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Thread: How can I cut back feedings?

  1. #1
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    Jun 2008
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    Default How can I cut back feedings?

    I am a SAHM to my 27 month old daughter. She still nurses frequently during the day (6+ times), constantly asks when we are out of the house or at home, and wakes up every 1 1/2 hours at night asking to nurse. I tried don't offer, don't refuse, but her frequency of asking is WAY more than I want to be nursing at this point. I try distraction, but she is very focused on "bobbie-nursing" and is extremely difficult to distract. She throws loud, long tantrums if I refuse.

    My husband wants me to wean her. He thinks it will help her sleep if she knows she won't be nursed when she wakes up. UGH. I would really just like some sleep and not to nurse my toddler like a newborn. Any advice?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: How can I cut back feedings?

    Anyone???

  3. #3
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    Default Re: How can I cut back feedings?

    My DD doesn't nurse that much, but still does about 4x per day - she is 15 months. I'm trying to wean also, and get a good nights rest. Along with hubby pushing the weaning and cry it out to sleep method. The only thing that I have read is to drop the least favorite feeding first. Distract them, with playing, going outside, a snack. Don't sit in "your chair" that you nurse in. That's all that I can think of, I have tried some of these and I haven't really had any success. Good luck! Maybe another mommy will jump in to help.
    I am in love with my family.
    I'm Christi wife to Nick of 6 years &
    mommy to my precious little girls Katelin and Madilynn

  4. #4
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    Default Re: How can I cut back feedings?

    I know a lot of people use Jay Gordons method for eliminating night feedings. Have you tried anything like that. It is supposed to be gentle and easier on them.
    Mom to Abigail, born May 3rd, 2007 (self-weaned at 27 mths) and Charlotte, born Nov. 24th, 2009. Both reflux babies and EBF. Charlotte weighs 31 lbs at 26 mths.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: How can I cut back feedings?

    We used the Jay Gordon method with modifications. We were really cosleeping much at that point (only in the early mornings sometimes) and I didn't stick to his timeframe, it took us much longer. But it did work, she not only nightweaned but reduced her night wakings significantly.

    I gotta say, though that that isn't everyone's experience. Night weaning doesn't necessarily mean less night wakings for every child. It does mean, though, that mommy doesn't always have to be the one to respond.
    “We are not put on earth for ourselves, but are placed here for each other. If you are there always for others, then in time of need, someone will be there for you.”
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  6. #6
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    Default Re: How can I cut back feedings?

    Is it the night-waking that you'd like to cut first or day-time feedings?


    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*norasmommy View Post
    We used the Jay Gordon method with modifications. We were really cosleeping much at that point (only in the early mornings sometimes) and I didn't stick to his timeframe, it took us much longer. But it did work, she not only nightweaned but reduced her night wakings significantly.

    I gotta say, though that that isn't everyone's experience. Night weaning doesn't necessarily mean less night wakings for every child. It does mean, though, that mommy doesn't always have to be the one to respond.


    We tried it once at around 14 mo to no avail, then again around 18 mo and it worked.

    As Paige said it doesn't automatically assume night-waking will then cease, but it's a start
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Default Re: How can I cut back feedings?

    We also used a modified version of Dr Gordon's method, I didn't follow his timeline either and it took us about 2 months. For us it improved the night waking a lot, but that's because my DD used to nurse every hour or so, like yours. Now she wants to be held about twice a night but I love it!

    I also think at 27 months you can set some limits, it might involve some tantrums but after a few weeks she'll know when she's allowed to nurse. My DD is 20mo and I work from home, if she asks to nurse and I'm busy, I would tell her "you'll get to nurse at night" then I try to distract her. She sometimes protest at first but then she forgets about it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Default Re: How can I cut back feedings?

    Honestly, at 27mos, I really think it's okay to put your foot down. Especially if she's throwing tantrums. If she knows that she can get away with throwing a tantrum then getting to nurse, she's going to keep doing it. Kids that age are very smart, and they know when they can get away with things like that. Its up to you to teach her that tantrums are NOT going to get her anywhere.

    It'll be hard, I certainly don't deny that, but you REALLY have to be consistent. Make it your policy that you're not going to nurse at night--at this age she has no physical need for it, and can easily go through the night without eating or drinking--and STICK TO IT.

    Personally, I found that once my son was night-weaned and I was getting more sleep, I became a better parent overall, more patient, and with more energy to give to him. It's REALLY worth it, let me tell you!

    I'm all for weaning as gently as possible, don't get me wrong, but sometimes being firm is the best thing for our children. Though they may complain about it, children actually feel more secure when they know the boundaries and see their parents stick to their guns, following through on their word.
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    DD born Jan. 20, '09, 8lbs 14oz

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