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Thread: Hello

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    2

    Default Hello

    I delivered my son at 29 weeks on Jan. 20. With my first child I dried out within 4 weeks. I really don't want that to happen again.

    Are there things I could do to better insure this time around? Expecially since I will be pumping for a longer time....


    Thank you for any info

    Bobbie

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Hello

    Bobbie,

    Congratulations on the birth of your son. I'm assuming that you're pumping to provide breastmilk for your son, right? I delivered my son at 28 weeks on Dec. 1 and he is still in the NICU where he will stay until he can grasp the concept of eating! I am faithfully pumping every 2 hours with a 5 hour sleeping break. My suggestion to you is that you keep a log and make sure you pump at least 9-10 times a day. Also, it helps to relax such as with a cup of tea. Prop up a photo of your son and think of him while you're pumping. The lactation consultant at the hospital recommended that if my milk supply decreases I should take the pump to the hospital and pump next to his crib. Hang in there because this can be a stressful time and you have a long haul ahead of you.

    Robin

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    3,900

    Default Re: Hello

    Congratulations, Bobbie! Congrats to you, too, Robin!

    Bobbie,
    Here are a some suggestions you might find helpful:
    • Pump with a hospital grade pump, and make sure the breast shields (the part that goes on your breast) fits properly (an IBCLC or LLL Leader could help assess this)

    • Pump at least 8-10 times a day. If you only have a few minutes to pump, do so anyway. Avoid going longer than 5 hours between pumping.

    • Consider having more than one expression kit (shields/tubing) so you can always have one clean and not be constantly washing pump parts.

    • As soon as your baby's care team will allow, start kangaroo care (holding baby on your chest, skin to skin). Studies have shown it helps to regulate a preemie's temperature, breathing, and heart rate. It also has a very positive effect on mother's milk production!

    • Try pumping next to baby's isolette. The sight, smell, and sound of your baby will trigger hormonal responses that will help to aid in letdown as well as milk production

    • If you're having difficulty pumping, try hand expression. Some mothers even find that it helps them to remove more milk after a pumping session. It can also be used at times when you don't want to/can't have a pump with you! Here is a link to the Marmet technique of hand expression: www.lactationinstitute.org/MANUALEX.html

    • If your milk supply is borderline, dwindling, or is just not sufficient,do talk to your doctor/midwife/IBCLC about galactagogues (milk increasers).

    • Take care of YOU. Get as much rest as you can. Allow others to help by assisting in the care of older children, doing household chores, and running errands.

    • Find support. *Live* support is best.


    LLL info:
    FAQs on breastfeeding your premature baby:
    http://www.lalecheleague.org/FAQ/FAQ...ure%20Infants:
    New Beginnings articles:
    http://www.lalecheleague.org/NB/NBpremature.html

    The following are NOT LLL resources, but you might find the information helpful:
    Kangaroo mother care:
    http://www.kangaroomothercare.com/
    Establishing and maintaining a milk supply when baby is not nursing:
    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/ma...pply-pump.html
    Exclusive pumping (article by Kathleen Bruce, IBCLC) Note: commercial site
    http://www.medela.com/NewFiles/faq/exclusivepumpg.html
    Last edited by LLL_Jolie; February 8th, 2006 at 10:36 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    11

    Default No Dairy / Gas Problems

    My son has developed high blood pressure and the doctor can't find the cause of it. One possibility is that he has terrible gas right now and that might be making him so uncomfortable that it is affecting his blood pressure. So, the lactation consultant suggests that I eliminate dairy from my diet.

    I need suggestions for what a healthy diet looks like without milk and cheese. What would make for a good snack?

    Also, I'm already avoiding spicy foods, beans, cabbage... what else should I avoid?

    Finally, my mom wants me to drink beer with my meal because she's heard that the yeast in it can be helpful. I told her that's an old wives tale. Any response?

    Thanks,

    Robin

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    3,900

    Default Re: No Dairy / Gas Problems

    Quote Originally Posted by Robin
    My son has developed high blood pressure and the doctor can't find the cause of it. One possibility is that he has terrible gas right now and that might be making him so uncomfortable that it is affecting his blood pressure. So, the lactation consultant suggests that I eliminate dairy from my diet.

    I need suggestions for what a healthy diet looks like without milk and cheese. What would make for a good snack?
    You might wish to check out the allergies forum. There are several mothers there who are currently on an elimination diet for dairy issues, and I'm sure they would have some wonderful suggestions for you! http://www.lalecheleague.org/vbullet...splay.php?f=37

    Here's a hidden dairy cheat sheet (PDF file) It's not a LLL resource, but you might find the information helpful:
    http://www.kellymom.com/store/freeha...en-dairy01.pdf

    Here is some information on an elimination diet. Again, it's not a LLL resource, but you might find the info helpful:
    http://www.askdrsears.com/html/4/T041200.asp

    This is an all-around handy resource for dairy sensitivities. It includes a great guide to what you CAN eat while remaining dairy-free. Yet again, it's not a LLL resource:
    http://www.kjsl.net/%7Ebeanmom/nomilk.html


    Quote Originally Posted by Robin
    Also, I'm already avoiding spicy foods, beans, cabbage... what else should I avoid?
    There is no one answer to this question. Most mothers find that they can eat pretty much anything without ill effect to their baby. Though, some babies do react to components of foods that are found in mother's diet (the most common culprit is dairy). If you're really concerned about many different foods affecting your baby, you might consider trying an elimination diet (there is a sample in the links above). This is something you might feel comfortable discussing with your IBCLC. I'm sure she would have more suggestions for you! If you need more info/links I'd be glad to hunt that up for you, as well.
    This link has some good info (NOT a LLL resource):
    http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/mom/mom-foods.html

    Quote Originally Posted by Robin
    Finally, my mom wants me to drink beer with my meal because she's heard that the yeast in it can be helpful. I told her that's an old wives tale. Any response?
    There is no scientific evidence that beer increases milk production. (see this non-LLL resource: http://www.kellymom.com/health/lifestyle/alcohol.html ) However, there is some very limited, anecdotal evidence that brewer's yeast can support milk production. The reasoning is thought to be because brewer's yeast is a rich source of B vitamins, and is also a source of protein and amino acids. Some mothers report that it makes their babies gassy. And since you're trying to *prevent* gas, I would suggest you talk to your baby's doctor and perhaps your IBCLC before trying it. It is believed, too, that eating foods that are rich in B vitamins, protein, and iron would have the same or better effect.
    Oatmeal is one such food. Many mothers report it gives their milk production a "boost". If you're looking for something that might help "support" your milk production, oatmeal is generally a safe thing to try. Here's an outside resource on oatmeal and milk production:
    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/oatmeal.

    HTH!

    Do keep us updated, Robin.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Hello

    Thank you both for all the information. A lot of it where things that no one has suggested. So far my milk is at a good level according to the nurse.

    Congratulations on your baby as well. I don't know anything about allergies for babies from your milk, but I am lactose intolerant. If you are trying to avoid dairy altogether, dairy is found in alot of foods that you wouldn't even think of it being there. Reading lables really helps with that. Even just the littlest of butter if a resturant cooks with it can make me sick sometimes.

    I hope you find the answers you are looking for.


    Bobbie

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Hello

    Thank you for the tips, Jolie! Bobbie, hang in there with your preemie and keep up the pumping.

    I just wanted to clarify that the doctor says there is no link between my son's high blood pressure and his gas problem. I'm still going dairy-free to see if it will help relieve his gas. He has received dairy-free milk for about 24 hours and already seems improved, but he's also getting some other medication (mylecon?) to help him. We hope to bring him home soon and someday I hope to be exclusively breastfeeding instead of pumping.

    Are there any other mothers of preemies out there who have stories to share?

    Take care,

    Robin

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Charleston SC
    Posts
    2,601

    Default Re: Hello

    Robin, I am already in prayer for you and your tiny baby! CONGRATS!! I am currently on an ed, and would also encourage you to ck out the allergy forums there is a lot of info over there. Please keep us updated.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Hello

    My daughter Meredith was born 5 weeks premature and weighed 4 pounds. I had been determined my entire pregnancy to breastfeed, but Meredith was not up to the challenge when she was born. Because her weight was so low, she was given formula from a bottle until my milk came in. I spent 14 weeks pumping every 2-3 hours, day and night, just so she could have breastmilk. When I finally got to the point where I told my lactation nurse and my husband I would give Meredith one more try at nursing and then I was done, she got into the groove. Meredith nursed wonderfully for almost a year before she got too interested in the outside world to nurse. I know that in the beginning I would crawl out of bed to pump and think Is this really worth it? In the end it was. I know it can be very frustrating to keep up with a demanding pumping schedule, escpecially when your baby is still in the hopsital and it seems like there is so much to do and not enough time in the day, but it will be worth it the first time you have the baby home, get up in the middle of the night to feed, and don't have to pump or make bottles. Meredith is 18 months now, perfectly healthy, developing on target, and happy as can be. It is exhausting and frustrating now but it gets better.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    23

    Default Re: Hello

    Hi.
    I had a preemie at 25 weeks and exclusively pumped for 9 months. I had frequent times where my supply would dip and return. I pretty much did everything that was suggested already. I noticed if i was stressed and tired, thats when my supply seemed the lowest. I also ate lots of barley and oatmeal, and tried to drink lots of water during this time and get some sleep.
    We had issues with establishing nursing in the beginning but I kept trying and she started nursing 6 months after she came home. She's been nursing like a pro since then, she's 15 months now.
    Hope your baby is doing well

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