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Thread: Rooting.. spitting up... some questions

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    20

    Default Rooting.. spitting up... some questions

    Okay so I have been trying to notice early hunger signs rather than waiting for crying, but does every time my baby start rooting, like her turning her head all over with her mouth open, mean she is hungry? Should I always put her right to the breast when she does this? Do babies do it for other reasons, other than hunger? My husband thinks I may be feeding her too much. Which brings me to my next question... sometimes after she eats she spits up A TON. Like massive amounts of liquid. Is she getting more than her little stomach can handle? Am I feeding her too much? Usually she really only eats every 3-4, sometimes 2-5 hours. But at some feedings she'll nurse at each breast multiple times!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    1,987

    Default Re: Rooting.. spitting up... some questions

    How old is your lo? How often do you feed her in 24 hours? Here's some info on feeding on demand. http://http://www.llli.org/FAQ/frequency.html If your lo doesn't want to nurse either for food or comfort, she won't.

    Sometimes babies need to suck for longer than they need to eat, and if mom has an abundant supply or switches sides when baby is done, then baby can end up with too full of a tummy and spit up. This makes a mess, but doesn't really hurt anything. Spitting up is one way babies regulate how much they nurse.

    It might be that feeding her more frequently (3-4 hours is a pretty long time for a bf baby) might help her to regulate how much she eats and keep your breasts from becoming overly full.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    20

    Default Re: Rooting.. spitting up... some questions

    Thank you for responding! My LO is 2 weeks old today. I thought she was going long between feedings, but I just can't bring myself to wake her up to feed her. My breasts might be getting overly full though, because she barely has to start sucking and if she pulls off milk is squirting every where! It's not painful to me at all though. So should I be waking her to feed more often? And does rooting always mean hunger? Or maybe she just wants to nurse for comfort? Is it okay to do that? Right now anytime she seems hungry at all I feed her. I'd say she's eating about 10 times in 24 hours... maybe. I should keep better track. I've been focusing on poopie diapers, which we have TONS of.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    1,987

    Default Re: Rooting.. spitting up... some questions

    If she is rooting, offer her the breast. If she doesn't want it, she won't take it. Yes, it's fine to nurse for comfort. Breastfeeding is about so much more than just providing food (and this becomes more evident as they get older and you both get more things figured out.) Here's more on that http://www.llli.org/FAQ/spoil.html It might not be a bad idea to get a gage of how often she is nursing just to make sure she is in the 10-12 range. A piece of paper with tick marks for each time you nurse works just fine.

    Do you know if she's regained her birthweight? Usually after that happens you don't have to wake them to nurse.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    NoVA
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    Default Re: Rooting.. spitting up... some questions



    I just wanted to second I-Man's Mommy - right now at this early stage there is no such thing as nursing too much, only nursing too little.
    In some countries babies who are worn all day and who are always with there mother's nurse upwards of 100+ times a day!! Little sip here, little sip there.
    When she's rooting she's looking for the breast, offer it! By doing this your telling her that you are there and will respond to her needs. If sometimes she doesn't want to nurse that's ok, but probably right now most of the time she will.
    It sometimes feels like you are doing nothing but nursing your baby, this is ok and normal!

    Right now your supply is going from being hormonally driven to supply and demand. It might be that you have a little bit of oversupply, which is common in the early weeks. Your baby is the best regulator of your supply, and by nursing on demand you have the best possible chance of keeping up with her later on.
    Jessica
    LLL Leader

    Breastfeeding is an instinctual and natural act, but it is also an art that is learned day by day.

    Visit LLL of Ashburn PM's Blog!

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