Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Sunny Side Up?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    New Orleans, LA
    Posts
    5,036

    Default Sunny Side Up?

    When would be an appropriate age to introduce fried eggs served sunny side up to my toddler? I am not sure about the runny yolk.

    Thanks!
    Mother - Wife - Artist - Cook - Writer - EnvironMENTAList - Cloth Diaperer (but we are soooo done with diapers) - Organic Health Nut...I'm sure there's more.

    DD1 - 12/15/05 Breastfed for 16.5 months
    DD2 - 8/6/07 Breastfed for 3 whole years and 3 little, extra days.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,134

    Default Re: Sunny Side Up?

    sounds messy!!!!!!!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    New Orleans, LA
    Posts
    5,036

    Default Re: Sunny Side Up?

    Quote Originally Posted by jkmomof4 View Post
    sounds messy!!!!!!!!!
    ...probably, but I love dipping my toast in the runny yolk. I'm thinking my dd would enjoy it just as much.

    *bump*
    Mother - Wife - Artist - Cook - Writer - EnvironMENTAList - Cloth Diaperer (but we are soooo done with diapers) - Organic Health Nut...I'm sure there's more.

    DD1 - 12/15/05 Breastfed for 16.5 months
    DD2 - 8/6/07 Breastfed for 3 whole years and 3 little, extra days.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    253

    Default Re: Sunny Side Up?

    I'd have reservations about giving a runny yolk to a toddler just because the very young, the elderly etc are most vulnerable to salmonella.

    You can buy pasturised eggs in the shell these days that are perfectly safe to eat raw. That'd be a good compromise. Maybe you can source them wherever you are?

    http://safeeggs.com/storelocator-30c.html

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    8,591

    Default Re: Sunny Side Up?

    The only problem with salmonella is that it exists on the outside of the shell. If you give your eggs a quick boil, (a minute or 2) its okay to eat the egg raw. I don't do that, and we still give Haylee overeasy or ssu eggs whenever we eat them, and have been doing so since we intro'd eggs. She loves toast starutated in butter and egg yolk!


    Erin
    Wife to a grizzly
    Mama to my little deer (12/05) my loving bear cub (9/07--), and our little tiger (3/22/10)
    Born by one c-section and 2 amazing VBACs


    Miles in 2012: 350.5/900 (Actual Miles Ran: 189)
    Miles in 2011: 708.5 (Actual Miles Ran: 509)
    Miles in 2010: 800.5 (Actual Miles Ran: 620)

    January Miles: 37.5/75
    February Miles: 59/75
    March Miles: 42.5/60
    April Miles: 64
    May Miles: 41/70
    June Miles: 59
    July Miles: 39.5

    227.5 miles on my new shoes
    338 miles on my old shoes

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    253

    Default Re: Sunny Side Up?

    The only problem with salmonella is that it exists on the outside of the shell. If you give your eggs a quick boil, (a minute or 2) its okay to eat the egg raw.
    Not anymore unfortunately


    From the CDC

    How eggs become contaminated

    Unlike eggborne salmonellosis of past decades, the current epidemic is due to intact and disinfected grade A eggs. Salmonella enteritidis silently infects the ovaries of healthy appearing hens and contaminates the eggs before the shells are formed.

    Most types of Salmonella live in the intestinal tracts of animals and birds and are transmitted to humans by contaminated foods of animal origin. Stringent procedures for cleaning and inspecting eggs were implemented in the 1970s and have made salmonellosis caused by external fecal contamination of egg shells extremely rare. However, unlike eggborne salmonellosis of past decades, the current epidemic is due to intact and disinfected grade A eggs. The reason for this is that Salmonella enteritidis silently infects the ovaries of healthy appearing hens and contaminates the eggs before the shells are formed.

    Although most infected hens have been found in the northeastern United States, the infection also occurs in hens in other areas of the country. In the Northeast, approximately one in 10,000 eggs may be internally contaminated. In other parts of the United States, contaminated eggs appear less common. Only a small number of hens seem to be infected at any given time, and an infected hen can lay many normal eggs while only occasionally laying an egg contaminated with the Salmonella bacterium.
    http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dbmd/disea.../salment_g.htm

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    8,591

    Default Re: Sunny Side Up?

    Still sounds pretty rare. About as rare as getting bad beef or chicken. I think we will continue to eat ours ssu.

    Erin
    Wife to a grizzly
    Mama to my little deer (12/05) my loving bear cub (9/07--), and our little tiger (3/22/10)
    Born by one c-section and 2 amazing VBACs


    Miles in 2012: 350.5/900 (Actual Miles Ran: 189)
    Miles in 2011: 708.5 (Actual Miles Ran: 509)
    Miles in 2010: 800.5 (Actual Miles Ran: 620)

    January Miles: 37.5/75
    February Miles: 59/75
    March Miles: 42.5/60
    April Miles: 64
    May Miles: 41/70
    June Miles: 59
    July Miles: 39.5

    227.5 miles on my new shoes
    338 miles on my old shoes

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •