostinex, which in some cases can down-regulate prolactin but not suppress lactation. It is listed as an L4, which is a high risk, but lower than L5. Used with careful medical attention, it may be an alternative.

    I suspect you will have continued high milk supply, despite efforts to down-regulate. Maintaining vigilance to your condition is important. Preventing your breasts from getting overful is important, expressing to comfort and block feedings, as mentioned before, can be helpful. Keeping an eye on possible blocked milk ducts and preventing mastitis.

    On the plus side, if you find you continually have "too much" milk, milk banks are always looking for donors. Just make sure to take care of yourself, whichever path you choose.
    I was thinking donation too, your "curse" could well be a blessing to many, many babies and mothers

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