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Thread: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

  1. #11
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    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    I understand that meat has iron & protein... but so do tons of other foods that aren't stagnant, rotting flesh...(it's true). There are living foods that are so much better for their systems. Beans, tofu, cheese, hummus, tahini (when old enough), yogurt, peas, lentils. If there is concern about complete proteins, all it takes is a little food combining to make it right. Just speaking for me, of course... knowing all the hard work I've put into providing the best nutrition -BM- why take the chance of harming her developing system because meat is 'handy'. I would wait at least 3-4 years to introduce meat on the body. I don't normally care what people do with their bodies, but now that we are talking about giving meat to babies, I am strangely finding myself emotionally aroused.
    Nursed for 18 months

  2. #12
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    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    I'm not interested in getting into a debate about meat vs vegetarianism, but I will say that when meat is cooked properly (especially if marinated in a marinade made with something acidic like vinegar) and soft and tender (easy to chew) it isn't hard to digest.

    You're right that there are lots of other proteins out their other than meat and we use a lot of them. But meat is also a part of our well rounded diet and referring to it as rotting flesh when you know a lot of people on these forums eat it might not be the best choice of words.
    ~Jenn~


    mother of 2 boys!
    08/14/98~~03/20/08

    Birth: 7lbs 12oz, 1 year: 22lbs 11oz
    until he self-weaned 4 days before his third birthday ... still on occasion ... and happily

    ************************************************** ************************************************** *****************
    People need to understand that when they're deciding between breastmilk and formula, they're not deciding between Coke and Pepsi.... They're choosing between a live, pure substance and a dead substance made with the cheapest oils available. ~Chele Marmet

  3. #13
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    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    I think that discussing whether or not to introduce meat to an infant/toddler is worthy of discussion... as we do here with many foods and methods of introducing solids. But you are right I am not going to push any "ism" onto anyone. I am just concerned for the developing child.

    I call meat rotting flesh because I think sometimes we forget where it comes from. If people are comfortable with what it is then it shouldn't really be offensive. Meat is a stagnant food that remains in the body for weeks. It breaks my heart that children are given this food before they know what it is. It doesn't seem fair.
    Nursed for 18 months

  4. #14
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    Oct 2008
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    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*sch.mommy View Post
    I'm not interested in getting into a debate about meat vs vegetarianism, but I will say that when meat is cooked properly (especially if marinated in a marinade made with something acidic like vinegar) and soft and tender (easy to chew) it isn't hard to digest.

    You're right that there are lots of other proteins out their other than meat and we use a lot of them. But meat is also a part of our well rounded diet and referring to it as rotting flesh when you know a lot of people on these forums eat it might not be the best choice of words.


    Agreed. Like it or not, humans are omnivores. Meaning we eat meat AND plants. Vegetarianism is a personal choice which is fine and dandy if that's the way you choose to eat, but to imply that eating meat is disgusting and unnatural is just not helpful. You may personally find it disgusting, and that's fine. But the human race has evolved as a species of meat eaters. Would you expect a baby lion cub to go from mother's milk to leaves and twigs?
    Mama of two precious girls
    DD1 born 23 July 2008 and
    DD2 born 14 January 2010

  5. #15
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    Jan 2008
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    1,081

    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*hiranmayii View Post
    I think that discussing whether or not to introduce meat to an infant/toddler is worthy of discussion... as we do here with many foods and methods of introducing solids. But you are right I am not going to push any "ism" onto anyone. I am just concerned for the developing child.

    I call meat rotting flesh because I think sometimes we forget where it comes from. If people are comfortable with what it is then it shouldn't really be offensive. Meat is a stagnant food that remains in the body for weeks. It breaks my heart that children are given this food before they know what it is. It doesn't seem fair.
    I find it interesting that when the WHO recommends breastfeeding for up to 2 years and beyond, everyone claps their hands and quotes them. But, when the WHO recommends something else that is also not the norm for babies, like breastfeeding for at least 2 years is not the norm either, as well as feeding babies meats as a first food is not the norm, the recommendation is flamed. I don't understand why many babies are fed what they are for first foods - why is rice cereal so popular when there's SO much more that's healthier?

    And if you read the article I linked, there is a TON of other sources of protein listed. I don't think it's fair to say that people who choose to follow the recommendation to give their baby meat first is doing so simply because it's handy. And honestly, how does anything stay in our stomachs for weeks?

    By the way, I think it's good to question things, but it's also important to have an open mind to something we didn't know and may seem odd to us.
    Last edited by @llli*jenniebean5; July 22nd, 2009 at 11:10 AM.
    Mommy to:

    Emmalynn Marie
    Born at 37 weeks on 12/22/06
    5lbs 1oz 19 1/2in

    Owen Charles
    Born at 29 wks 6 days on 01/17/09
    2lbs 14oz 15in
    In NICU for 2 months


  6. #16
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    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    great post jenniebean5

  7. #17
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    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    heres a great article about:

    How Does Digestion Work and How Can I Improve Mine

    http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?t...#faqdiscussion

  8. #18
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    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*andreafromohio View Post
    great post jenniebean5
    I'm Hillary
    Wife to Gualberto
    Mom to Nolan
    Born at 32 weeks-3lbs/10oz
    11-25-2007
    Our precious early angel


    Remember, you are not managing an inconvenience; You are raising a human being ~ Kittie Frantz
    Unthinking respect for authority is the greatest enemy of truth ~ Albert Einstein
    First they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they fight you, then you win ~ Mahatma Gandhi
    Looking for more information about vaccines?

  9. #19
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    Jun 2008
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    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    I just wanted to add that I read a great book while learning to feed my first baby called "My Child Won't Eat" by Carlos Gonzalez. It's a LLL book recommended to me by a leader. Anyway, it helped me to realize that children will eat what their bodies need when offered a variety of healthy choices. IMHO this includes meat. Both of my babies have LOVED meat - and have had no issues with digestion related to eating meat (of course I choose to give them only certain kinds of meat as I believe that there are certain types of meat that are healthier than others). Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but I do think it is good to have a well rounded view of nutrition. I think we get ourselves into trouble when we lean to one extreme or the other when it comes to health. I would recommend that book to anyone and everyone. It helped me GREATLY!

    I'm Erica

    Mommy to "C" - currently 3 and half years old
    - nursed for one year

    and mommy to "M" - currently 2 years old
    - nursed for 23 months

    Wife to my handsome DH for 5 and a half years!

  10. #20
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    Jun 2008
    Location
    Montreal
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    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*jenniebean5 View Post
    I find it interesting that when the WHO recommends breastfeeding for up to 2 years and beyond, everyone claps their hands and quotes them. But, when the WHO recommends something else that is also not the norm for babies, like breastfeeding for at least 2 years is not the norm either, as well as feeding babies meats as a first food is not the norm, the recommendation is flamed. I don't understand why many babies are fed what they are for first foods - why is rice cereal so popular when there's SO much more that's healthier?

    By the way, I think it's good to question things, but it's also important to have an open mind to something we didn't know and may seem odd to us.
    You're very right about open-mindedness. BUT most people who are applauding the WHO for the recommendation fo breastfeeding for 2 years (I believe) already felt that way before the recommendation. So while it wasn't the norm for the world it was the norm for many of those who were speaking up in support. It wasn't a new idea for them. This, on the otherhand is. I think everyone is apprehensive of new ideas, especially one that recommends a first food that most people were told to introduce later due to various reasons. It is difficult to change your ideas about something after reading one article, no matter how well written and how good the sources are.
    Amanda
    Formerly: baby-blue-eyes

    Canadian Mum to Naomi Born 03/17/08 and has a dairy allergy we are hoping she will outgrow. Nursed for 1 year
    And Gavin Born 01/13/10. 22 months, still nursing and already determined to find every possible way of giving me a heart attack with his dare devilishness

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