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Thread: Microwaving milk to get rid of lipase?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    3

    Question Microwaving milk to get rid of lipase?

    I need to scald my freshly pumped breast milk to remove the lipase (since my milk seems to spoil very quickly) but I don't have access to a stove at work, only a microwave. I know microwaves are no-nos for warming up milk but can they be used to scald milk for purposes of removing lipase?

    If not, will it help to scald the milk an hour or two after it's pumped, when I get home from work?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Default Re: Microwaving milk to get rid of lipase?

    No, a microwave cannot be used for this purpose. In fact, breastmilk should never be microwaved.

    You should scald the milk as soon after expression as possible. Just after expression is best, but if that's not an option, do so as soon as you can.

    Here's a helpful article:
    http://www.lalecheleague.org/NB/NBJulAug98p109.html

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    100

    Default Re: Microwaving milk to get rid of lipase?

    Aamann & Jolie ~ I have the same issue and have had success with microwaving. As I understand it, the two concerns with microwaving are 1) that it negates some of the nutritional benefits of breastmilk and 2) that you might burn baby with hot spots. Scalding does the same "damage" to milk that microwaving does, so issue #1 is something you just have to live with. I believe the immunological benefits are still retained. As for point #2, I think if you are freezing the milk directly, than you avoid the problems of potential burns.

  4. #4
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    Jan 2006
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    Default Re: Microwaving milk to get rid of lipase?

    I just posted some references on microwaving human breast milk in the other thread regarding scalding milk due to excessive lipase. Those might be helpful in deciding whether microwaving human breast milk for any reason is a good idea Just thought I'd tell you that I posted references in another thread (I have not read the articles though).

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Default Re: Microwaving milk to get rid of lipase?

    Good conversation on this topic here:
    http://www.lalecheleague.org/vbullet...read.php?t=297

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    32

    Wink Re: Microwaving milk to get rid of lipase?

    DO NOT MICROWAVE ANYTHING!!!! INFANT DANGER:
    http://www.mercola.com/article/microwave/hazards2.htm

    In the journal Pediatrics (vol. 89, no. 4, April 1992), there appeared an article titled, "Effects of Microwave Radiation on Anti-infective Factors in Human Milk". Richard Quan, M.D. from Dallas, Texas, was the lead name of the study team. John A. Kerner, M.D., from Stanford University, was also on the research team, and he was quoted in a summary article on the research that appeared in the 25 April 1992 issue of Science News.

    To get the full flavour of what may lie ahead for microwaving, here is that summary article: "Women who work outside the home can express and store breast milk for feedings when they are away. But parents and caregivers should be careful how they warm this milk. A new study shows that microwaving human milk-even at a low setting-can destroy some of its important disease-fighting capabilities.

    "Breast milk can be refrigerated safely for a few days or frozen for up to a month; however, studies have shown that heating the milk well above body temperature-37&degree;C-can break down not only its antibodies to infectious agents, but also its lysozymes or bacteria-digesting enzymes.

    So, when paediatrician John A. Kerner, Jr, witnessed neonatal nurses routinely thawing or reheating breast milk with the microwave oven in their lounge, he became concerned. "In the April 1992 issue of Pediatrics (Part I), he and his Stanford University co-workers reported finding that unheated breast milk that was microwaved lost lysozyme activity, antibodies and fostered the growth of more potentially pathogenic bacteria.

    Milk heated at a high setting (72 degree;C to 98 degree;C) lost 96 per cent of its immunoglobulin-A antibodies, agents that fend off invading microbes. "What really surprised him, Kerner said, was finding some loss of anti-infective properties in the milk microwaved at a low setting-and to a mean of just 33.5degree;C.

    Adverse changes at such low temperatures suggest 'microwaving itself may in fact cause some injury to the milk above and beyond the heating'. "But Randall M. Goldblum of the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston disagrees, saying: 'I don't see any compelling evidence that the microwaves did any harm.

    It was the heating.' Lysozyme and antibody degradation in the coolest samples may simply reflect the development of small hot spots-potentially 60&degree;C or above-during microwaving, noted Madeleine Sigman-Grant of Pennsylvania State University, University Park. And that's to be expected, she said, because microwave heating is inherently uneven-and quite unpredictable when volumes less than four millilitres are involved, as was the case in the Kerner's study.

    "Goldblum considers use of a microwave to thaw milk an especially bad idea, since it is likely to boil some of the milk before all has even liquefied. Stanford University Medical Center no longer microwaves breast milk, Kerner notes. And that's appropriate, Sigman-Grant believes, because of the small volumes of milk that hospitals typically serve newborns-especially premature infants."

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