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Thread: When do they stop eating so often?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    Default When do they stop eating so often?

    I have an 11 year old, and a 7 week old. I bottle fed my first, and breastfeeding this time around. He's eating every 1.5-2 hours during the day....when do they stop eating so often? I'll be going back to work when he's 12 weeks, and I'm trying to figure out how the bottle feeding (w/ breast milk) will work...how many ounces should be in the bottles? How often will he eat then?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    2,570

    Default Re: When do they stop eating so often?

    Okay, I'll try to help as best I can with your questions.

    Every baby is different as far as how often they feed on demand, but 7 weeks is still very young and I believe it's a myth that they go every 2-3 hours at that age My DD ate more like every 1-2 for a looooong time and now that she's on solids she will finally go 3-4 (if we're keeping busy).

    If you are trying to get a freezer stash built up, I would pump 2oz bottles to start with. (this doesn't mean that you are going to need 2-4oz for every 1.5 hours you are away from her though) In general, most babies eat between 2-4oz at a time and so to decrease waste, you want the bottle to be on the lower end of that at first. The caregiver can give you a better idea of how much your baby is eating and soon you will probably come up with a pumping system that works for you. You can do it!! There is also a forum here for working moms and for pumping/storing, etc.



    Jeanne (my middle name IRL)


    Mommy to two girls (M & M), born Sept. '07 and Sept. '09

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    18,063

    Default Re: When do they stop eating so often?

    there is lots of good info on returning to work here:
    http://www.llli.org/NB/NBworking.html

    pumping here:
    http://www.llli.org/NB/NBpumping.html

    more pumping here:
    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/pumping/milkcalc.html



    you can always talk to your local leader too... she's around to help.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    79

    Default Re: When do they stop eating so often?

    Every 1-2 hours sounds normal to me for that age. I remember things getting a little more spaced out at around 6 weeks, and then definitely around 3 months was more like every 2 hours. There is a little calculator to find out how much to send when you go back to work. It is on kellymom. Sorry, I don't have the link.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    1

    Default Re: When do they stop eating so often?

    My son is 8 1/2 months and still eats every 2 hours during the day, and every 4 hours during the night!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    157

    Default Re: When do they stop eating so often?

    Sorry to be disagreeable, but I think and have read several books stating that most babies CAN go 2 1/2 hours between feedings at this age. In fact, the bad part of feeding so often is that baby learns to be a 'snacker'. Some babies only get the foremilk when feeding so often. I would at least start block feeding to make sure baby is getting plenty of hindmilk. This will make him feel more full as well, and should be able to space feedings more than 2 hours. If you don't know much about block feeding, PM me and I'll send you links that explain.

    HTH!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    3,900

    Default Re: When do they stop eating so often?

    Gentle Reminder: While every poster is welcome to share her own opinions and experiences, please keep in mind that only LLL Leaders (posters with LLL in front of their username) speak for LLL. On this forum, you may read some ideas that seem new or surprising to you. If there's something you disagree with, please do come back and continue to participate. Every mother speaks from her own perspective--we all have different ideas and opinions and we welcome yours (with the expectation that we will all share respectfully). As always, please take what works for your family and leave the rest!



    Please note that the more frequently milk is removed, the fattier the milk is. Milk fat percentage is affected by the degree of emptiness of the breast.

    The milk-making cells in the breasts actually produce only one type of milk, but the fat content of the milk that is removed varies according to how long the milk has been collecting in the ducts and how much of the breast is drained at the moment.http://www.llli.org/FAQ/foremilk.html
    The degree of emptiness of the breast is what research has shown to drive breastmilk fat content, and thus calorie content. The fuller the breast, the lower the fat content of the milk; The emptier the breast, the higher the fat content of the milk http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/mi...e-milkfat.html (non-LLL resource)
    Over time, block feeding signals the body to produce less milk. When milk is left in the breast, a whey protein in milk (Feedback Inhibitor of Lactation) builds up and signals the milk producing cells to slow down production. Block feeding isn't used to prevent "snacking" and could adversely affect a mother's milk production.

    There is a certain whey protein in the milk, called "Feedback Inhibitor of Lactation" (FIL), that begins to build up and concentrate when milk is not removed for a while. This protein needs to be allowed to build up high enough to trigger the breast to cut back milk production. By removing just barely enough milk to be comfortable, but still allowing the breast to be full enough to trigger the "cut back milk production" message, most mothers can decrease milk production without risking plugged ducts or a breast infection.
    http://www.llli.org/FAQ/oversupply.html
    Milk contains a small whey protein called Feedback Inhibitor of Lactation (FIL) – the role of FIL appears to be to slow milk synthesis when the breast is full. Thus milk production slows when milk accumulates in the breast (and more FIL is present), and speeds up when the breast is emptier (and less FIL is present).
    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/milkproduction.html (non-LLL resource)
    Every baby is different, some babies need to feed a little more frequently than others. It's totally normal for a newborn to nurse every two hours. Most babies naturally begin to space their feedings when they reach about 3-4 months of age.

    Babies who breastfeed frequently (as long as they are latched on correctly) tend to get plenty of milk because their mothers' milk supplies have been boosted by the frequent stimulation. Research now shows that restricting the amount of time at the breast and extending the time between feedings can reduce not only a mother's milk supply, but also the fat content of her milk -- resulting in a hungry, crying baby.
    http://www.llli.org/FAQ/frequency.html
    As babies grow and their stomachs become larger, they naturally begin to go longer between feedings and develop more regular feeding patterns. Growth spurts may disrupt the more regular feeding patterns, but they are usually short lived.
    http://www.llli.org/FAQ/frequency.html
    Many mothers are surprised at how quickly and easily human milk is digested (often within 90 minutes of the last feeding). Rather than watching the clock, it is recommended that a mother watch for signs that her newborn is hungry, such as the rooting reflex, chewing/sucking on hands or fingers, or crying. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, crying is a very late cue that your baby is hungry.
    http://www.llli.org/FAQ/schedule.html
    Storage capacity: Another factor that affects milk production and breastfeeding management is mom’s milk storage capacity. Storage capacity is the amount of milk that the breast can store between feedings. This can vary widely from mom to mom and also between breasts for the same mom. Storage capacity is not determined by breast size, although breast size can certainly limit the amount of milk that can be stored. Moms with large or small storage capacities can produce plenty of milk for baby. A mother with a larger milk storage capacity may be able to go longer between feedings without impacting milk supply and baby's growth. A mother with a smaller storage capacity, however, will need to nurse baby more often to satisfy baby’s appetite and maintain milk supply since her breasts will become full (slowing production) more quickly.
    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/milkproduction.html (non-LLL resource)
    Research has shown that healthy, full-term breastfeeding infants have a remarkable ability to regulate their own milk intake when they are allowed to nurse "on cue" and that mothers' rates of milk production are closely related to how much milk their babies take. Regardless of the size of her breasts or the size of her baby, a mother who is responding freely to her baby's appetite will make just the right amount of milk to meet her baby's needs. Babies feed when they are hungry, and slow down and stop feeding when they are full. Some babies will take frequent small feeds, while other babies will take larger feeds less often. In either case, the healthy baby can be trusted to regulate his own milk intake, and in so doing, effectively regulate his mother's supply to fit his specific needs.
    http://www.llli.org/NB/NBJulAug03p126.html
    Remember that nursing is not just about food - it's also warmth, closeness, reassurance, comfort, healing, love... Nursing has been shown to reduce stress and pain in baby, too. If you're feeling that baby shouldn't be hungry again so soon - remember that it's sometimes Mom that baby needs just as much as the milk.
    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/normal/frequent-nursing.html (non-LLL resource)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    157

    Default Re: When do they stop eating so often?

    Sorry about that. I am definitely speaking from my personal experiences and the books I am referring to are not LLL sources. LLL is a wonderful place to get the answers to your questions. That was some great info posted, THANKS!

    FWIW: I meant to add that block feeding can reduce your supply, but I was probably NAK! My bad.

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