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Thread: Can diet changes help with the Lipase issue?

  1. #1

    Default Can diet changes help with the Lipase issue?

    Can diet changes help with the Lipase issue? I saw one person post that removing flaxseed from her diet seemed to eliminate the issue for her, but I could not find anything else on the web about it?

    My milk starts to get funny after 24 hours.....

    Does anyone know of any research done on this topic or have personal experience. It is hard to run personal experiments - a lot of waste....

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    10

    Default Re: IS the gallbladder related to the lapise issue?

    I read the posts from the beginning after researching bad tasting milk. It was helpful to read them all. It seems the whole when to scald is different based on how much bile salt is in the milk. I can go 12 hours so far before having to scald.
    Since bile salts are related to bile and the liver I wondered if anyone has had their gallbladder taken out? I had mine out. I know of one other person in this thread had theres out.
    I might go see a natropath is I can find one on sliding scale.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Default Re: Can diet changes help with the Lipase issue?

    This is a really good question, I'm going to ask around to see if anyone knows anything. It's my understanding that there's not been a whole lot of information about this subject in the field of lactation. There doesn't seem to be a lot to find, in fact if you search "breastmilk lipase" the first hit on google is our thread here on the LLLI boards!
    Jessica
    LLL Leader

    Breastfeeding is an instinctual and natural act, but it is also an art that is learned day by day.

    Visit LLL of Ashburn PM's Blog!

  4. #4
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    Jan 2006
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    18,063

    Default Re: Can diet changes help with the Lipase issue?

    are you eating flax?
    I got into trouble one time saying that flax taste like bugs.
    So I vote you could try it and see what happens...

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Can diet changes help with the Lipase issue?

    This came from asking around about your question!


    Hi Jessica,
    This is a question that has long been of interest to me, too. I do not know of any research specifically looking at lipase levels and diet in humans. However, I have been privy to a correspondence between breastfeeding/human milk researcher Leon Mitoulas and another LLLL [La Leche League Leader]. This was back in 2004 and Dr. Mitoulas may have developed other thoughts on the matter since then.

    What he postulated in 2004 was that higher levels of antioxidants in human milk would probably make the fats more resistant to lipase activity, because the lipid membrane would be more resistant to oxidation. It isn't totally clear whether simply eating more antioxidants in the diet will lead to more antioxidants in a mother's milk. It may be an interplay of consuming antioxidant-rich foods AND avoiding 'bad' foods that use up the antioxidants in the mother's system. Just speculating here.

    Another idea that Dr. Mitoulas raised was the possibility of nutrient deficiencies in the mother's diet, specifically phosphate. There is research on cow's milk where a whole herd had problems with chronic rancidity. It was found that giving the cows more phosphate corrected the problem. The theory was that the milk fat globule membranes, which are partly made of phosphates, were weak because the cows' diet lacked phosphate.

    There are lots of things to consider when it comes to lipase. When women have a 'lipase problem' with stored milk, is it because they have more lipase? Or is their milk more susceptible to its activity -- do they have certain features in their fats, amount of fats, type of fats, etc? Part of it may be as simple as the overall milk fat content of a given batch of milk. ie, a batch that is more foremilk-y may stay fresh longer than a batch that is more hindmilk-y. Another consideration is that lipase tends to be in the skim portion, so when milk has separated into a fat layer and skim layer, the lipase will have less direct contact with the fats than if the milk were mixed. So maybe leaving the milk separated as much as possible & not shaking or swirling it together will lessen the opportunity for lipase to act on the fats. Research on cow's milk indicates that if the fat and whey are separated while milk is still warm, the milk fat globules may be less subject to lipase breakdown.

    After one mom asked me if the nutritional value of her expressed milk was compromised by high lipase activity, I realized the need to explain that lipase is not a defect or fault but a wonderfully functional component of human milk.

    In _Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession_ by Lawrence and Lawrence, 6th ed, 2005, p. 156:
    "Milk fat is almost completely digestible. The emulsion of fat in breast milk is greater than in cow's milk, resulting in smaller globules. Milk lipases play an active role in creating the emulsion, which yields a finer curd and facilitates the digestion of triacylglycerols (TGs). The newborn easily digests and completely uses the well-emulsified small fat globules of human milk. Free fatty acids are important sources of energy for the infant.

    " . . . The lipases in human milk make the free fatty acids available in a large proportion even before the digestive phase of the intestine. . . .

    [Note: this may be one of the reasons why formula-fed babies have been shown to require about 30% more calories for adequate growth compared to thriving breastfed babies. Digestive factors such as lipase ensure that almost all the calories are made available.]

    " . . . Additional lipases in the skim milk fraction are stimulated by bile salts. Bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL) has greater activity and splits all three ester bonds of the triglyceride. This lipase is also stable in the duodenum and contributes to the hydrolysis of the TGs in the presence of the bile salts. . . . BSSL activity is protective against infection by virtue of the production of free fatty acids and monoglycerides, products of fat digestion that have antiinfective properties.

    "The enzyme activity of BSSL is remarkably stable during prolonged storage up to 2 years at either -20C or -70C (-4F to -94F). It has also been noted to be stable at 15C, 25C, and 38C (59F, 70F, and 100F)."

    [Note that freezing the milk does NOT inactivate or even reduce the activity of BSSL.]

    And from _Breastfeeding and Human Lactation_ by Riordan and Auerbach, 3rd ed, 2005, p. 122:

    "In order for human infants to digest fat, adequate lipase activity and bile salt levels must be present. The bile salt-stimulated lipase and lipoprotein lipase present in human milk compensate for immature pancreatic function and for the absence of amylase [necessary for the digestion of starch] in neonates . . . When human milk is frozen or refrigerated, lipase is not affected; however, heating severely reduces lipase activity. Several protozoa - Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, and Trichomonas vaginalis - have been shown in vitro to be killed rapidly by exposure to BSSL . . . "

    We can state with confidence that lipase is a GOOD thing to have in your milk. It can be inconvenient to deal with when the baby is getting expressed milk, but overall, it is a beneficial component.

    You are welcome to share this post in the forums.

    Margaret
    LLLL, 6-year veteran of the PL Department
    Longmont, CO
    Jessica
    LLL Leader

    Breastfeeding is an instinctual and natural act, but it is also an art that is learned day by day.

    Visit LLL of Ashburn PM's Blog!

  6. #6

    Default Re: Can diet changes help with the Lipase issue?

    Thanks for the great response to my question.

    This make me wonder, if i can get by without scalding my milk (it is good for 24 hours), should I avoid scalding it?

    Is my scalded milk more difficult to digest? I almost think that this is a different topic, and I will make a new post.

    Thanks

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