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Thread: High needs and Breastfeeding

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    75

    Default High needs and Breastfeeding

    Was at the ped today, Dr said DS (4 months) was high needs...how is tha possible? I feel this was based on his feeding 11-15 times/day. DS has reflux, I was told frequent small meals were the way to go. DS sleeps decent at night, only waking every 3 or 4 hours to eat.

    Is this just a quick label or is there more to it? I thought "high needs" was more than just a frequent feeder. How many times "should" a "normal" BF baby of this age eat?

    BTW, DS did pitch a fit at the drs, a real wobbler, he has one of these every few days depending on how he's feeling, naps, feeds, etc. I'm a first time mom, thought an occasional wobbler was just "normal".

    What are your thoughts?
    as long as we can, as often as we can

    Mama to DS born June 2007

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    1,987

    Default Re: High needs and Breastfeeding

    I think you would probably know if you had a high needs baby. (And honestly, aren't all babies high needs to some extent?) DS nursed that much at that age (about 10-12 times/24 hours until after a year), but wasn't any higher needs than any other baby.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    329

    Default Re: High needs and Breastfeeding

    I never knew "high needs" to relate to a feeding schedule. I was told and came to expect DD would feed 8-12 X per day for the first few months.

    I equated high needs to be how much a beby needed outside feeding--ex. I could NEVER leave my baby in a bouncer, swing etc for more than 30 seconds before she would start screaming. Whereas other moms could watch their babes coo away in a bouncy seat for an hour at a time. And DD had colic for 5 months. I figured--that's high needs. Feeding--well that's the easy part!

  4. #4
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    Jun 2006
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    Default Re: High needs and Breastfeeding

    I have no real clue what the actual definition of high-needs is but if that constitues high needs, then most newborns are and my 16 mo old son definitely is... Is high-needs emotianl of physical? I mean My DS2 wasn't put down for months and was never layed flat when he was sleeping - we had to fiddle with all our our sleeping arrangements over and over and so many other things...

    So - Did you ask the doc about it or did he offer up the opinion unsolicited? I just wonder because if you asked him, he may have just thrown that out there to give you something... kwim?
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Default Re: High needs and Breastfeeding

    dr sears has some great info on his web site..
    You might want to check out his books.

    http://www.askdrsears.com/html/5/T051200.asp


    https://www.askdrsears.com/store/detail.asp?pid=18

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    178

    Default Re: High needs and Breastfeeding

    Hi
    I don't think the feeding frequency alone would be enough to call your ds the "high-needs" outlined at the Dr. Sears link in the pp-seems within the normal range IMO. The profile describes quite a bit more and as other posters say I that all babies have some degree of "high-needs" in one or several areas. My dd does actually have all the profile characteristics Dr. Sears discusses, but I've gotten so used to going with her flow, I don't really even think about the "high-needs" term. She just knows what she wants, when she wants it and won't settle for less-I absolutely my ball of non-stop energy!!! If your ds turns out to be "high-needs" in more of the Dr. Sears sense, defintely recommend his book.

    DD1-Nursed 12/06-9/08
    DD2-Nursed 12/08 - 10/10

    DS - Successful VBA2C May 5/11 and

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    509

    Default Re: High needs and Breastfeeding

    Here's what Dr. Sears' site has to say. It doesn't have to do with eating all the time, lots of bf babies eat all the time!

    Hayden didn't fit any of the usual labels. She really wasn't a "fussy" baby, as long as we held her and attended to her needs. "Spirited" was misleading; everyone wants a spirited baby. She wasn't "colicky," since she didn't seem to be in pain. Nor did the tag "difficult" ring true; some may beg to differ, but we were finding that holding and being near a baby to whom we were becoming so attached was not all that difficult. Besides, these labels were too negative for this little person who seemed to know so positively what she needed and how to get it. It wasn't until years later, after talking with dozens of parents of babies who also needed to nurse so often, needed to be held a lot, needed human contact at night, that the term "high need child" came to us. It best describes the kind of baby Hayden was and the level of parenting she needed.

    In my pediatric practice, I discovered that the term "high need child" was P.C. -- psychologically correct. By the time drained parents came to me for counseling about their demanding baby, they had already been on the receiving end of a barrage of negatives: "You hold her too much," "It must be your milk," "She's controlling you." All relayed an underlying message of "bad baby and bad parenting." They felt it was somehow their fault their baby acted this way. As soon as I would pronounce the diagnosis "high need child," I could see a look of relief on the faces of the parents. Finally, someone had something nice to say about their baby. "High need" sounds special, intelligent, unique, and it shifts the focus to the baby's personality, relieving parents from the guilt of believing that their baby acts this way because of their parenting. Further, "high need" suggests that there is something parents can do to help this baby. It underscores the idea that these babies simply need more: more touch, more understanding, more sensitivity, more attachment parenting.
    I'm proud to be first woman in my family to breastfeed!
    cloth diapering convert!
    Loving the homemade baby food!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    75

    Default Re: High needs and Breastfeeding

    Thanks all for the feedback

    I'm a big Dr. Sears fan, thought I was missing something but looks like I'm on the right track.

    Thanks again!!!
    as long as we can, as often as we can

    Mama to DS born June 2007

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