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Thread: When does Milk Usually Come In?

  1. #1
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    Nov 2007
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    Default When does Milk Usually Come In?

    My son is 3 days old now, and I haven't had my milk come in yet? I've starting pumping to stimulate my breast approximately every 3 hours. The baby did well in the hospital with breastfeading only; however I've since I've been home I've suplamented with formula, because I didn't think he was getting enough to eat. I haven't felt an "engorement" and the pump doesn't get anything out not even colustrum. This is my second attempt at breastfeeding, I was unsuccesful the first time, and really want to breastfeed my son. I'm not very stressed about it but would like it to work, shouldn't I have milk by now?

  2. #2
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    Nov 2007
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    Default Re: When does Milk Usually Come In?

    Yes, my mom gives him the bottle sometimes, before I can get to him, but yes I am putting him on the breast whenever he awakes or if he doesn't wake up, its every 3 hours or so. He's been really sleepy since he's been born.

    Edilsa

  3. #3
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    Oct 2007
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    Default Re: When does Milk Usually Come In?

    with my first two boys my milk came in about 3 days after i had them and it came full force but with my daughter it came in about 4 days later and then about 2 or 3 days after that it hit me and i have enough bm for 2 or 3 babies keep up the good work and congrads

  4. #4
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    Default Re: When does Milk Usually Come In?

    Quote Originally Posted by elegrier View Post
    Yes, my mom gives him the bottle sometimes, before I can get to him, but yes I am putting him on the breast whenever he awakes or if he doesn't wake up, its every 3 hours or so. He's been really sleepy since he's been born.

    Edilsa
    have you explained to your mom that bfding is supply and demand, the more baby nurses, the more you will make. my milk took 5 days to come in. the pediatrician told me that i needed to feed ds every 1 1/2 hours. i had to wake him to get him to eat, to not let him sleep through a feeding, except at night then he could go for 4 hours. pumping is good, but you also need to get the baby to the breast. the pump cannot do what the baby can. good luck!

  5. #5
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    Default Re: When does Milk Usually Come In?



    Quote Originally Posted by elegrier View Post
    My son is 3 days old now, and I haven't had my milk come in yet?
    How often is your baby nursing? What color are his diapers? About how many times in the last 24 hours has he peed and pooped?

    Could you tell us a little bit about your birth experience?

    Here is some information about colostrum that you might find helpful and reassuring:
    http://www.lalecheleague.org/FAQ/colostrum.html

    Quote Originally Posted by elegrier View Post
    I've starting pumping to stimulate my breast approximately every 3 hours. The baby did well in the hospital with breastfeading only; however I've since I've been home I've suplamented with formula, because I didn't think he was getting enough to eat.
    Could you tell us what made you feel he wasn't getting enough?

    Quote Originally Posted by elegrier View Post
    I haven't felt an "engorement"
    Engorgement isn't necessary for your milk to "come in". Some mothers experience varying degrees of engorgement, some don't become engorged at all! The best way to tell that your milk has "come in" is by your baby's diapers. The color of the bowel movements will change to more of a lighter brown/yellow, the consistancy will be looser, and they will become more frequent, as well.

    Here's some helpful information on engorgement:
    http://www.lalecheleague.org/FAQ/engorgement.html

    Here's some changes you might expect to see in your baby's bowel movements:
    http://www.lactnews.com/englishdd.html

    Quote Originally Posted by elegrier View Post
    and the pump doesn't get anything out not even colustrum.
    Most mothers find that they cannot remove colostrum with a pump. Colostrum is thick and sticky, measured in small amounts (teaspoons vs ounces), and there's not a lot of force bringing it down. The best way to remove colostrum (aside from breastfeeding) is hand expression.

    Here's one method that many mothers find helpful (video):
    http://newborns.stanford.edu/Breastf...xpression.html (non-LLL resource)

    Quote Originally Posted by elegrier View Post
    This is my second attempt at breastfeeding, I was unsuccesful the first time, and really want to breastfeed my son. I'm not very stressed about it but would like it to work, shouldn't I have milk by now?
    Not necessarily. Sometimes it can take a little longer for the milk to "come in".

    Have you called to your local LLL Leader or International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC)?

    Could you tell us a bit more about your experience with your first time breastfeeding?

    Quote Originally Posted by elegrier View Post
    Yes, my mom gives him the bottle sometimes, before I can get to him,
    About how many total ounces of formula is your baby taking? And how frequently are you nursing?

    Quote Originally Posted by elegrier View Post
    but yes I am putting him on the breast whenever he awakes or if he doesn't wake up, its every 3 hours or so. He's been really sleepy since he's been born.
    Great! It's important to nurse as often as possible. If he doesn't wake up, you could try to wake him no longer than every two hours (counting from the start last feeding).

    You might find that skin to skin contact helps your baby stay awake and nurse better. My best suggestion is to keep him close as much as you can, and nurse as frequently as you can.

    If your baby starts to drift off to sleep soon after he starts nursing, you could try breast compressions to keep him awake. This page tells how the technique works, and how to perform it:
    http://www.kellymom.com/newman/15bre...mpression.html (non-LLL resource)
    And this page contains videos that show you how to use the technique:
    http://www.thebirthden.com/Newman.html (non-LLL resource)

    Another thing you could try is after feedings, hand express colostrum onto a spoon. Then, supplement with your colostrum (right off the spoon!). The video on hand expression shows you how.


    Keep us updated! And please do answer the above questions as it will help us to help YOU! Additionally, (if you haven't already) do call someone locally so that they can SEE you and help you in person. We are limited by what we can do online, but someone who can help you in person and can see what is going on will be able to further assist you.

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