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Thread: Exclusively pumping ... questions

  1. #1

    Default Exclusively pumping ... questions

    Hi. I am new to the boards. I have a 5 week old DD. After many months of fertility treatments, she arrived on July 10.

    I tried to BF, but my DD kept falling asleep and I was worried she wasn't getting enough to eat. So I started supplementing with similac. Instead of nursing, I pump every three hours during the day.

    I usually get about 3 ounces on each breast in the morning and about 1 to 1.5 ounces one each throughout the day. I am wondering if this amount is normal.

    I also heard that once my baby starts eating more, if I am only pumping (not actually nursing) I will not be able to make enough to meet her feeding demands. Is this true?

    Finally, if I wanted to try to BF again now that my DD is a little older and more alert during feedings, is this possible?

    Thanks,
    Shelby

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    2,242

    Default Re: Exclusively pumping ... questions

    That sounds about normal output for how old our lo is.

    Here is a great link about getting baby back to the breast.

    Have you considered contacting your local LLL leader or a board certified lactation consultant?

    You can still do this mamma, and you have come to the right place for help.


    I'm Laura, mamma of 2

    5-27-06

    8-30-08

    We love and

    We have been nursing for over 2 years now!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    2,552

    Default Re: Exclusively pumping ... questions

    I would try to bring her back to the breast, I know there are mommas on here who have done it. Pumping is hard work and it can be a battle to keep up your supply, and your baby nursing will do much better for your supply. I'm sure some mommies will chime in. Have you been to a local LLL meeting?
    Beth

    Exclusively pumped for Lance Oct 07
    Nursed until just before he turned 3 Levi Oct 09

    Do you have extra milk? Consider donating!
    http://www.hmbana.org/:

    "So I was welcomed by the consolations of human milk; but it was not my mother or my nurses who made any decision to fill their breasts, but you who through them gave me infant food, in accordance with your ordinance and the riches which are distributed deep in the natural order." -St Augustine

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Exclusively pumping ... questions

    While you work on getting your LO back on the breast, you may want to try increasing how many times a day you pump. I exclusively pump and can get aobut 7-9 oz per pump session. Everyone is different, but what worked for me in the beginning was to pump more frequently - I used to do every 2 hours and now that my supply is up I can stretch it out to 4 and get a good amount.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    20,955

    Default Re: Exclusively pumping ... questions

    I usually get about 3 ounces on each breast in the morning and about 1 to 1.5 ounces one each throughout the day. I am wondering if this amount is normal.
    It's not bad, but it's not fabulous either. I'd put your supply in the "could be better" category. My understanding is that a mom with a good supply should be supplying around 2 oz every time her month-old baby eats. And since most breastfed babies eat every 1.3-3 hours, your supply sounds like it's on the low end.

    Some things you can do to boost supply include:
    - See a lactation consultant, preferably an IBCLC.
    - Pump more frequently. The more you pump, the more you will make.
    - Use the best available pump, which often means a hospital-grade rental pump.
    - Make sure you have the proper size of breastshields (your LC can help).
    - Herbs- Fenugreek, Blessed Thistle, and oatmeal are all useful for increasing supply.
    - Drugs- Reglan (available in the US) and Domperidone (Canada) are anti-nausea drugs which can increase milk supply as a side-effect. Both have additional side-effects, and are not right for every mom, so discuss use of either drug with your LC and your doctor or midwife.

    I also heard that once my baby starts eating more, if I am only pumping (not actually nursing) I will not be able to make enough to meet her feeding demands. Is this true?
    Possibly. It is often harder to increase your supply by pumping than by nursing. A nursing baby boosts her mom's supply every time she goes through a growth spurt, which usually means that she nurses nonstop for a few days. Mimicking the frequent stimulation and ultra-thorough milk removal of a growth-spurt using a pump is a difficult task, especially when you need to care for your baby at the same time.

    Finally, if I wanted to try to BF again now that my DD is a little older and more alert during feedings, is this possible?
    Absolutely! Here are some things you can to to increase the likelihood that your baby will go back to the breast:
    - Start as soon as possible.
    - See an IBCLC. Nothing beats hands-on help!
    - Do lots of skin-to-skin contact.
    - Before attempting to latch baby on, express or drip a few drops of milk onto the nipple. The taste of immediate gratification may prompt longer sucking.
    - If you're not co-sleeping, consider trying it. Many babies who will fight the breast during the day will latch on at night when they are too sleepy and relaxed to put up a fuss.
    - When bottle-feeding, use the slowest-flow nipples available, and make bottle-feeding as much like breastfeeding as possible. When it's time to bottle-feed, open your shirt, cuddle your baby close to your bare chest, and tickle her lips with the bottle nipple until she opens wide. (Don't let her learn sloppy latch habits from getting a bottle slipped into a half-open mouth.) Try to pause after every oz or so of fluid, to get the baby accustomed to the natural ebb-and-flow rhythm of breastfeeding.
    - Consider using a supplemental nursing system so that your baby gets used to getting all her meals at the breast. With a SNS, you can ditch the bottles and help eliminate the risk of baby coming to prefer bottles.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

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