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Thread: Just wanting to play?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    18

    Default Just wanting to play?

    Lily uses the ASL sign for milk and says "eese" (eat? nurse?) when she wants to nurse. Sometimes she'll try to lift up my shirt. Unless I am in the middle of doing something in public (like checking out at the grocery store), I will offer her a breast. Sometimes she'll take right to it (usually if it's before bed or nap or if it's been awhile), but other times, she'll just look at the brest, and pat it or hug it or nurse for 10 seconds and then pop off. Sometimes if I just sit there with my breast exposed, she'll eventually latch herself on and nurse for a full session. Other times, she'll pull down my shirt (to cover up the breasts) and say all done.

    Is this "normal"? Is she just checking in? Sometimes if she's screwing around and just playing, I'll close up shop and end the session. Is that okay? Is she getting a conflicting message? I want her to feel like she can nurse whenever she'd like, but I don't want to sit around topless for an hour every time she asks to nurse, ya know?

    Suggestions? Encouragement?

    Thanks!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    307

    Default Re: Just wanting to play?

    What your daughter is doing, as far as patting or playing with the breast is quite common and perfectly normal.

    As our babies get older and go into toddlerhood, it is absolutely acceptable and expected to want to set new limits on nursing. Making it work for mother AND baby is very important for extended breastfeeding and many mothers find themselves re-evaluating their expectations of themselves and their babies as far as nursing goes. It's okay to tell her that if she is not going to nurse, you're snapping the bra and moving on to the next activity.

    To this point, usually the biggest source of time with mom has been nursing. To replace some of that with playtime away from the breast can reduce playtime at the breast. Reading a book, singing songs together, playing with toys or puzzles are ways that many mothers distract from the breast when the toddlers seem to want to just play.

    HTH

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