Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: What's the real scoop on solids?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    23

    Default What's the real scoop on solids?

    I love my ped because she says wait until 6 months to start solids, and she did not freak out that my dd was only 14 lbs 3 oz at her 6 month checkup. She said it is just in her genes to be tiny since I was always in the 5th percentile, and she is very strong, meeting milestones, etc.

    BUT, she also said dd should be eating EIGHT TBSP of cereal per day. I can barely get 2-3 in her! She said it is for iron supplementation. Also, in the handout she gave me, it said "If you are bf'ing and no longer taking prenatal vitamins, iron supplementation may be necessary." I did not know the iron from prenatals increased the amt of iron in your milk. I thought the nutrition content of milk was pretty much the same around the world based on studies I have heard of, even if the mom is malnourished the baby gets it first.

    And she said dd could eat 1-4 JARS of baby food per day.

    Most mainstream parenting books now even say that breastmilk or formula is the MAIN source of nutrition for the first year, and solids are for practice with textures, tastes, and swallowing.

    So if it is just for practice, why stuff her with more food than my 3 year old eats in a day? And do the prenatals really help with her iron levels?

    I usually just ignore advice that doesn't sound right but I have really valued this ped's opinion in the past. Plus ds had very low iron from 9-18 months and I don't want that to happen to dd as well. Any wisdom here???

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    265

    Default Re: What's the real scoop on solids?

    I say go with what your gut says...I am still exclusively BFing my 10 month old, he gets a bite of something every few days, but pretty much only BM. I love my sons PCP, and I value his opinion, but that is it. He has an opinion. He most definitely does not agree with all I do, and I don't agree with all his advice either. I have proven to him that I am a good parent who makes good decisions, therefor he does not argue with me. He would step in if he felt my childs life was in danger, I do know that, but he is great at seperating his personal feelings from his job. Most people cannot do that (I know I can't!) He is the only doctor that we see in the practice. The rest of them tell me what I am doing wrong (co-sleeping, breastfeeding, wearing my baby, feeding on demand, blah blah blah).

    Go with your gut, you always should!

    HTH!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    893

    Default Re: What's the real scoop on solids?

    My daughter is 9 months old and I wondered the same thing about the iron levels (I'm going to have them checked or request it at her next visit on the 20th) All of her doctors pushed me to start cereal at 4 months for her reflux but she refused it. She still refuses foods and I'm not worried about it due to she is gaining weight just fine and is content with just bf.

    I guess I got lucky, our pedi is totally ok with co sleeping, baby wearing and other items that some get their feathers ruffled about.

    Marcie
    Mom of Madeline

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,813

    Default Re: What's the real scoop on solids?

    "If you are bf'ing and no longer taking prenatal vitamins, iron supplementation may be necessary."
    Vitamins and minerals:
    Breastmilk:
    Better absorbed, especially iron, zinc, and calcium.
    Iron is 50-75% absorbed
    Contains more selenium (an antioxidant) than formula
    Formula:
    Less absorbed
    Iron 5-10 percent absorbed
    Vitamins and minerals in breastmilk enjoy a higher bioavailability; a greater percentage is absorbed. To compensate, more is added to formula, which makes it harder to digest.

    The iron levels of an infant should be check at 9 months just to make sure everything is OK.

    Breastfeed your baby as long as possible. Once upon a time it was believed that breastfed babies needed iron supplements because human milk was low in iron. Yet, breastfed babies studied at four to six months of age had a higher hemoglobin than infants who were fed iron-fortified formula. Breastfed babies have been found to have sufficient iron stores for nine months or longer. Human milk remains an important part of baby's diet, even after the introduction of solids.

    BUT, she also said dd should be eating EIGHT TBSP of cereal per day.
    And she said dd could eat 1-4 JARS of baby food per day.
    Your daughter will eat as much or as little as she wants. All babies are differentes, there's not a MUST EAT rule, your baby will let you know. Follow her cues.

    How much food should I offer?


    If your baby eagerly accepts the first fingertipful of food, offer a little more the next time. At these first feedings, baby may actually swallow only a teaspoon or two of food. Gradually increase the amount you give baby until you are offering a quarter-cup or more at a time. Remember, your initial goal is to introduce your baby to the new tastes and textures of solid foods, not to stuff baby. As with all areas of development, babies take two steps forward and one step back. Expect erratic eating patterns. Baby may take a couple tablespoons one day and only a teaspoon the next. Baby may devour pears and refuse bananas one day, then the next day ignore the pears and gobble down the banana. That's all part of the feeding game. Relax and realize that you can't control your child's every mouthful. Don't force-feed a baby. Know when enough is enough. (Your baby knows.) Observe stop signs:
    • Baby purses lips, closes mouth, and turns head away from approaching spoon.
    • Baby leans away from the advancing spoon, uninterested or wanting to avoid the food entirely.
    • Leaning toward the food or grabbing the spoon or hand of the feeder indicates a desire for more.
    NUTRITIP: Milk Plus Consider solid foods an addition to, not a substitute for, breastmilk or formula, which are more nutritionally balanced than any solid food. This food fact is especially important for breastfeeding babies. For a breastfeeding baby, it's best to start solids slowly, so that they don't become a substitute for the more nutritious breastmilk. Also, solids fed at an early age can interrupt the supply-and-demand cycle, resulting in decreased milk production.


    I love my sons PCP, and I value his opinion, but that is it. He has an opinion. He most definitely does not agree with all I do, and I don't agree with all his advice either.
    Totally agree with you!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,813

    Default Re: What's the real scoop on solids?

    Marcie:

    All of her doctors pushed me to start cereal at 4 months for her reflux but she refused it.
    I'm glad your little one refused it, she knows what's better for her!

    Cereal might actually make reflux worse. The more food and the longer is in the stomach, the more chances it haves to acidify and go up the baby esophagus making reflux worse. Formula and cereal take longer to digest making breast milk the best option for a baby with reflux.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    893

    Default Re: What's the real scoop on solids?

    That was my thought on it. They had her on Bethancol which was to speed up the digestive system (much like Reglan without the side effects) and then they wanted her on cereal, to me it sounded like it counteracted each other. My husband pushed because the doctors were pushing so we tried it for 10 days, offering it to her, she refused it in a screaming fit everytime till he finally said to stop, he couldn't take it anymore (I made him be there and hold her as I attempted to feed her). She still will not eat anything at 9 months old (today actually) and bf every 45 mins to 1 1/2 (since her surgery, fundoplacation and g-button - used for burping only) she nurses more often due to her tummy is smaller. She was on iron supplement for the first 3-4 months (Fer-in-sol) and bloodwork at the children's hospital on one of her many admissions showed her iron level was fine and we stopped giving it to her. I've heard the same thing though about iron in bm is not enough for baby.

    Marcie
    Mom of Madeline

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    130

    Default Re: What's the real scoop on solids?

    A couple of random thoughts for you.... Bacteria in the intestine require iron to reproduce/grow. While breastmilk is a moderate source of iron, what is there is very well absorbed and is in a form that (bad) intestinal bacteria can't use.

    If you or your doctor are concerned about your baby's iron levels, just have them checked. We did have a mom in our Group who dealt with apparent low iron in her baby; she pushed high-iron foods but her child wasn't too fond of them. A couple of months later her baby's iron levels were fine. She thinks her baby was going through a growth spurt-- she thinks that made it look like the iron levels were low, but they evened out after the growth spurt. (Just theory here, but something to think about).

    I highly recommend the book "My Child Won't Eat!" by Dr. Carlos Gonzalez. He emphasizes that children should *never* be forced to eat. Providing access to a variety of nutritious food (no sugar!) is all that is needed for babies and young children. They will eat what they need, regardless of how much we think they should eat. (I remember when my son was two, I could swear he lived on breastmilk and air! ) He says be wary of sugar-- it will interfere with the child's natural ability to determine what he should eat.

    Go with your gut (ha ha) and trust your baby's instincts. The food your baby needs most in the first year is your milk.

    Dawn

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    323

    Default Re: What's the real scoop on solids?

    Look, everyone wrote great stuff and I totally agree.
    I just have to be harsh, I'm in that kinda mood, so fogive me if I sound offensive, coz I DONT mean to be...

    your pedi is TRIPPING
    simple as that. the AMA and the WHO recommend differently. your baby doesnt need all that food if youre bfing and doesnt need iron supplementing unless she tests to be very low. its an easy test, why not do one?
    Try for a second opinion, I'd say.
    If your baby is developing and growing fine, and bfing regularly, then she's fine, no added food required.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    18,063

    Default Re: What's the real scoop on solids?

    my baby had low iron, and we went to see a doctor at the local childrens hopsital and her advice was to wean and give formula company iron drops.
    I forget what they were called. My dd would just spit them out.
    I talked to one of the other moms in my lll group whos hubby is a natural ciropractor doctor and asked what they were doing with their dd who was about the same age as my dd..
    They were giving her flora dix.. its iron that comes from plant you get it at the health food store.
    After starting that my dd's iron got high faster then the doctors thought that it could. She still didn't eat a lot of solid foods, mostly meat and hard boiled eggs.

    I was so upset at the doctor I knew that when she told me that after 6 months breastmilk wasn't good for the baby anymore I wouldn't be listing to anything else she had to say.
    My dd is now 3 and she is as healthy as ever, and her iron levles are fine.
    My doctors office uses the whole blood test they don't do a finger prick just so you know if you as they will draw lots of blood and thats just hard on a baby and it was even harder on me.
    They do finger pricks at the wic office and thats free if you have low income you might want to check that out. Finger pick is much beter than the full blood test.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •