Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: What happens to babies in poor countries when mothers can't BF?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    57

    Default Re: What happens to babies in poor countries when mothers can't BF?

    Though it is very common to BF in India many people are not aware that it is a supply and demand. Everyone thinks that you have milk for first few months andsuply gradually goes down after that. So my mother was pleasantly surprised when I took her toa Bfeeding class here. My mom said she BFed me for a year but I was also given cow's milk because she thought she did not have enough milk. My mom said I was crying all the time(may be it was colic and they did not know) So naturally she thought she did not have enough and started supplementing with cow's milk. She said that evn though she had many aunts and other ladies around none of them were knowledgable. She is very supportive of my decision to exclusively BF.

    one more thing - my cousins back in India have all had babies and they are so surprised that I worry so much about weight gain, poops, pees etc. They have all BF successfully without knowing much about it and their babies are thriving

    But I would worry no matter where I am..thats just me!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    6,959

    Default Re: What happens to babies in poor countries when mothers can't BF?

    Quote Originally Posted by dallasmom View Post
    In some countries, if a mother cannot BF her baby, they give cow's milk instead and that's normal. They don't wait for the baby to turn one year before starting cow's milk. And surprisingly these countries have the least number of food allergies!!
    Really? Which countries are these?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Southern Maryland
    Posts
    251

    Default Re: What happens to babies in poor countries when mothers can't BF?

    Thanks for the information. It's very interesting stuff to me!

    (I think of random questions like this one every so often)
    ~*Sherri*~
    Mommy to Allison Rae

    Born 9-18-07 @ 1:18am

    BF for 18 months! Finally weaned!


  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    8,591

    Default Re: What happens to babies in poor countries when mothers can't BF?

    In "poor countries" there isn't a choice. You breastfeed your child. If you can't for some rare reason, then your neighbor/cousin/sister does. Solids are introduced SLOWLY and much later in a child's life (certainly later than the American standard of 4-6 months)--because if they are poor, they feed themselves so they can breastfeed, because they can't afford food for their baby too. While I do believe we do a lot of harm to our bodies and our metabolism, I don't believe that allergies are a metabolic function. I believe that allergies are probably higher in this society because we attempt to protect our infants from every single bacteria/virus/fungi by using harsh cleaners. But that's just a theory and has no scientific foundation that I know of.

    As for cow's milk--a lot of babies were raised on it and did just fine. A lot of babies died from it. Just like in 3rd world countries where mothers are given formula and told its better--then later can't afford it or can't afford good water to mix it with. A lot of babies have died from using formula in those circumstances.

    Cow's mik introduced to an immature gut can cause tiny bleeds, which might explain the above poster's constant crying.


    Erin
    Wife to a grizzly
    Mama to my little deer (12/05) my loving bear cub (9/07--), and our little tiger (3/22/10)
    Born by one c-section and 2 amazing VBACs


    Miles in 2012: 350.5/900 (Actual Miles Ran: 189)
    Miles in 2011: 708.5 (Actual Miles Ran: 509)
    Miles in 2010: 800.5 (Actual Miles Ran: 620)

    January Miles: 37.5/75
    February Miles: 59/75
    March Miles: 42.5/60
    April Miles: 64
    May Miles: 41/70
    June Miles: 59
    July Miles: 39.5

    227.5 miles on my new shoes
    338 miles on my old shoes

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,168

    Default Re: What happens to babies in poor countries when mothers can't BF?

    Cultural anthropologist chiming in here with a couple observations:

    There is a real risk when we look at other cultures, especially ones very different from our own, that we will either judge them negatively just because they are different, or that we will romanticize them as the polar opposite of all our problems, or the "natural human ideal." I see some of both of that going on in this thread, but mostly the romanticizing.

    I think it is really important first of all to recognize that "really poor countries" are not all the same. You have to look at a LOT of different factors, not just economic statistics, to begin to grasp what conditions are like for mothers and babies. And you have to consider the source of the information, what that source's agenda and audience are. Even something apparently simply like comparing statistics (breastfeeding rates, food allergy prevalance, etc.) is enormously complicated when you start asking questions about who collected the data and how and why.

    The other thing I want to say about romanticizing cultures that are very different is that we have a tendency to assume that a very poor or undeveloped country is somehow untouched by modernity and closer to nature than we are. This is a really problematic position. History has been happening all along, all over the world. If we're seeing them on the Discovery Channel (or writing anthropology textbooks about them) -- they've been touched by modernity and are in fact part of the very same world we live in, just in a very different relationship to the structures of power and privilege that have such a heavy impact on how we live our lives, feed our babies etc.

    A particularly problematic stance I often hear in U.S./European lactivist discussion is that poor women or women in poor countries never fail at breastfeeding or all nurse their babies for years or just naturally intuitively delay solids etc etc. This is simply not true. Lots of things can and do happen to interfere with breastfeeding. In our culture, overmedicalization can and does cause a lot of problems -- but in other cultures, lack of access to medical care, malnutrition, inadequate housing, no clean water -- these are the things that disrupt breastfeeding and kill babies and sometimes mothers.

    Also, even where mommas and babies are healthy and breastfeeding should be going fine, cultural beliefs can get in the way just as they do here. I think Michel Odent has written about the nearly universal human belief that colostrum is dangerous or bad. In culture after culture we find traditional practices that involve starving newborns or feeding them something else until the mother's milk comes in -- which is completely incompatible with current recommended and evidence-based practice that looks at how colostrum helps clear out the meconium, is super-packed with antibodies, and also how critical early and frequent nursing is to get mom's milk supply established.

    We are all human beings. That means we all have culture and live within societies. This cultural and societal stuff impacts mother-baby interaction including breastfeeding, no matter who or where you are. It is different in different places, to be sure, but no actual culture represents the "ideal" or the "right" way to be.
    --Rebecca

    -----
    "How ... can politics have anything to do with breastfeeding? When health, profits, and the empowerment of women are at stake, how could politics not be involved?
    Extraordinary changes in the way power is allocated in the world would be necessary for breastfeeding to flourish in this world."
    (Penny Van Esterik, 2008. Emphasis added.)

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Not around here as much :(
    Posts
    12,132

    Default Re: What happens to babies in poor countries when mothers can't BF?

    Quote Originally Posted by My2Girlies View Post
    Exactly! When I started introducing new foods to my girls, and whenever anybody would tell me to introduce one food at a time, blah, blah, blah, I always told them that my girls were too poor to have allergies. Of course I was careful with foods, but I hated their condensending (sp?) attitudes.
    I'm so sorry you experienced such strident individuals - especially when it came to feeding your child. But please know it is, for some babies, of utmost importance to be that ginger when introducing solids. Thankfully your child didn't experience any issues


    Quote Originally Posted by desperate View Post
    Yes if there is access to cow's milk, they give it. My sister was raised with cow's milk from birth. I think the reason for the increase in food allergies in this country is all the chemicals/preservatives etc. in food that we eat which find their way into the growing fetus and upset its metabolism. That's my theory.

    Natural things don't cause unnatural responses such as food allergies at least not as many cases as we have in this country.
    But - how is cows milk "natural" for humans? It hasn't always been part of our (humans) diet. Those who tolerate it have different make -ups than those who can't.


    Quote Originally Posted by dallasmom View Post
    In some countries, if a mother cannot BF her baby, they give cow's milk instead and that's normal. They don't wait for the baby to turn one year before starting cow's milk. And surprisingly these countries have the least number of food allergies!!
    I, too, am curious about this... was this something you have research on? I'd love to read more about it - I am super interested in this and wonder what other factors may be involved.


    FTR - my son is allergic to milk. Not intolerant, not sensitve, not lactose intolerant. Allergic. We have to take our epi pen with us 90% of the time we leave the house. It's not how I dreamt of having to spend his infancy and toddler years - combing over every ingredient of everything - fighting with managers at restaurants etc.
    But we've settled in and I've come to realize, the world won't adjust for us - we have to adjust to it.

    And since my whole post has been completely off the original topic - I'll stop here
    Last edited by Number3; March 14th, 2008 at 10:58 AM.
    Click here to find an LLL leader near you...or call 1 877 4 LA LECHE for help now.

    "No one can make you feel inferior without your consent."
    Eleanor Roosevelt


    "Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail."
    Emerson


    Ban the bags. ......... Watch your language. ....... Help keep Dr Newman's clinic open!

    We demand that our childcare providers are CPR certified... why don't we demand the same of ourselves! Get certified!

    I lost 22 lbs in 8 months... with a bit of determination and common sense information from this book.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,197

    Default Re: What happens to babies in poor countries when mothers can't BF?

    Food allergies are so foreign to me because until I came to the US 9 years ago I had never heard of them. I had never seen anyone who was allergic to anything. In fact until I came to this forum I had never heard anyone who is allergic to cow's milk. And the only difference I can think of between my country and the US in terms of food is the amount of processed food filled with weird sounding ingredients (mono-something something, dextrose something something, yellow 5 something something....) consumed here (including infant formula). That's why I thought they may be the culprit for the amount of food allergies here. It's just a theory of course.
    I think cow's milk is natural. It may not be produced for human consumption in nature but what is (except BM). Eggs are for reproduction of chickens, meat is living beings there to live for themselves, milk of course is for the calves and cubs of mammals, vegetables are again living beings there to live for themselves, fruits are for the reproduction of the trees, etc. etc. Since we cannot have the original food that is the only thing produced for human consumption forever (that is BM of course), we gather and produce whatever we can consume from nature and in my opinion as long as we don't process them with weird chemicals and substances they are natural.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    777

    Default Re: What happens to babies in poor countries when mothers can't BF?

    Quote Originally Posted by desperate View Post
    Food allergies are so foreign to me because until I came to the US 9 years ago I had never heard of them. I had never seen anyone who was allergic to anything. In fact until I came to this forum I had never heard anyone who is allergic to cow's milk. .
    My son is allergic to cow's milk, he used to react to it every time I drank it when he was few months old, when I went to India this Feb peaple there COULDNT BELIVE that he is allergic to cow's milk, many thought I was just tryin to be funny, some of them didnt take me seriosuly, one of them even gave him a littel milk just to test him and when she saw the rash she belived me and she told others that my son is REALLY allergic to cows milk (I know thats mean), the bottom line is MANY of them NEVER heard of such a thing. Allergis are SO rare in India as well as where I am living (saudi Arabia).

    Proud Mother to Ziyad, born naturally, November 3 2006

    Breastfed for 26 months and still co-sleeping
    .
    "Do more than belong, participate. Do more than care, help.

    Do more than believe, practice. Do more than be fair, be kind.

    Do more than dream, work!."

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •