Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Please, Need help for my Sister

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    58

    Default Please, Need help for my Sister

    I need help encouraging my sister.
    She just delivered a baby boy very late last night. She really wanted to BF, but she had a very tough delivery. After 36 hours & 3 epidurals, they needed to put her under & operate.
    She & her lo are both healthy, though exhausted. She tried to nurse this morning, but lo was not a good latcher… She’s soooo exhausted & in a good deal of pain, and very discouraged. DH is great man but will do what ever the nurses say is best, which is let mom rest & give us the baby.
    I am nursing my 10m old dd, I don’t want to seem like I’m coming down on her. But I want to help her through this tough time. How can I gently offer support with out sound like the bfing gastapo??? I know nursing after a c is more difficult; are there better positions I can show her??? Any help is much appreciated. Thank you,
    Erika

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,987

    Default Re: Please, Need help for my Sister

    Is there a lactation consultant on staff at the hospital? They could probably help her out with some different positions. Maybe you could let her know that getting started is tough for a lot of us, but it does get easier! Pulling for her...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    18,063

    Default Re: Please, Need help for my Sister

    can you take her a boppy type pillow? That helped me nurse my dd.
    that and maybe a copy of the womanly art of breastfeeding.
    Can you go to the hospital and just help her with the baby? show her what a good latch looks like.
    Encorage her to take her pain meds, and to get out of bed and start moving around, drinking and eating will help her feal beter also. Shes going to feal alot beter on the 2nd day then the 1st..
    I know that when I had my dd I wanted her with me, and when she was at the nursery I was a wreck.
    are they giving the baby bottles?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    8,018

    Default Re: Please, Need help for my Sister

    Two positions that are supposed to be good for c-section moms are football hold and side-lying. Football is done while sitting up or partially reclined. If she is feeding the baby with the left breast-hold the baby with her left arm (use pillows for extra support under her arm and under the baby-or have someon else help her hold the baby) and latch baby on to the breast from the side. This keeps mom from having to hold the baby on her incision.
    Side lying can be tricky, but also has the virtue of keeping the baby off the incision and allowing mom to rest. Pillows and helpers to get position correct and stay comfortable are important.
    Also, keep in mind (and tell your sister) that the baby does not need any milk for the first few days of life, so there is no need to supplement unless there is a special indication for it. The baby is still living off the nutrients from the placenta. The importance of baby suckling ASAP is: (1) get mom's supply going, (2) learn how to suck so they know what their doing when the milk comes in, and (3) get that all-important colostrum. An additional reason to avoid supplements is to avoid nipple confusion/preference in the baby. There is probably no "better" way to screw up a BFing relationship from the start.
    I did not have a C-section, but my DS was not latching well. So, while we continued to work on latch in the hospital, I pumped with the hospital pump and he was fed colostrum out of a little cup (like you'd use for liquid medicine). Pumping at least accomplished two objectives: encouraging the milk to come in and providing any pumped colostrum for baby to drink. (Keep in mind, this will probably be in very small amounts.) It was surprising how well he took it from a cup!
    For your sister, using the two positions mentioned and pumping should help her get off to a good BFing start despite her rough labor and delivery. And get her as much help as possible with the latch issue. The nurses could take the baby for a while, but with strict instructions not to supplement with any bottles or artificial nipples and to bring the baby to mom whenever it wants to nurse.
    ((Hugs)) to you all. What a rough start! But, congrats on the new nephew! Is he doing okay other than the latch?
    HTH!

    Molly

    Loving mama to JP (DS, 1/03 ~ nursed 6 mos), EL (DD1, 9/05 ~ nursed 4 yrs), EJ (DD2, 3/08 ~ nursed 3 yrs 9 mos), and
    JM (DD3, 6/12 ~ currently nursing), all born naturally
    Devoted wife to SAHD P, my hero
    A few of my favorite things that I've discovered on the forum: co-sleeping, baby-wearing, tandem nursing, baby-led solids, cloth diapering, APing, selective vaccination...the list goes on

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,168

    Default Re: Please, Need help for my Sister

    What a great sister to seek out information so quickly! What a rough start they had, with a brutal and long labor ending with a cesarean birth.

    I completely agree with the above advice. If you can go there yourself to oversee things and help keep the baby in the room, wonderful, but if not, just encourage your BIL to do the same. Talk about the risks of introducing bottles needlessly and the importance of breast stimulation -- "nurse early and often" is a guiding concept for successful breastfeeding.

    As you gently nudge your sister towards these practices, do be careful to remember that all is not lost even with a rocky start in the hospital. She is going to need your support and encouragement over the long haul, and you want to make sure that your words now will help her to feel safe and trusting around you. That early postpartum period is very vulnerable and very impressionable -- I know that I was greatly impacted by the direct and indirect messages I received from the people around me during and soon after giving birth. Above all, a new mother needs to hear people she trusts saying that she is doing things right and will be a wonderful mother -- so praise WHATEVER you can find to praise about what she is sharing with you, and build up her confidence continuously.

    Best wishes for a speedy recovery and a happy breastfeeding experience to your sister and nephew. Keep us posted!

    --Rebecca

  6. #6

    Default Re: Please, Need help for my Sister

    Quote Originally Posted by mollyb
    Also, keep in mind (and tell your sister) that the baby does not need any milk for the first few days of life, so there is no need to supplement unless there is a special indication for it. The baby is still living off the nutrients from the placenta. The importance of baby suckling ASAP is: (1) get mom's supply going, (2) learn how to suck so they know what their doing when the milk comes in, and (3) get that all-important colostrum.
    Once the baby is birthed, and the umbilical cord is cut, the baby is no longer receiving nutrients from the placenta. Colostrum is an important and highly valuable nutrient to the baby. It is high in carbohydrates and protein to help keep baby's blood sugar levels up. It has a laxative effect and helps baby to pass the meconium (first stool). It also helps to keep baby hydrated and provides immune factors. You can read all about colostrum in this article:

    http://www.lalecheleague.org/FAQ/colostrum.html

    If baby is not getting any feedings at the breast within several hours of birth, then supplementation is indeed necessary. Without any food, baby's blood sugar levels can drop (and in extreme cases cause damage). Baby can also become dehydrated, which can lead to or worsen jaundice.

    While it is true that we encourage mothers to breastfeed early and often to help baby learn to suckle and to help the milk come in, we also encourage it because colostrum is the perfect first food for babies.

    Jen
    Last edited by LLL LactoJen; September 8th, 2006 at 11:12 AM.
    "Mothers are designed to be available to their babies--to help them make the transition into this big, wide world. To teach them to trust, and love, and feel good about being alive."
    --Elizabeth N. Baldwin, Esq., So I Nursed Him Every 45 Minutes

    Click here to find your local LLL Group
    How to tell if your breastfed baby is getting enough milk!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    58

    Default Re: Update Please, Need help for my Sister

    Thank you all so much, it's been a long week,but my sister is doing much better & so is her lo. his now latching great & nursing like a little champ. she & my bil are home & happy & working their way thru that 1st week.
    again, many thanks for your support.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Please, Need help for my Sister

    Thanks for the update! Glad things are going better for them!
    Jen
    "Mothers are designed to be available to their babies--to help them make the transition into this big, wide world. To teach them to trust, and love, and feel good about being alive."
    --Elizabeth N. Baldwin, Esq., So I Nursed Him Every 45 Minutes

    Click here to find your local LLL Group
    How to tell if your breastfed baby is getting enough milk!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •