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Thread: Newbie Advice

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    3

    Default Newbie Advice

    Yes, I am a man, but my wife is still recovering from her c-section, and today is my daughter's first day at home, so I'm doing all the research I can on BF.

    1) My wife's milk hasn't come in yet (baby's only 2 days old), and last night my daughter was acting really fussy and hungry all night. She fed almost every hour between 5 and 11, with the last feeding lasting an hour. After she was done, she was still fussy, so we asked the nursery what to do and they suggested supplementing with some sugar water, which i administered to her. (only a half-ounce) and she fell right to sleep. She's been ok ever since, but seems reluctant at times to wake up and feed. I know that colostrum is supposed to hold her over until the milk comes in, but my daughter is 8 lb 12 oz (at birth) and seems to be unsatisfied. What do we do until her milk comes in?

    2) If my daughter doesn't want to wake up and feed, do we let her sleep, or wake her up, and what are some good techniques to do this?

    3) My daughter hasn't had a poopy diaper since 4 am Thursday morning (born 9:39 Wednesday). I'm thinking she might not be getting enough to eat, and the pediatrician says she's a bit jaundiced. What do we do to tide her over 'till milk gets here?

    Sorry if the questions are redundant. Remember, I'm only a man...heh.

    MD

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    241

    Default Re: Newbie Advice

    Ahhhh, no sugar water, pacifiers, formula ect. All these can disrupt breastfeeding. It's a law of supply and demand. Your wife's body will adjust to your baby's appetite.The first few days all baby needs is colostrum, if her belly is full of sugar water (where's the nutritional value in that?) than she won't be hungery to nurse and if baby isn't emptying the breast by nursing than this signals the breast to make less milk - the exact opposite of what you want! Frequent nursings in the beginning help the real milk to come in quicker. Let baby nurse as long and as frequent as she wants to, this is how mother and baby become in sync with the whole breastfeeding thing.
    Remember a newborns' stomach is the size of a walnut, very tiny, but because tiny empties quickly. Breastmilk is digested quickly.
    I would say a newborn baby shouldn't go longer than two hours without feeding, and yes that means wake her up to nurse. To wake baby up undress down to diaper, have Mom hold baby against her skin. A quick wash with a wash clothe helps too.
    The hospital should have given you a chart to count poops/pees, this will tell you if baby is getting enough.
    Doctor will keep an eye on the jaundice, might have you come in daily for bloodtest, don't let that stop your wife from breastfeeding.
    Finally, get in contact with a lactation consultant , your hospital should be able to recommend one. She will be a fountain of knowledge for you guys. I would also recommend you get a book about breastfeeding, very helpful to refer to at 2 in the morning.
    Good luck! Don't get discouraged, it gets easier, you are doing the best and healthiest thing for your baby!!!
    Last edited by Lansdowne; October 19th, 2007 at 04:56 PM. Reason: spelling error

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    68

    Default Re: Newbie Advice

    Hello Newbie!

    those first few days can be completely crazy! i remember. my daughter seemed to stay attached to my boob non stop. the longer she nurses now, the quicker your wife's milk will come in.
    a good rule of thumb is that your newborn will nurse every 2-3 hours for the first few weeks...but it isnt always every 2-3 hours. sometimes it is more like every 45min - 1 hour.

    here is my sample schedule from the first few weeks.
    6am - start on left side. nursed on that side for approx 35 min.
    switched to right side. nursed for 20 minutes.
    baby sleeps. wakes up at 8:15. start nursing on right side for 25 minutes. switched to left side. nursed for 15 minutes....
    really. it is 2-3 hours from the start of one nursing session to the start of the second session.

    the lactation consultant i worked with at the hospital said that more they nurse in those early days the sooner the milk comes in. my philosophy was to let the baby nurse as long and as often as she wants to. the milk will be here soon. and when it gets here i promise your wife will know it.

    get the chart from the hospital. dont offer surgar water at all. i did use a pacifier and still do...especially after i have nursed for an hour...but be sure to watch for early hunger signs.

    hopefully some others will post links to videos of early hunger cues. or maybe you can google it and see what i am talking about. basically crying is a sign of late hunger.

    keep it up. it is hard work but is so rewarding. it is awesome to just look down at your little one and see how you are helping them to grow physically and emotionally.

    you are in for the ride of your life. try to enjoy it as much as possible. and nap when the baby is napping...it will save your life!


  4. #4

    Default Re: Newbie Advice

    Hi there
    It's pretty normal for a 2 day old baby to act frantically hungry. In fact, it's the constant nursing that helps draw the milk in! I'd suggest that you avoid supplementation. I know your wife is tired, but her milk should come in very soon and baby should settle down a bit after that.

    Here's an EXCELLENT article that actually answers A LOT of your questions :
    http://www.llli.org/FAQ/enough.html

    Jen
    "Mothers are designed to be available to their babies--to help them make the transition into this big, wide world. To teach them to trust, and love, and feel good about being alive."
    --Elizabeth N. Baldwin, Esq., So I Nursed Him Every 45 Minutes

    Click here to find your local LLL Group
    How to tell if your breastfed baby is getting enough milk!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    3,900

    Default Re: Newbie Advice

    Quote Originally Posted by madisdaddy View Post
    Yes, I am a man, but my wife is still recovering from her c-section, and today is my daughter's first day at home, so I'm doing all the research I can on BF.


    Quote Originally Posted by madisdaddy View Post
    1) My wife's milk hasn't come in yet (baby's only 2 days old), and last night my daughter was acting really fussy and hungry all night. She fed almost every hour between 5 and 11, with the last feeding lasting an hour. After she was done, she was still fussy, so we asked the nursery what to do and they suggested supplementing with some sugar water, which i administered to her. (only a half-ounce) and she fell right to sleep. She's been ok ever since, but seems reluctant at times to wake up and feed. I know that colostrum is supposed to hold her over until the milk comes in, but my daughter is 8 lb 12 oz (at birth) and seems to be unsatisfied. What do we do until her milk comes in?
    I would like to reassure that colostrum is enough for a baby of 8 lb 12 oz (or even larger or much smaller). It is actually a myth that bigger babies need more than what colostrum can provide. Here is some information about colostrum, why it is all a newborn needs (barring medical emergencies, of course), and info about the stomach capacity of a newborn:
    http://www.llli.org/FAQ/colostrum.html

    It's very normal for babies to nurse frequently, especially at first. Here's some information about frequency of nursing:
    http://www.llli.org/FAQ/frequency.html

    Your wife could try nursing baby until she comes off on her own or falls asleep, then hand expressing colostrum onto a spoon (colostrum is thick and somewhat sticky so it stays on). Then, your baby can be immediately supplemented with the colostrum right from the spoon! This video shows both how to hand express and how to supplement via spoon:
    http://newborns.stanford.edu/Breastf...xpression.html

    Are your wife's nipples sore?

    Quote Originally Posted by madisdaddy View Post
    2) If my daughter doesn't want to wake up and feed, do we let her sleep, or wake her up, and what are some good techniques to do this?
    You mentioned your baby is beginning to become jaundiced. Jaundice can contribute to sleepiness and sleepiness can contribute to jaundice since baby doesn't eat as frequently.

    In this situation, it's important to wake baby to feed. Once baby is awake your wife can keep her actively sucking at the breast by using breast compressions. Here's how the technique works:
    http://www.kellymom.com/newman/15bre...mpression.html (non-LLL resource)
    Please see the video link inside the article for examples of the technique in action.

    Here are some tips for waking a sleepy baby:
    * Strip baby down to a diaper, and mom will be topless. Mom will hold baby upright on her chest. A blanket can be wrapped around mom's shoulders to keep them both warm. Skin to skin contact is relaxing for baby, but it also "wakes up" the reflexes. Don't be surprised if baby starts to "peck" her way down to the breast!
    * Try turning the lights down. Newborn eyes are sensitive to light, and baby will shut her eyes to shield them from bright light.
    * Talk to her, try to make eye contact
    * Change diaper and burp--most newborns don't like a diaper change and it will wake them up
    * If baby consitantly falls asleep in the cradle hold, try the football hold (a little less "cozy")
    * Try supporting the weight of the breast while nursing so it isn't resting on baby's chin (makes for a tired baby)
    * Breast compressions!
    * Increase stimulation--gently rub her back, lightly rub the crown of her head in a circular motion, rub her hands or feet, "walk" your fingers up her spine, circle her lips with your fingertip. Remember to keep talking and trying to make eye contact!

    Quote Originally Posted by madisdaddy View Post
    3) My daughter hasn't had a poopy diaper since 4 am Thursday morning (born 9:39 Wednesday). I'm thinking she might not be getting enough to eat, and the pediatrician says she's a bit jaundiced. What do we do to tide her over 'till milk gets here?
    Has she made a poopy yet? We like to see two stools (anything larger than a U.S. quarter counts) on day two.

    Is she making wet diapers? If you seem unsure, you could put a couple of sheets of toilet paper inside her diaper. You'll be more likely to see the urine that way.

    Here's some info that tells you what to look for:
    http://www.lalecheleague.org/FAQ/enough.html

    Remember: Colostrum/breastmilk pushes stool. Jaundice is eliminated from the body via stool. The more baby stools, the better. Feeding frequently, assuring baby is latched on well, swallowing, and even supplementing after feeds with colostrum are all ways to assure that baby is getting enough milk and is pooping enough.

    Please keep us updated!

    Quote Originally Posted by madisdaddy View Post
    Sorry if the questions are redundant. Remember, I'm only a man...heh.
    Not redundant at all! It might help to know that we love when daddies ask questions! It's so encouraging for mothers when their partner to be helpful and supportive, especially during those early days of breastfeeding and recovering. You're doing a great thing!

    Has your wife seen an IBCLC? Has she called her local LLL Leader?
    Last edited by LLL_Jolie; October 20th, 2007 at 12:54 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,420

    Default Re: Newbie Advice

    Remember, I'm only a man...heh.
    Don't be silly!

    This link might give you a smile tonight.
    http://www.unassistedchildbirth.com/...s/milkmen.html



    I have nothing to add to the advice above. I did want to add that your wife is one lucky lady to have a supportive guy like you!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Newbie Advice

    Well, my wife's milk came in last night, so baby's feeding lots more, but still no stool. She is peeing, so I'm not worried there, and one time I saw a few flecks of some yellowish sticky stuff.

    Since the milk is now in, I know she's getting plenty to eat. She's not acting fussy unless she's hungry (or I'm changing her).

    Is it unheard of for her not to poop for as long as she hasn't? (coming up on 60 hours now, and she's 3 days old).

    Thanks

    MD

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    88

    Default Re: Newbie Advice

    Quote Originally Posted by madisdaddy View Post
    Well, my wife's milk came in last night, so baby's feeding lots more, but still no stool. She is peeing, so I'm not worried there, and one time I saw a few flecks of some yellowish sticky stuff.

    Since the milk is now in, I know she's getting plenty to eat. She's not acting fussy unless she's hungry (or I'm changing her).

    Is it unheard of for her not to poop for as long as she hasn't? (coming up on 60 hours now, and she's 3 days old).

    Thanks

    MD
    Hey!
    Congratulations!
    It's unusual, but i don't think it' s unheard of. I'd take her to the ped. to be sure. The yellowish sticky stuff sounds like poop to me! Pretty soon, i promise, you'll be waiting for the day when the poop slows down! (i remember settling Ella down, laying down myself and hearing that unmistakable sound! )
    Keep up the good work!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    228

    Default Re: Newbie Advice

    Lots of good advice here and it sounds like things are going great. Just a little reminder for the days ahead:

    - A fussy baby is not (necessarily) a hungry baby!
    - Bottles (of expressed breast milk or formula) won't (necessarily) cure a fussy baby!

    Fussing is normal, not necessarily a hunger sign. Mine get really fussy from 3 weeks to about 3 months.

    Just nurse, nurse, nurse!

    Good luck,

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    580

    Default Re: Newbie Advice

    Congatultaions and welcome! Sounds like you guys are doing great. You might want to check with the ped. about the dirty diaper. It tok me a while to be ok with going to the dr for ALL of my questions (I felt so inadequate and silly). Don't be like me. They expect new parents to call or go in often!
    I must add that there are probably a whole bunch of women saying, "Aww, isn't he the greatest!". I hope your wife has a speedy recovery!

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