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Thread: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

  1. #1
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    Default World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    I am doing some research on the best complimentary foods once a baby is 6 months old and this is a great source of info. I started reading it because a lactation consultant told me recently that the WHO recommends meat (liver is actually best) and other animal products as baby's first complementary foods. It's a lengthy article, but worth the read.

    http://whqlibdoc.who.int/hq/2000/WHO_NHD_00.1.pdf
    Mommy to:

    Emmalynn Marie
    Born at 37 weeks on 12/22/06
    5lbs 1oz 19 1/2in

    Owen Charles
    Born at 29 wks 6 days on 01/17/09
    2lbs 14oz 15in
    In NICU for 2 months


  2. #2
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    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    Very informative. The only question I have is that I thought breat milk was the only thing needed up until 12 months. This shows where it only provides half of what is needed around 9 months or so. Can someone help me out?

    Proud Vegetarian Momma

  3. #3
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    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    I've never heard/read of breastmilk being the only food source for the first year, but definitely for the first 6 months.

    According the the AAP: "Complementary foods rich in iron should be introduced gradually beginning around 6 months of age.186–187" (http://aappolicy.aappublications.org...rics;115/2/496)

    According to the American Academy of Family Physicians: "The AAFP recommends that all babies, with rare exceptions, be breastfed and/or receive expressed human milk exclusively for the first six months of life. Breastfeeding should continue with the addition of complementary foods throughout the second half of the first year. Breastfeeding beyond the first year offers considerable benefits to both mother and child, and should continue as long as mutually desired. Family physicians should have the knowledge to promote, protect, and support breastfeeding. (1989) (2007)" (http://www.aafp.org/online/en/home/p...ingpolicy.html)

    So basically, breastfeeding is all a baby needs for the first 6 months of life, but after that, according to the WHO also - in the link posted above, there are nutrient and energy gaps that need to be filled by complementary foods. Breastmilk should still be the main source of food for the baby but additional foods should be introduced - it's not like a 6mo old baby should all of a sudden begin eating 3 meals of "solids" a day, but rather, the baby can begin to be introduced to "solids" slowly, without replacing any breastmilk the baby gets.
    Mommy to:

    Emmalynn Marie
    Born at 37 weeks on 12/22/06
    5lbs 1oz 19 1/2in

    Owen Charles
    Born at 29 wks 6 days on 01/17/09
    2lbs 14oz 15in
    In NICU for 2 months


  4. #4
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    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    I have always understood, too, that breastfeeding is all a child needs until 12 months. Solids before then are for the purpose of introducing tastes, textures, learning etc. Not necessarily nutrients. I don't know why the WHO would recommend liver/meats as a first food. Maybe someone else on here has more insight on this.

    "Breastmilk should make up the majority of baby’s nutrition through the end of the first year. At some point toward the end of the first year, most babies will gradually begin to need more iron and zinc than that provided by breastmilk alone - at that point, additional nutrients can be obtained from small amounts of solids.

    Some babies thrive on breastmilk alone until 12 months or later - as long as your baby is continuing to gain weight and grow as he should, your milk is meeting his needs well. " from http://kellymom.com/nutrition/solids...html#nutrition
    Amanda
    Formerly: baby-blue-eyes

    Canadian Mum to Naomi Born 03/17/08 and has a dairy allergy we are hoping she will outgrow. Nursed for 1 year
    And Gavin Born 01/13/10. 22 months, still nursing and already determined to find every possible way of giving me a heart attack with his dare devilishness

  5. #5
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    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    Wonder if they've changed their tune recently?

    From a WHO Q and A

    Up to what age can a baby stay well nourished by just being breastfed?



    Question and answer archives

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    Q: Up to what age can a baby stay well nourished by just being breastfed?

    A: Infants should be exclusively breastfed – i.e. receive only breast milk – for the first six months of life to achieve optimal growth, development and health. "Exclusive breastfeeding" is defined as giving no other food or drink – not even water – except breast milk. It does, however, allow the infant to receive drops and syrups (vitamins, minerals and medicines). Breast milk is the ideal food for the healthy growth and development of infants; breastfeeding is also an integral part of the reproductive process with important implications for the health of mothers.

    WHO recommends that infants start receiving complementary foods at six months (180 days) of age in addition to breast milk. Complementary foods should be given 2–3 times a day between 6–8 months, increasing to 3–4 times a day between 9–11 months. Between 12–23 months of age, 3–4 meals should be given. In addition, depending on the child's appetite, 1–2 nutritious snacks can be offered between meals. These foods should be adequate, meaning that they provide sufficient energy, protein and micronutrients to meet a growing child's nutritional needs. Foods should be prepared and given in a safe manner to minimize the risk of contamination. Feeding young infants requires active care and stimulation to encourage the child to eat.

    The transition from exclusive breastfeeding to full use of family foods is a very vulnerable period. It is the time when many infants become malnourished, contributing significantly to the high prevalence of malnutrition in children under five years of age worldwide. It is essential therefore that infants receive appropriate, adequate and safe complementary foods to ensure the right transition from the breastfeeding period to the full use of family foods.
    Last edited by @llli*sentimental.geek; July 22nd, 2009 at 06:54 AM.
    Mama of two precious girls
    DD1 born 23 July 2008 and
    DD2 born 14 January 2010

  6. #6
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    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    meat has lots of iron I think thats maybe why they say to introduce it then.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    Continued...

    Amounts of foods to offer

    Age 6–8 months

    Texture - Start with thick porridge, well mashed foods
    Continue with mashed family foods

    Frequency - 2–3 meals per day, plus frequent breastfeeds
    Depending on the child's appetite, 1–2 snacks may be offered

    Amount at each meal - Start with 2–3 tablespoonfuls per feed, increasing gradually to ½ of a 250 ml cup

    Age 9-11 months

    Texture - Finely chopped or mashed foods, and foods that baby can pick up

    Frequency - 3–4 meals per day, plus breastfeeds
    Depending on the child's appetite, 1–2 snacks may be offered

    Amount at each meal - ½ of a 250 ml cup/bowl

    Age 12 - 23 months

    Texture - Family foods, chopped or mashed if necessary

    Frequency - 3–4 meals per day, plus breastfeeds
    Depending on the child's appetite, 1–2 snacks may be offered

    Amount at each meal - ¾ to full 250 ml cup/bowl

    Note: If baby is not breastfed, give in addition: 1–2 cups of milk per day, and 1–2 extra meals per day.
    Mama of two precious girls
    DD1 born 23 July 2008 and
    DD2 born 14 January 2010

  8. #8
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    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*andreafromohio View Post
    meat has lots of iron I think thats maybe why they say to introduce it then.
    which is probably why they suggest liver. I haven't researched it in awhile, but when B was starting solids, I read a bunch of stuff that stated meat is much easier on their systems to digest than grains. I think one of the 'reasons' we start with rice cereal (other than rice being low allergy) is that it is fortified with iron.

    Back when Kate was a baby, her doctor told me (which I got this info from him, I didn't personally look into it) that breast fed babies have a good iron store and get everything they need from breast milk for the first 6 months, but after that, they need more iron from other sources. FF babies, it doesn't matter because their formula is fortified. Not that he was promoting formula, but just wanted to make sure she had iron rich foods.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*shannon75 View Post
    I read a bunch of stuff that stated meat is much easier on their systems to digest than grains.


    From milk to meat? LOL.

    This seems odd to me Meat is rotting flesh, how can this be easily digested by a tiny baby's developing liver & kidney. I will just agree to disagree. Wholeheartedly.
    Nursed for 18 months

  10. #10
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    Default Re: World Health Organization recommendations for complementary foods...

    also, I think that because our breastmilk is classified as a carbohydrate, it's important to offer a protein source and meat is very high in protein. To offer more carbs doesn't make sense to me With that said, we started with veggies/fruits but quickly went to shredded chicken because of iron/protein content.
    ~Jenn~


    mother of 2 boys!
    08/14/98~~03/20/08

    Birth: 7lbs 12oz, 1 year: 22lbs 11oz
    until he self-weaned 4 days before his third birthday ... still on occasion ... and happily

    ************************************************** ************************************************** *****************
    People need to understand that when they're deciding between breastmilk and formula, they're not deciding between Coke and Pepsi.... They're choosing between a live, pure substance and a dead substance made with the cheapest oils available. ~Chele Marmet

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