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Thread: past breast surgery causing low milk production? help!

  1. #1

    Default past breast surgery causing low milk production? help!

    I had a breast lift and augmentation 7 years ago (when I didn't think I was going to have more children) and I just had a baby boy 6 weeks ago. My milk did come in, and I was breastfeeding, but I wasn't producing much milk. When I would pump, I wouldn't even get out an ounce. We started supplementing, and now we are almost exclusively bottle feeding him. I desperately want to breast feed my baby, but I am back working and I just don't know if my breasts will produce enought milk for him. Does anyone have experience with having breast surgery and trying to breast feed after that? Please help..

  2. #2

    Default Re: past breast surgery causing low milk production? help!

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*bruble73 View Post
    I had a breast lift and augmentation 7 years ago (when I didn't think I was going to have more children) and I just had a baby boy 6 weeks ago. My milk did come in, and I was breastfeeding, but I wasn't producing much milk. When I would pump, I wouldn't even get out an ounce. We started supplementing, and now we are almost exclusively bottle feeding him. I desperately want to breast feed my baby, but I am back working and I just don't know if my breasts will produce enought milk for him. Does anyone have experience with having breast surgery and trying to breast feed after that? Please help..
    . I apologize for not seeing your post right away.

    Yes, mothers who have had surgery can breastfeed. You might find the BFAR website helpful (BFAR means Breastfeeding After Reduction, but the site has great info that can apply to you, too): augmentation and lift

    It sounds like you had a positive breastfeeding experience with your older child(ren), and you know what you're missing with this bonus baby

    As you work to increase your supply, I hope you will be able to remember that nursing is more than nutrition, so putting your baby to your breast has great value regardless of how much milk he receives there. When you don't see the results you want in terms of milk supply, it can be disheartening and cause a mother to feel hopeless if she is focused solely on the milk aspect of nursing. Remember the comfort, emotional security, love and connection that nursing can bring.

    Kudos to you for your commitment to your baby
    Marianne
    LLL Leader

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