Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies
Page 11 of 13 FirstFirst ... 78910111213 LastLast
Results 101 to 110 of 121

Thread: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

  1. #101
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,363

    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    Interesting all around! I like that I can hear different viewpoints. Back later with more thoughts... gotta go clean my kitchen!

    I'm Erica

    Mommy to "C" - currently 3 and half years old
    - nursed for one year

    and mommy to "M" - currently 2 years old
    - nursed for 23 months

    Wife to my handsome DH for 5 and a half years!

  2. #102
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,081

    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    About starting solids before 6 months - it seems like most things I have read say between 4-6 months is an ok time to start solids. Some do say it's not recommended before 6 months. The thing is, babies are all different and are ready for things and doing things at different ages and rates. So I think that's why there's an age range for starting solids. I think the reason why some people on here tell a mom they don't recommend starting solids with a baby that is before 6 months even though the mom says the baby is "wanting their food" is because many first time moms/parents are eager to start solids and mistake the signs of being ready to start solids. DH and I were really excited to start solids with Emma, our first baby, and so we did at 6 months, but honestly she just spit the cereal out. Owen is 7 months (4 1/2mo adjusted age) and we haven't started him yet because I'm looking for more signs that he's ready before we do.

    And a pp mentioned something about starting solids can decrease breastfeeding but that's not an absolute. Again, different babies do different things, including how often they nurse and how much/often they eat solids. Emma is still nursing once a day at 32 months and she's gets 3 meals a day and 2 snacks (she's not a great eater though). She didn't slow down on nursing AT ALL as I introduced solids. It depends on the kid.

    As far as the energy gap, it doesn't mean that a baby who isn't eating 3 meals a day at 6 months old isn't going to grow! That's ridiculous! But, the baby may not be getting enough of certain vitamins/minerals because at some point, breastmilk doesn't provide enough of certain things as babies grow. And it's not like with every single baby at 6 months old they aren't getting enough iron from their reserves and the breastmilk - it's a gradual thing but they have to give some age - can't taylor the age to everyone's baby and breastmilk. Remember, the WHO is speaking for worldwide stuff - where nutrition varies and stuff.

    Like with EVERYTHING else - this is not a one size fits all thing. The WHO put out complementary food recommendations - take them as just that!
    Mommy to:

    Emmalynn Marie
    Born at 37 weeks on 12/22/06
    5lbs 1oz 19 1/2in

    Owen Charles
    Born at 29 wks 6 days on 01/17/09
    2lbs 14oz 15in
    In NICU for 2 months


  3. #103
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,081

    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    From the article...

    Breast milk is the natural first food for babies and should be fed
    alone for at least 4 months and if possible 6 months. However,
    after this period additional foods (complementary foods) are
    needed. To make sure that young children grow well and stay
    healthy, it is important to know which foods to give, how much
    to give, and how often. Breast milk should be the main food
    throughout the baby's first year, and an important food during
    the second year. Breast milk continues to provide unique antiinfective
    factors that other foods cannot.
    Last edited by @llli*jenniebean5; August 22nd, 2009 at 12:36 PM.
    Mommy to:

    Emmalynn Marie
    Born at 37 weeks on 12/22/06
    5lbs 1oz 19 1/2in

    Owen Charles
    Born at 29 wks 6 days on 01/17/09
    2lbs 14oz 15in
    In NICU for 2 months


  4. #104
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    4,007

    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*alittlesandy View Post
    This is such a great discussion! It makes me realize why I love this forum so much. So many smart mamas.

    However, I'm going to play devil's advocate, because that's what I do. It drives DH crazy.

    We tell each other to pay attention to our instincts and to read multiple sources and not follow any one source blindly. HOWEVER, when any mom suggests that she thinks her baby is ready for solids before six months, we say: NO NO NO. You are wrong. Your instincts are wrong. The signals are wrong. Your trusted pediatrician is wrong. Your mother is wrong.

    There are many credible sources that say 4-6 months. There are babies who are literally grabbing food frantically or crying in frustration when others eat in front of them (and they are NOT displaying this intensity with car keys and other adult items or with their toys). There are babies who are insatiably hungry.

    While I agree that four months is WAY TOO YOUNG, I do think there are some babies who become ready a little early, between 22-26 weeks, just as there are babies who develop differently in other ways. Telling a mother who has a frantically dissatisfied baby that she has to wait until the magical six month mark is not helpful to her, and she may just give up and turn away from other wonderful advice offered here, embracing the world of cereals and jarred purees, because that's what the others do, the ones who say it's ok for her to start early.

    I know this is controversial. I'm just thinking out loud. I love that we can have intelligent and civil discussions here.
    to what I have bolded .... I don't think ANYONE has said this. When referring to not listening to OLD advice, it's just that - old advice. Not that your mother WAS wrong when she mothered her children, just that her advice is OUTDATED. When you ask for opinions here you are going to get them The general consesnus on these particular forums is to wait until at least 6 months to start solids. That's all we offer - our opinions. And we hope they help someone. No one is forced to listen to anyone here. Again, a part of the LLL philospsy is to "take what works for you and leave the rest". Also, as stated in LLL literature HERE (which of course is what a lot of the members of the LLLi forums adhere to),
    "Human milk is the only food that healthy, full-term babies need for about the first six months of life. The composition of human milk varies according to the time of day and the age of the baby, so that each mother provides the milk that meets her own baby's unique needs. Human milk provides immunity factors for as long as the baby nurses, and many of the health benefits of breastfeeding continue well into childhood and beyond.

    Most solid foods are lower in calories than human milk, of lower nutritional value, and can be difficult for young babies to digest. Introduced early, they can cause unpleasant reactions and even trigger allergies. These problems can be avoided by waiting until your baby is ready for solids. Some parents have found introducing solids before baby is ready to be a waste of time, energy and money.

    Breastfed babies do not need to have complementary food introduced until about the middle of the first year. "
    Again, take what works for you. But to question why certain people offer certain advice is a question that has a tremendous amount of answers. It's different for everyone. We talk from experience, from research, and from our own instinct. No one is forced to follow any advice given here.
    ~Jenn~


    mother of 2 boys!
    08/14/98~~03/20/08

    Birth: 7lbs 12oz, 1 year: 22lbs 11oz
    until he self-weaned 4 days before his third birthday ... still on occasion ... and happily

    ************************************************** ************************************************** *****************
    People need to understand that when they're deciding between breastmilk and formula, they're not deciding between Coke and Pepsi.... They're choosing between a live, pure substance and a dead substance made with the cheapest oils available. ~Chele Marmet

  5. #105
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,363

    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    I so agree with everything posted. We are raising BABIES, not robots, so it's not one size fits all. However, I think in American culture we may have to be a little more vocal about waiting on solids simply because the pressure to FF and start solids too early is so prevalent. JMO. Many moms don't have the correct information about bf and bm and think that their babies aren't getting the nutrition they need to grow if they don't start solids at exactly 6 mo. So, I don't mind the opinions here.

    Also, I was the one who posted about solids interfering w/ bf. I should have said more clearly that this was my experience, not one size fits all.

    I'm Erica

    Mommy to "C" - currently 3 and half years old
    - nursed for one year

    and mommy to "M" - currently 2 years old
    - nursed for 23 months

    Wife to my handsome DH for 5 and a half years!

  6. #106
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    233

    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*jenniebean5 View Post
    From the article...

    Breast milk is the natural first food for babies and should be fed
    alone for at least 4 months and if possible 6 months. However,
    after this period additional foods (complementary foods) are
    needed.
    To make sure that young children grow well and stay
    healthy, it is important to know which foods to give, how much
    to give, and how often. Breast milk should be the main food
    throughout the baby's first year, and an important food during
    the second year. Breast milk continues to provide unique antiinfective
    factors that other foods cannot.
    That phrase in bold is exactly what I am talking about when I said that the WHO said there is an energy gap after 6 months. They definitely didn't say that as an opinion that Mothers can take or leave, so what do we believe? Have they done lab and scientific data testing to know whether breastmilk is sufficient or not?And this is exactly why Moms start pushing solids because they are afraid if they don't their baby is not going to be getting everything he/she needs. I just want to see some evidence!!!!
    Josiah born at home 1/26/2009, 50 months and counting , and Adlai born 6/26/12

  7. #107
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    4,007

    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*janelle525 View Post
    That phrase in bold is exactly what I am talking about when I said that the WHO said there is an energy gap after 6 months. They definitely didn't say that as an opinion that Mothers can take or leave, so what do we believe? Have they done lab and scientific data testing to know whether breastmilk is sufficient or not?And this is exactly why Moms start pushing solids because they are afraid if they don't their baby is not going to be getting everything he/she needs. I just want to see some evidence!!!!
    I don't think I understand what you're asking Are you asking what YOU should believe? because I already know what *I* believe to be true. I don't think there is a right answer for "we" because we are all going to do things differently. If you need scientific data than you're going to have to research it Check out OTHER sources, beyond the WHO if you're not happy with what they say. Kellymom is a great resource for anything to do with breastmilk. I doubt though, that you'll find any evidence based on "experiments" with child nutrition. There are tons of moms here though, who've waited until 10 months (or whenever) to start solids, and they have perfectly healthy babies who aren't lacking ANY nutrients. If you're concerned you could always have a blood test done for things such as iron
    Last edited by @llli*sch.mommy; August 22nd, 2009 at 03:14 PM.
    ~Jenn~


    mother of 2 boys!
    08/14/98~~03/20/08

    Birth: 7lbs 12oz, 1 year: 22lbs 11oz
    until he self-weaned 4 days before his third birthday ... still on occasion ... and happily

    ************************************************** ************************************************** *****************
    People need to understand that when they're deciding between breastmilk and formula, they're not deciding between Coke and Pepsi.... They're choosing between a live, pure substance and a dead substance made with the cheapest oils available. ~Chele Marmet

  8. #108
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,363

    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    Well, I know that I couldn't get either of my children to eat more than a few tablespoons of food per day until at least 9 mo. They were EBF until that point. They are VERY healthy and happy! But, that's just my experience.

    I'm Erica

    Mommy to "C" - currently 3 and half years old
    - nursed for one year

    and mommy to "M" - currently 2 years old
    - nursed for 23 months

    Wife to my handsome DH for 5 and a half years!

  9. #109
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,081

    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*sch.mommy View Post
    I don't think I understand what you're asking Are you asking what YOU should believe? because I already know what *I* believe to be true. I don't think there is a right answer for "we" because we are all going to do things differently. If you need scientific data than you're going to have to research it Check out OTHER sources, beyond the WHO if you're not happy with what they say. Kellymom is a great resource for anything to do with breastmilk. I doubt though, that you'll find any evidence based on "experiments" with child nutrition. There are tons of moms here though, who've waited until 10 months (or whenever) to start solids, and they have perfectly healthy babies who aren't lacking ANY nutrients. If you're concerned you could always have a blood test done for things such as iron
    How does anyone know they aren't lacking in any nutrients? Unless things are tested for, it might not be known if something is missing or there isn't enough of it. I don't know many moms who have their babies tested to see if they have enough various minerals/vitamins in them. Iron testing seems to be routine, but not other stuff. I've been reading lately that if you live in northern places in the US, like where I live (MI) people aren't getting enough Vitamin D. The amount currently in regular vitamins is apparently not enough. I know some health professionals who have decided to have their vitamin D levels checked (who were taking supplements) and were way low. I'm going to have mine checked in the fall to see. This is a vitamin that I've been told breastmilk can be deficient in if the mother's body is deficient in it.

    Anyways, I'm not trying to be argumentative, so sorry if it sounds that way. I am fine with people not giving solids at 6 months - I'm not with Owen yet and he's 7 months. I'm just saying, someone can appear perfectly healthy and yet not have enough of certain vitamins. So it goes back to these are just recommendations and aren't a one size fits all thing. Each family has to do what they feel is best for them.
    Mommy to:

    Emmalynn Marie
    Born at 37 weeks on 12/22/06
    5lbs 1oz 19 1/2in

    Owen Charles
    Born at 29 wks 6 days on 01/17/09
    2lbs 14oz 15in
    In NICU for 2 months


  10. #110
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    4,007

    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    I'm just repeating what was posted here by various mothers with healthy children who started solids "late". To know their particular case you would have to ask them, yk? However, there are usually symptoms of a vitamin/mineral deficiency. For example, bleeding gums, easy bruising, loose teeth, may indicate a vitamin C deficiency; constipation and/or brittle nails may indicate an iron deficiency; acne, growth impairment may indicate a vitamin A deficiency, etc... Here is a site with a bunch of possible deficiencies and their symptoms if you’re interested. If you child is otherwise healthy and is not exhibiting signs or symptoms of any sort of deficiency I doubt a doctor would even test for it, kwim? If there is a wide spread vitamin deficiency in a particular area (like the vitamin D that you mentioned for example) it’s usually sent out in a public health announcement, and you can get tested. *I* believe that the body has a way of telling you when something is wrong. Most new literature (including Kellymom, the APP, and the WHO) now states “at least 6 months and when baby is developmentally ready” which means 6 months at the very earliest. That leads *me* to believe that it’s not harmful to wait longer than 6 months, kwim? According to kellymom, it's perfectly healthy (and encouraged) to have breastmilk make up 75% of a babies diet by the age of one, 50% by age 18 months, and 20 % at age 2. Having breastmilk make up 75 % of ones diet leads me to believe that it is probably the most nutrient dense "food" to give baby.

    And I agree that it isn't a one size fits all. That was my initial point, lol. You have to take what works for you and leave the rest
    ~Jenn~


    mother of 2 boys!
    08/14/98~~03/20/08

    Birth: 7lbs 12oz, 1 year: 22lbs 11oz
    until he self-weaned 4 days before his third birthday ... still on occasion ... and happily

    ************************************************** ************************************************** *****************
    People need to understand that when they're deciding between breastmilk and formula, they're not deciding between Coke and Pepsi.... They're choosing between a live, pure substance and a dead substance made with the cheapest oils available. ~Chele Marmet

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •