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Thread: Back at work

  1. #1

    Default Back at work

    Hello, I have some questions about pumping and feeding. I had planned on breastfeeding my son for at least 6 months, but I can't pump enough for him to stay satisfied during the day. 2 weeks after he was born, I had to give him formula for a week because I was on antibiotics. I pumped and dumped, but not as much as I should have. After that, my supply decreased and I had to supplement with formula for about 2 weeks.

    Now, I am back at work (LO is 11 weeks) and I am pumping about 5-6oz a day, and I nurse at night. He goes through that in 2 feedings and has 1 or 2 bottles of formula (3 oz each) before I get home. I nurse him before I go to work and get back home in about 10 hours. I read somewhere that BF babies drink about 25 oz a day for the first 6 months of life. Is this true? How can I pump more? Is it possible to overfeed him EBM? Should I tell my MIL not to feed him everytime he puts his hand in his mouth?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    sleepless in ohio
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    2,389

    Default Re: Back at work



    Going back to work can be exhausting and terribly difficult for many reasons. The general rule of thumb is to have 1-1.5 oz/hour you will be seperated from your baby.

    What size nipple is being used on the bottles? I have found the slowest flow nipple to aid in the consumption/over consumption of milk. DD2 is 7.5 months and still uses a size 1, sometimes size 2 if the sitter doesn't have any of the smaller ones clean.

    How often are you pumping? It's generally a good idea to pump at the times you think your LO would nurse. I work 8am-5pm and pump 3x's, essentially every 3 hours.

    You could encourage reverse cycling if you don't mind several night wakings. This just means your LO would get most of his nutrition at night instead of throughout the day. DD2 put herself on this schedule and nurses every 1.5-2 hours at night. It's exhausting, but it won't last forever.

    What kind of pump are you using? Some might be better suited to maintaining/increasing your supply.

    You can try eating oatmeal, in any form, to increase your supply as well as increasing your water intake. If I notice my supply is low in the mornings I drink extra throughout the day and by my 3rd pumping session I'm back up to normal. Drink enough water/fluids so your urine is pale yellow. I also find my pumping output increases, quite a bit, when I have eaten a lot of juicy fruits, like oranges, and veggies.

    You can also try things like Reglan and Fenugreek to increase your supply.
    Sarah- Mommy to Ally (4/16/06) , Katlyn (11/13/07) & Rebekah (10/21/09)
    All three, all natural!

  3. #3

    Default Re: Back at work

    We use size 1 on the nipples. I tried fenugreek and lactation cookies, but neither did anything. What does Regaln do?

    I use the Medela Pump in Style 2x at work. I tried pumping 3x and still got the same amount total. I drink about 64 oz of lemon tea at work. My son nurses every 2-3 hours in the evening and every 3 hours at night. I tried pumping after he eats but he usually doesn't leave anything. I'm going to try to stay in bed with him this Saturday, just nursing and sleeping all day. Hopefully that'll increase my supply.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    sleepless in ohio
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    2,389

    Default Re: Back at work

    Reglan, I think, works the same way as Fenugreek.

    Maybe try switching to water, or at least 1/2 water, instead of the tea. Tea has a lot of caffeine, which I've read can inhibit a letdown when you pump. I can attest to this. On the mornings I drink caffeinated coffee, I have a much harder time letting down to my pump.

    Also, here's a link I should have posted the 1st time. It has some great info on supply & pumping.

    If all else fails, your plan to stay in bed and nurse all day is sure to bring up your supply!!

    ETA: Pumping one side while he's nursing usually gives good pump output.
    Sarah- Mommy to Ally (4/16/06) , Katlyn (11/13/07) & Rebekah (10/21/09)
    All three, all natural!

  5. #5

    Default Re: Back at work

    Thank you!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    NoVA
    Posts
    1,535

    Default Re: Back at work

    I moved your question to pumping

    I read somewhere that BF babies drink about 25 oz a day for the first 6 months of life. Is this true?
    Depending on age, that's about right. Here's a chart with some more info - this will also help with your questions below. Also see this link about pumping and bottlefeeding the breastfed baby.

    How can I pump more?
    Even though when you pumped 3x a day you got the same amount over time you will tell your body to make more. Your milk works on supply and demand. The more you take milk from the breast, the more milk you make. So after a week or two of pumping 3x a day, you will most likely see an increase.

    Is it possible to overfeed him EBM? Should I tell my MIL not to feed him everytime he puts his hand in his mouth?
    YES it is possible to overfeed a baby by bottle. It doesn't matter what's in the bottle. This is because of the method of feeding, not what's being fed. The breast allows the baby to self regulate the flow. A bottle just keeps pumping out the milk till it's empty.
    Over feeding is pretty common, and I'd definitely tell your MIL to try some different soothing techniques!! The two links I provided above will help you determine how much your baby needs while you are away.
    Jessica
    LLL Leader

    Breastfeeding is an instinctual and natural act, but it is also an art that is learned day by day.

    Visit LLL of Ashburn PM's Blog!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    213

    Default Re: Back at work

    Reglan wasn't initially for breastfeeding issues but was found in studies to have a side effect of causing the body to produce more prolactin, the hormone that tells your body to lactate. If your body responds to Reglan and produces more prolactin, then the hormone should attach to the milk glands and stimulate them to produce more milk. This only works when the gland is empty, so there must be consistent nursing or pumping to increase the supply.

    Depression is a serious side effect of Reglan that affects some women. I've been on Reglan for a while now (am weaning off of it now) and have had no problems. But, it's good to be aware of that in case you're already prone to depression or PPD.

    If you can get a prescription for it (it's not approved for lactation support by the FDA), there's Motilium (domperidone). This drug is, however, recommended by the American Association of Pediatricians for this use. It can also be ordered online without a prescription from New Zealand.

    Check both out at http://www.kellymom.com/health/meds/...actagogue.html
    Fran
    Mom to Anna, March 28, 2008

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