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Thread: Just purchased some new vitamins...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    27

    Default Just purchased some new vitamins...

    Hi, everyone! I just purchased some new vitamins from Whole Foods. I bought the Lactation Support herbs which is very similar to the Mother's Milk Plus, but you don't have to take it as many times a day.

    I thought I would ask for your advice before I start taking them. Can I just start taking them? How long will it take for my milk supply to increase? I start back to work on January 5th, and as of now, I only have one 3-ounce bottle frozen and I want to have enough milk to return to work without concern.

    Also, I'm a busy mom, so if I pump every two hours, how long will it take for my milk supply to increase? Do I need to pump every two hours and feed? Do I have to continue this schedule forever, or just for a few days?

    Help!
    *Jessica*

    Mommy to Tara Elizabeth 5/31/07 and Peter Michael 11/26/08

    Wife to Mike



    Goal: February 26th (We're starting with baby steps.)


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  2. #2

    Default Re: Just purchased some new vitamins...

    Hi! Nice to meet you!

    In order to give you the best answer, I have a couple of questions for you.

    Do you think that you have low supply right now? Are you having to supplement in order for your baby to get enough to eat?

    The reason I ask, is that it's generally not necessary to increase your milk supply or take supplements just to be able to pump for when you're away from your baby after you return to work. Since things work on supply and demand, as long as you pump whenever you would normally be feeding your baby at the breast, most women do just fine and have plenty of milk for their babies.

    In order to build up a little freezer stash for your first few days of work, it might help you to pump in the morning after baby nurses, because generally you have a little extra milk then since babies generally sleep a little longer at night. It can also help to pump after a nursing session while baby's napping, or to pump a little in the evening after you put baby down to bed. I'm sure that if you're not having low supply issues, that you'll be able to get enough breastmilk set aside for you to go back to work without worrying about those first few days.

    If you're not having low supply issues right now, I would suggest you not start any supplements until you see how things go with pumping over the next few weeks. You have a little time yet until you have to go back to work. It seems like having more milk than baby needs would be a good thing, but it can actually cause problems for baby and for you, so it really is best to have just the right amount IYKWIM.

    ETA: In the meantime, I wouldn't pump every 2 hours unless you're having low supply problems right now. Pumping that often if you're currently making the right amount of milk for your baby will only create problems with Oversupply. It can make it difficult for baby to get enough hindmilk, and create gastrointestinal issues like explosive green watery diarrhea in baby. Look more towards having enough breastmilk stored to get you through your first few days of work. The guide is usually 1 to 1.5 ounces of breastmilk for every hour you're away from baby. Usually breastfed newborns will be drinking that from a bottle in 2-3 ounce increments every couple of hours or so on a similar schedule to how you breastfeed at the breast when they're with their caregivers. So you won't really need a whole lot of breastmilk stored to get you started. Pumping at the times when you would've been breastfeeding once you start back to work will provide you with what you need for the days after you use up your supply.
    Last edited by @llli*francis.breadandjam; December 15th, 2008 at 12:41 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: Just purchased some new vitamins...

    Thanks for the great advice! I wish I would have asked before I bought the $25 bottle of supplements.

    What exactly is hindmilk? Is that the milk that comes out at the very beginning that looks a little watered down?

    I'm just worried I'm not going to have a lot of time to pump when I am at work. Thankfully, I teach at a college and we live on campus, so it will be easy for me to come home and feed my DS a few days a week, so I think I will be fine. I am just super paranoid because my milk dried up after only 6 weeks with my daughter, and I'm worried this will happen again. We had to supplement her with formula and I don't want that to happen with my DS.

    Thanks again for the great advice. I will be careful. How will I know when I have an Oversupply?
    *Jessica*

    Mommy to Tara Elizabeth 5/31/07 and Peter Michael 11/26/08

    Wife to Mike



    Goal: February 26th (We're starting with baby steps.)


    209...199......179...169...159...149...139...129

  4. #4

    Default Re: Just purchased some new vitamins...

    Hindmilk isn't the first milk that comes out of the breast, it's the more cream filled milk that comes out last. When you have oversupply, baby gets so much foremilk (the more watery thirst quenching milk) that they don't get enough of the more cream filled hind milk. They fill up too soon on the foremilk. This can cause really fast weight gain, but upset baby's tummy and cause watery green explosive diarrhea.

    The best way for you to have success with pumping while you're at work, is to pump whenever baby would be nursing from you directly.

    For instance, if you nurse your baby right before you walk out the door at say 7am, and she normally nurses every 2 hours, you'd need to make time for a pumping break at 9am and 11am and 1pm and so on. You can also just go home and nurse her at some of those times since you said you live very close. Now if your baby normally nurses every 2.5 or every 3 hours by the time you start back with work, you'd pump at those intervals while you were away from her. As baby gets older, and stretches out feedings a bit, you just alter your pumping schedule to accomodate that and you end up pumping less at work once baby gets older.

    I remember when I first started back to work after the birth of my oldest son, that I had to kind of move nursing sessions a bit at first. For instance, due to my break schedule at work, I needed to nurse baby at a specific time at home before I left so I'd be pumping at the right times at work. Sometimes in the beginning, that meant I had to pick up my sleeping babe and latch him on before he'd woken up fully to get him nursing on the right schedule so to speak. I also found that I needed to have a little frozen breastmilk set aside for those mornings when he didn't want to nurse asap in the morning and needed a little time to wake up instead, as I couldn't change the time when I went to work. After baby gets to be older, it also won't be quite as critical to be pumping right at the times when baby would be nursing. For the first several months though, it's important to keep on track with pumping right when baby would be nursing.

    I went home to nurse him during my lunch time every day, and it was wonderful to be able to do that. It's great to be able to reconnect like that and not have to pump at least once during the work day.

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