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Thread: Should I re-lactate my happy baby?

  1. #1

    Default Should I re-lactate my happy baby?

    Due to various issues at the hospital after the birth of my son, I had problems with breastfeeding him. He went from 0 to "starving" in moments, and would scream his head off, making latching on very hard. Also, my milkflow was very slow getting started, and he was supplemented with formula. At one point, if this was due to the formula, or the nurses literally shoving my nipple in his mouth, he refused to take my breasts. I tried for a few days to just have him laying on my bare chest to get him to accept the breast, which he eventually did. However, he still went from 0 to "starving", making it hard to predict when to feed him, and my nipples were very sore at this point, so I could not have him at the breast constantly. I felt horribly guilty and frustrated, because I could not feed my son properly. I eventually lost my milk for a few days because of this. And I still feel the guilt. My husband eventually prepared a bottle of formula, fed him, and he seemed much happier.

    However, he just turned 8 weeks today and he is a much calmer child than he was. He also has a "schedule", which would be easier to follow than when he was born. However, that is also where my questions lie... I have a happy, content child, who sleeps well and eats well. I, ofcourse, have no issues with my breasts. However, I still feel guilty about not breastfeeding him and I have a strong urge, not related to guilt, to breastfeed him. I know he takes the breast, as I tried it a few weeks back. But, I'm wondering is it worth putting him through the stress of re-lactating, when he is so content now?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    N. TX
    Posts
    1,231

    Default Re: Should I re-lactate my happy baby?

    I would!! Even if just to save some $$ and help his immunity as he grows up. I would hate to see you have guilt for the rest of your life for NOT trying, and it can't really hurt. If you try for a few weeks and it doesn't stick, at least you know you tried and he won't ever remember the "stress."

    I would start when he is very sleepy or asleep and not really paying attention, whenever my LO would have nursing strikes, that was always how I got him back on the boob.

    Good luck!

    Emily, mommy to
    Jeremija Charles - 5/30/07 - nursed 26 mo, and
    Aleksandar Hayes - 12/13/09 - nursing strong!


    "Forget past mistakes. Forget failures. Forget everything except what you are going to do now and do it." - William Durant

    If you really want to do something, you'll find a way, if you don't, you'll find an excuse.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,349

    Default Re: Should I re-lactate my happy baby?

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*jeremijasmommy View Post
    I would!! Even if just to save some $$ and help his immunity as he grows up. I would hate to see you have guilt for the rest of your life for NOT trying, and it can't really hurt. If you try for a few weeks and it doesn't stick, at least you know you tried and he won't ever remember the "stress."

    I would start when he is very sleepy or asleep and not really paying attention, whenever my LO would have nursing strikes, that was always how I got him back on the boob.

    Good luck!
    Go for it, mama!
    Imma to AA, born at home 11/12/07 , juggling , working, APing , cloth diapering , - and . I'm done - yay!

    http://bf.lilypie.com/KmpEm6.png

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    5,883

    Default Re: Should I re-lactate my happy baby?

    At 8 weeks postpartum, it's not too late to relactate without a lot of hard work. Pump 10 times a day around the clock for 15-20 min and put your baby to the breast. Perhaps consider cosleeping so you baby can comfort nurse and stimulate your breasts to produce milk. It's not too late and your LO is willing to take the breast. Don't leave anything on the table and have a lifetime of regrets. You will make some milk pretty quickly I bet.

    Also, talk to your doctor about taking reglan or domperidone to increase prolactin levels to help produce more milk faster.

    Let us know how your relaction journey goes.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    19,880

    Default Re: Should I re-lactate my happy baby?

    Go for it! I know your baby is on a schedule and is content, and you're worried about the stress that relactation might cause- but all those things are very small compared to the potential gains if you can get your baby back on the breast.

    This is not meant in any way to guilt-trip you into relactating, but it always helps me to make lists, so here are 2, the first of potential drawbacks to relactating, and the second of potential benefits.

    Drawbacks:
    - Your schedule will probably go right out the window.
    - Your baby may have some confusing and stressful days/weeks as he transitions from formula to breast.
    - You're going to have to do some hard work as you transition from formula-feeding to breastfeeding.
    - You may have to spend some money on lactation consultants and gear (a good pump, herbs, maybe some lactation-boosting drugs, perhaps a supplemental nursing system).

    Benefits:
    - If relactating doesn't work out, you will get your schedule back, your baby will be content, he'll never remember any of this, and you won't be tormented thinking "I wonder what would have happened if..." because you'll have given it your best shot.
    - Breastfed babies are healthier babies- they are less likely to suffer from conditions like diarrhea, constipation, ear infections, allergies, and asthma.
    - Breastfed babies become healthier children and adults- they are less likely to suffer from conditions like obesity, diabetes, and allergies, and are even less likely to need braces because breastfeeding promotes optimal dental alignment.
    - Breastfed babies are cheaper babies- you can expect to spend around $100-$1500 on a year's worth of formula.
    - Breastfeeding is good for you, too: it reduces your risk for conditions like breast cancer, obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis, and even heart disease.
    - Breastfeeding doesn't have to be all or nothing. Even if you only breastfeed part-time and formula-feed the rest of the time, your baby is still getting a huge benefit.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

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