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Thread: Third try, one inverted nipple

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Default Third try, one inverted nipple

    My third child is due in two weeks and I really want to breastfeed. With my first two children things started really well but after a few weeks the baby absolutely refused to nurse on one side. I have a partially inverted nipple on that side and I seem to have decreased production on that side from the start. I thought maybe a shield would help but I am wondering if I should use one on both sides so as not to introduce a reason for preference. I feel so distraught just thinking about how frustrating, miserable and devastating my last two attempts at this were but I want the best for my baby...any advice would be so appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Nov 2006
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    Default Re: Third try, one inverted nipple

    Hi, welcome to the forum.

    The lower producing side with the inversion is easy to explain. It could be a number of different things, but most likely if your baby was unable to latch properly it was also unable to remove milk efficiently. Because a great part of milk production is communication between the breast and the baby, if only a little milk is removed, the breast thinks only a little is required. It is a cyclical thing.
    Your idea of using a breast shield has worked for many women. Here is an article about it.
    If your last babies latched with no problem on one side, allow that side to remain free of a shield. In fact there is evidence to suggest that plenty of women successfully nurse with one side only. you have only to look at mothers with twins to see that it's possible.

    At two weeks before your due date now is a good time to call your local leader!

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Third try, one inverted nipple

    I would save nipple shields as a last resort. They can have some really negative consequences (for some people, not all - you just don't know which group you will fall into). For drawing out an inverted nipple, you want to use the "breast sandwich" technique to smoosh the breast/nipple into a shape that's easier for the baby to take. A good suck will draw it out in no time.

    But also keep in mind, if worse came to worse, you CAN nurse just fine on the one side alone! Many women have and do make it work. All is not lost if the baby has trouble latching on that side. You will do great!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Default Re: Third try, one inverted nipple

    try and avoid the sheild if you can, sometimes its hard for them to wean off it...
    This baby might be a totaly diffent experience then your older kids.
    heres some good links that might help
    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/concerns/....html#inverted
    http://www.llli.org/FAQ/flat.html
    http://www.llli.org/NB/NBnippleproblems.html


    do give your local leader a call she can help!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Default Re: Third try, one inverted nipple

    I am new to bf but I did want to add to this thread. I have been reading a lot on the negative side of using the shields. However I have to say they where a great comfort to me when I thought I had no other options. They helped keep me breastfeeding and for that I am really greatful. Also I have noticed that my son really prefers to not have the shield. So weaning him is really easy I am the one who is at times in pain with out the shield. You can also consider using the shield for the first few minutes, then take it off. At that point your nipple with be "out" quite a bit, and your little one may have an easier time latching on properly.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Default Re: Third try, one inverted nipple

    I also have one inverted nipple and have successfully BFed for almost 10 months now. What I was advised to do was a couple weeks before the baby is born to start wearing the shield on the inverted side a few minutes a couple times a day. This helped to draw the nipple out so the baby would have an easier time with it. I notice that this did help. When it came time to nurse if that nipple wasn't already out I would put the shield on to draw out the nipple, take the shield off, and nurse. This really helped me, and now my nipple is rarely inverted at all. Eventually the nursing should help break down the tissue that is built up around the nipple. I don't know if that makes sense but that is the best way I can explain it.

    I wish you luck and I'm sure that with some determination and planning you'll reach more of you BFing goals this time around.

    ETA: I just wanted to make it clear that I didn't really used the shield to nurse, we tried but DS hated it so I don't have any advice on using shields to actually nurse with. I just used it to draw out the nipple.

    Amy married to my bestfriend since 10/30/04

    Proud SAHM to DS born 2/17/07 and DD born 9/11/08 Both weaned together 11/2011
    Currently milk, peach, peanut and tree nut free. DD has outgrown her wheat, cheese, egg, garlic, and citrus allergies

  7. #7
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    Dec 2006
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    Default Re: Third try, one inverted nipple

    I think that if it's going to ease your mind and make you feel more confident to have this as a back-up plan, then that's great. And I totally agree that even in the extremely unlikely event that you cannot nurse at all from that side, you only need one breast to breastfeed. It'll be okay. Have you hooked up with a local LLL meeting, or anything like that? Getting a support system in place can make all the difference.

    I have very flat nipples (or actually I should say had, since DD remodeled them for me ) and for whatever reason she would not latch on at all in the beginning. I was really, really stressed out by the second day. Finally I was given a nipple shield, and she latched on and nursed with that until about a week later, when I finally got her to latch without it and then weaned her off of it. So, my experience with the nipple shield was very, very good. It provided a quick solution to a very distressing problem, and I was able to wean DD off of it quickly. The key is to keep trying at each and every nursing session to get the baby to nurse without it.

    I also wanted to mention that some of the older literature that's very critical of nipple shields comes from a time in which they were thicker and made of rubber. This made them more problematic than the ultra-thin silicon ones that are sold now.
    Erin (32), breastfeeding CLW, knitting cloth-diapering crocheting, heirloom tomato-growing philosophizing poker-playing feminist artist mama to my 19 month old daughter! Baby #2 due January 2009.


  8. #8

    Default Re: Third try, one inverted nipple

    Just popping in with a gentle reminder Nipple shields should be used only under the guidance of an IBCLC or LLL Leader.

    Jen
    "Mothers are designed to be available to their babies--to help them make the transition into this big, wide world. To teach them to trust, and love, and feel good about being alive."
    --Elizabeth N. Baldwin, Esq., So I Nursed Him Every 45 Minutes

    Click here to find your local LLL Group
    How to tell if your breastfed baby is getting enough milk!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Default Re: Third try, one inverted nipple

    Hi. I think I'm probably in the same state as you! Due to birth my second baby in three weeks or so and have one inverted nipple, one flat nipple. The experience I had with my first child was one I do not wish to repeat. The midwives in hospital had no idea what to do to help me - I think they just gave up in the end and the breast feeding Counsellor I contacted was useless, (not LLL by the way!!!!)... I gave up after four days and bottle fed - my baby didn't latch or such once, (the birth was a planned home birth but ended up induced in hospital at 39 weeks - post natal care was shocking so not the best circumstances really). So devastating.
    I think I might be too late in writing this, but this preg I've used Medela nipple formers for the last five months, and the Avent Nipplette for the first three months. I think the Medela product has been the best - it's like a breast shell but ventilated and with a smaller hole which has really drawn my nipples out.
    At birth, I intend to utilise nipple shields IF NECESSARY- Medela ones which come in small or large size, (had a go with some standard ones last time - they were huge and totally useless!!!) and have a cut out bit at the top so the baby can still smell you and not just a plastic nipple shield!
    Anything that can help should make you feel better.
    My stance is that I'm going to do what feels right for me and my baby whether that entails feeding using nipple shields or not. Waiting to know whether other people condone your methods or not just leads to confussion - you know the emotional grief you face when you can't feed your baby - it's dire.
    At least we are both here accessing excellent advice and information.
    Have you thought about a doula at the birth, or a peer mentor with experience relevant to you who will be more sensitive than the midwives? (I suppose this depends on where you're giving birth and what the staff are like?).
    Good luck.
    I hope you are successful and that you have a wonderful experience. Please post after the birth and let us know what happened, how you're feeling etc.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    31

    Talking Re: Third try, one inverted nipple

    I just wanted to say that I know what you mean, as I have one inverted nipple as well. My LO is now 9.5 months and we have settled on breastfeeding from one breast. She really did not like the inverted one so after trying and trying and trying (and stressing and expressing and crying and worrying )to get her to suck from both sides even though the inverted side was not producing that much at all ( probably due to her dislike of it, it also seemed to stick to the roof of her mouth which distressed her further!!) I gave up on that side and since about 2-3 months after she was born, we have happily been feeding from one side only. Her weight has been great in the 91st percentile (UK standards, really big!!!) so I know it has done her no harm whatsoever. My breasts r slightly wonky but not obviously so!!!Ultimately, I am saying if worst comes to worst, dont stress it, just use the one side. Starting breastfeeding can be difficult enough especially if you are expecting there to be a problem, so try not to worry about it. Just focus on the big goal which is to breastfeed, it doesnt matter whether with a shield, without a shield, on one breast or 2. I love breastfeeding now!!

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