Quote Originally Posted by haven View Post
Hello. I have a darling 15-day old boy named Roger. He is a voracious little nurser - he latched on 1 hr. after birth, but it wasn't quite right. I have had cracked, scabbed, bleeding, infected nipples since. His pedi prescribed me 2 ointments which have helped TREMENDOUSLY - but both still have deep cracks just at the top.
Have you seen an IBCLC and/or your local LLL Leader?

Quote Originally Posted by haven View Post
I can deal with the cracks, but my prolem now is that he fights latching on every time now. To the points where he'll turn his head away, scream and flail his "fists of fury". He doesn't really open his mouth wide enough for a good, deep latch, so I try to quickly get him on mid-wail. Once he has the nipple in his mouth - look out. Like I said, he's voracious. I can hear him gulping down mouthfuls of milk. Sometimes he loses suction and "clicks" (ouch); sometimes he starts coughing and choking and I pull him off and burp him, but this upsets him - he's hungry! I probably re-latch him an average of 10x per feeding, and he doesn't really suckle for all that long (10-20 min. total). There are times when after 5 re-latchings, he'll fall asleep (and he's only "eaten" for, like, 5 min.) I was worried that he wasn't getting enough, but he wets and poops a lot. I think he has gained weight (he looks thicker). I just don't know if/when I can expect the mealtime fights to subside. It's painful to have him latch on like a pirahna, but I can deal with it. I love it when the latch is decent and he looks up into my eyes, and he seems content . It makes all of the hitches worth it. I just wish I could get it more on an even keel.
The gulping, clicking, coughing, choking, grimacing, and latch sound like you could be dealing with oversupply.

Here are two helpful resources:
http://www.wiessinger.baka.com/bfing...e/gulping.html
http://www.lalecheleague.org/FAQ/oversupply.html


I would suggest trying lots of calming techniques before feeding, such as rocking, swaying, and skin to skin contact.

Other tips:
*Nurse frequently--smaller, more frequent meals mean more hindmilk for baby and less of a "waterfall" rush from the breast
*Watch the baby, not the clock. Finish the first breast first.
*Try nursing semi-reclined so that the milk flow is working against gravity.
*If baby starts coughing and choking, take him off and allow the milk to spray into a towel. Then latch back on.
*If your milk production is substantial, consider block nursing to slow down production levels. See the links above for more detailed information.
*Call your local LLL Leader for support
*Post in the "too much milk!" section (scroll down the forum listings) for support!