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Thread: Solids and extended feeding Q

  1. #1

    Default Solids and extended feeding Q

    If I am planning to BF beyond a year do I still introduce solids at 6 months?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    4,007

    Default Re: Solids and extended feeding Q

    you certainly can . I'm on month 17 and we introduced at 6 months No end in sight here. Just make sure that breastmilk makes up the bulk of your baby's diet. According to kellymom:
    Some toddlers are eating very few solids, or even no solids, at 12 months. This is not unusual and really depends on your child - there is quite a big variation. We like to see breastmilk making up the majority (around 75%) of baby's diet at 12 months. Some babies will be taking more solids by 12 months, but others will still be exclusively or almost-exclusively breastfed at this point. It is normal for baby to keep breastmilk as the primary part of his diet up until 18 months or even longer. An example of a nice gradual increase in solids would be 25% solids at 12 months, 50% solids at 18 months, and 80% solids at 24 months.
    ~Jenn~


    mother of 2 boys!
    08/14/98~~03/20/08

    Birth: 7lbs 12oz, 1 year: 22lbs 11oz
    until he self-weaned 4 days before his third birthday ... still on occasion ... and happily

    ************************************************** ************************************************** *****************
    People need to understand that when they're deciding between breastmilk and formula, they're not deciding between Coke and Pepsi.... They're choosing between a live, pure substance and a dead substance made with the cheapest oils available. ~Chele Marmet

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    miles from nowhere
    Posts
    11,107

    Default Re: Solids and extended feeding Q

    We did with my DD and nursed until she was 2. I'd look for signs of readiness rather than just watching the calendar, though.

    Signs that indicate baby is developmentally ready for solids include:

    * Baby can sit up well without support.
    * Baby has lost the tongue-thrust reflex and does not automatically push solids out of his mouth with his tongue.
    * Baby is ready and willing to chew.
    * Baby is developing a “pincer” grasp, where he picks up food or other objects between thumb and forefinger. Using the fingers and scraping the food into the palm of the hand (palmar grasp) does not substitute for pincer grasp development.
    * Baby is eager to participate in mealtime and may try to grab food and put it in his mouth.
    “We are not put on earth for ourselves, but are placed here for each other. If you are there always for others, then in time of need, someone will be there for you.”
    --Anonymous

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