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Thread: What if your milk doesn't come in?

  1. #1
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    Default What if your milk doesn't come in?

    I have posted about a friend, who now is pumping, bf, adn supplementing, bc her LO is 9 days old and she is not really producing any milk. maybe a half ounce combined both breasts. Is her milk in and just not in plenty or has it still not come in? What can she do? She seems really committed, any help/experiences? I have tried to look it up but haven't seen anything. Thanks!

  2. #2

    Default Re: What if your milk doesn't come in?

    I've not heard of anyone's milk not coming in. Pumping is not always an accurate account of how much milk we make. I used to pump and not get much. But I EBF until 6 months when we started solids. For the first few weeks I would nurse then pump for about 5-10 mins both sides to help increase my supply. Tell your friend to try that. She can also take fenugreek (it is a capsule from health food stores) this helped increase my supply also. 3 1500 mgs 3 times a day.
    Is there a lactation consultant at her dr or hospital? Some places will weigh baby, then you nurse and weigh baby again to tell exactly how much baby is getting. I did this and was put at ease to know how much exactly she was getting. Then I knew she was getting enough. Give her hugs and good luck to her!
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  3. #3
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    Default Re: What if your milk doesn't come in?

    As the previous poster said- the pump isn't a good indicator of what the baby could extract... Babies are much more efficient! Can she get the baby to the breast more?!?! that should reallllly help - and a call to a local LLL leader or IBCLC is a good idea.
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  4. #4
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    Default Re: What if your milk doesn't come in?

    Thanks ladies, I did tell her that and she is nursing before pumping and she did take her LO to a LC and they did a before and after weigh and her LO got nothing I had never heard about someones milk not coming in either . . . i dont get it . . .

  5. #5
    @llli*emama is offline Shares Widely And Frequently
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    Default Re: What if your milk doesn't come in?

    Yes! Whatever you do, DON'T use the pump to tell you how much milk is there. Some women can BF for hours but can only pump 1 oz or so. I can't pump a lot and I've been BFing for months.

    The real test is making sure the LO isn't dehydrated (sunken fontenel, e.g.), good diaper output (what is it? 6-8 wet diapers a day?) and weight gain. It always seems nebulous at first but it's the only way to tell.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: What if your milk doesn't come in?

    Quote Originally Posted by emama View Post
    Yes! Whatever you do, DON'T use the pump to tell you how much milk is there. Some women can BF for hours but can only pump 1 oz or so. I can't pump a lot and I've been BFing for months.

    The real test is making sure the LO isn't dehydrated (sunken fontenel, e.g.), good diaper output (what is it? 6-8 wet diapers a day?) and weight gain. It always seems nebulous at first but it's the only way to tell.
    yes, thanks. Her LO was NOT gaining,(actually losing) not having wet or poopie diapers, and a before and after weigh that said he was getting nothing. so it is not jsut the pump saying her milk hasn't come in, it really hasn't come in.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: What if your milk doesn't come in?

    I'm glad to hear she is seeing an IBCLC.

    Sometimes, the milk is slow to "come-in" after a c-section. Other issues could be: excess bleeding after the birth, placental fragment left behind, thyroid issues, PCOS, underdeveloped breast tissue (hypoplastic breasts), previous breast surgery, ect.

    Here is some more detailed information:
    http://www.breastfeed-essentials.com/hindrances.html

    Even if your friend is unable to bring in a full milk supply, she would still be able to nurse. Some mothers find that using a prescription galactagogue (milk increaser) and supplementing feedings at the breast helps them to produce more milk AND enjoy nurturing their babies at the breast.

    Keep us updated!

  8. #8
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    Default Re: What if your milk doesn't come in?

    Quote Originally Posted by home executive View Post
    I'm glad to hear she is seeing an IBCLC.

    Sometimes, the milk is slow to "come-in" after a c-section. Other issues could be: excess bleeding after the birth, placental fragment left behind, thyroid issues, PCOS, underdeveloped breast tissue (hypoplastic breasts), previous breast surgery, ect.

    Here is some more detailed information:
    http://www.breastfeed-essentials.com/hindrances.html

    Even if your friend is unable to bring in a full milk supply, she would still be able to nurse. Some mothers find that using a prescription galactagogue (milk increaser) and supplementing feedings at the breast helps them to produce more milk AND enjoy nurturing their babies at the breast.

    Keep us updated!

    thanks for the link, i will pass it on! As far as a galactagogue, I had mentioned this but wasn't sure if that would help increase what may not be there. I know it increases milk supply, but does it help it initiate? Do you think her milk HAS come in just in small doses or it is still colostrum? She says it looks like milk . . . Anyway, thanks for the replies!

  9. #9
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    Default Re: What if your milk doesn't come in?

    how often is she pumping...
    Kelly moms has a great page on how to pump if the baby isn't nursing at all
    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/ma...pply-pump.html


    from that link
    How often should mom pump?

    8-10 times per day: Until supply is well established, it is important to get at least eight good nursing and/or pumping sessions per 24 hours. Ten sessions per day is better, particularly if you have twins or higher order multiples.
    These sessions don't need to be evenly spaced, but you should be nursing/pumping at least once during the night in the first few months or anytime you notice a decrease in supply. Avoid going longer than 5-6 hours without pumping during the first few months.
    When pumping during the night, milk yield tends to be better if you pump when you naturally wake (to go to the bathroom or because your breasts are uncomfortably full) than if you set an alarm to wake for pumping.
    If you are having a hard time getting in enough pumping sessions, adding even a short pumping session (increasing frequency even if milk is not removed thoroughly) is helpful.
    If baby does not nurse at all:
    The first few days, before mom's milk comes in, hand expression is often the most effective way to express colostrum. Double pump for 10-15 minutes per session for additional stimulation.
    Once mom's milk is in, pump for 30 minutes per session, or for 2-5 minutes after the last drops of milk.
    If baby nurses but does not soften the breast well
    Double pump for 10-15 minutes after nursing.
    Empty the breast as thoroughly as possible at each session. To ensure that the pump removes an optimum amount of milk from the breast, keep pumping for 2-5 minutes after the last drops of milk. Use breast massage prior to pumping, and massage and compressions during pumping to better empty the breasts and increase pumping output.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: What if your milk doesn't come in?

    Another thing that can affect milk production postpartum is whether or not certain drugs were used during labor or prior to delivery. I've heard that magnesium sulfate can really affect milk supply......

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