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Thread: No BM Blood Specialist!!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    110

    Angry No BM Blood Specialist!!

    I made a previous post about how my daughter was at the hospital for 2 days 104 degree fever, lethargic....

    Well they said that she has extremely low anemia count. She explained to her father and residents when they were diagnoising? and discharging her that this is what happens when a baby is only breast fed!

    Now after all my hours of falling asleep at my pump at 3am if I were there you can believe the words that would have come out of my mouth require a gallon of soap.

    So the blood specialist suggested that we give the baby a half diet of formula and a half diet of breast milk, iron drops and increase in "adult food". DD is now 12 and a half months.

    She had her blood test yesterday and the doctor said that she looked good and that she would call my DD's doctor and tell her when it is fine for the baby to have cows milk and only 3 times a day! Then said that it was the breast milk that was causing the anemia and that at night she should only get water or juice. Too much milk is the PROBLEM.

    Now unfortunately I could not be at the appointment to ask my many questions because I have a job and her father does not. So now I am completely upset and lost.

    Why is it everytime I speak to a medical specialist, breastmilk is not the answer??????
    If she didnt reach for me at birth I still wouldn't believe that she's all mine.

    Terrible 2s dont exist... Who am I kidding?!?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    18,063

    Default Re: No BM Blood Specialist!!

    my dd had that problem too....
    Thats exactly what they specilaist told me too... wean baby and get that baby on foods, and that breastmilk has no benifits after 6 months anyways.
    I was livid and as we were walking out of the doctors office my hubby said
    "WELL.. did you hear anything after breastmilks not good for baby after 6 months...." It was bad if my hubby was able to see it....
    I had to figure it out on my own.
    I asked on of the gals that comes to my lLL group what they were doing for thier dd who was about the same age as mine
    Her hubby was a natural ciropractic doctor and he recomends flora dix.
    its a natural iron thats made out of plants that your body can absorb beter then the other irons....
    heres a web site about it...
    I didn't wean my dd and now shes just fine!
    http://www.florahealth.com/flora/hom...cts/r64771.asp

    was your baby born early? Some babies that are born early have a lower iron store then full term babies.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    18,063

    Default Re: No BM Blood Specialist!!

    they told me too that too much milk was the problem....
    ITs true that too much cows milk is a problem
    but the iron thats in breastmilk is absorbed beter then the iron that's in formula!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    295

    Default Re: No BM Blood Specialist!!

    I am going to play the devil's advocate here for just a sec (just a tiny one!). While they were TOTALLY wrong to blame breastmilk or say that breastmilk itself caused the problem, it is plausible that a 12.5 month old might need other sources of iron, whether through diet or supplementation. Formula is NOT better than breastmilk, of course, but it is true that it contains much more iron, so to that extent the doctors probably do see more BF babies with iron deficiency than FF ones. That's no excuse to confuse correlation with cause-and-effect, though.

    Is it possible that your DD's father misunderstood the doctor - that they were not blaming the breastmilk ITSELF, but suggesting night weaning so that your DD would be more interested in iron-rich foods? Even that is questionable but at least it would make more sense...

    Anyway, I'm so sorry you're dealing with these hard-headed medical types, but I'm glad your DD's blood work is good now!
    Erin - Hayden James is my beautiful boy - we've been nursing happily for two years, with no end in sight!


    Change the language, change the reality.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    1,330

    Default Re: No BM Blood Specialist!!

    Pediatrician told me at dd's 6 month well check to feed cereal 2x's per day for the iron. If she doesn't eat 2 servings of cereal with iron then give a vitamin supplement with iron. This in order to prevent the iron deficiency. Formula is fortified with iron, I believe, and higher in iron for baby than BM. BM is best, but they do need their iron after 6 months since that's about when the store they are born with is used up.

    Amy

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    18,063

    Default Re: No BM Blood Specialist!!

    http://www.askdrsears.com/html/4/t043100.asp


    heres a link to dr sears
    "Borderline" anemia can usually be corrected just by increasing your dietary supply of iron, without taking iron supplements. If your child is anemic, here's how to restock the iron deficient body stores and elevate the hemoglobin level to normal:

    Step 1: Using diet to correct anemia in infants requires about one milligram of dietary iron per pound per day. So a twenty-pound infant would need a minimum of 20 milligrams of iron per day, or about twice the usual RDA. Depending on your infant's willingness to eat a lot of iron-rich foods, it can be difficult to correct anemia with dietary measures alone. The good news is that the intestines compensate for iron deficiency by increasing the percentage of iron absorbed from foods, and you can improve iron absorption by combining good iron sources with vitamin C sources. It usually requires even more dietary iron than the above amount to correct anemia, but if your infant is only slightly anemic, it is worth trying the dietary increase for a couple of weeks, and then having your doctor recheck baby's hemoglobin.

    Step 2: If dietary iron does not produce a significant improvement in your infant's hemoglobin and/or serum ferritin, it would be wise to begin giving your child iron supplements in the form of drops or pills in the dosage and timing recommended by your doctor. The usual oral dose is two milligrams per pound given three times a day between meals to enhance absorption. The iron syrup that is usually recommended for children is ferrous sulfate or ferrous succinate. During the first three weeks of treatment the hemoglobin increases at a rate of 0.15 to 0.25 grams per day, so if your infant has a hemoglobin of nine and it should be eleven, expect it to take around three weeks to reach this level. In order to replenish the depleted iron stores, it's best to continue oral iron supplements for at least two months after the hemoglobin becomes normal.

    Step 3: If your baby's hemoglobin is not increasing by at least one gram after two to four weeks of treatment, your doctor may either want to increase the dosage of iron supplement or do some further blood tests to determine if the anemia has other causes besides iron deficiency










    and then this

    You can prevent iron-deficiency anemia by making wise food choices for yourself and your family. Getting your daily iron from food is preferable to taking iron supplements, which sometimes cause abdominal discomfort and constipation. Here are some ways to assure there is enough iron in your family's diet.

    Breastfeed your baby as long as possible. Once upon a time it was believed that breastfed babies needed iron supplements because human milk was low in iron. Yet, breastfed babies studied at four to six months of age had a higher hemoglobin than infants who were fed iron-fortified formula. Breastfed babies have been found to have sufficient iron stores for nine months or longer. Human milk remains an important part of baby's diet, even after the introduction of solids.

    Use an iron-fortified formula. If bottlefeeding, use an iron-fortified formula, preferably beginning at birth, but at least starting by three months of age. Continue iron-fortified formula for at least one year or as long as your baby's doctor recommends, which is usually until your infant is eating adequate amounts of other dietary sources of iron. Do not use "low-iron" formulas, which do not contain sufficient iron for a growing baby's needs.

    Delay cow's milk feeding for infants; limit it for toddlers. The Committee on Nutrition of the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that parents delay using cow's milk as a beverage until a baby is at least one year of age. There are two iron-related reasons for this: cow's milk is low in iron, and cow's milk can irritate the intestinal lining, causing bleeding and the loss of iron. This is a tiny amount of blood loss, but over a long period of time it can be significant. The combination of poor iron intake and increased iron loss sets a baby up for iron deficiency anemia, and excessive milk consumption is a common cause of iron deficiency anemia in toddlers. An eighteen-month-old who consumes forty ounces of milk a day may be plump, but is probably very pale. Unless advised otherwise by your baby's doctor, limit your toddler's cow milk intake to no more than 24 ounces a day.

    Combine foods wisely. Eating a food rich in vitamin C along with a good iron source will help your body use the iron. Here are some classic examples:

    spaghetti with meat and tomato sauce
    meat and potatoes
    chicken fajitas with broccoli, sweet pepper, and tomatoes
    hamburger and coleslaw
    nitrate-free hot dogs and orange juice
    fruit, iron-fortified cereal, and raisins
    fresh fruit with raisins

    Try prune juice as a regular beverage. Prune juice is one of the few juices that is high in iron (3 milligrams of iron per cup). The process involved in making prune juice retains more of the fruit's original nutrients than the juicing of other fruits.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    239

    Default Re: No BM Blood Specialist!!

    No need to wean or to stop night feeds. I did not give my children juice or water much at this age. They did eat table foods of their choice. I brought them to the table for each meal and snack, actually they were usually the first ones there while I was preparing the food. A teaspoon or so of each item (not choking hazards) were placed on their tray or plate and they did what they needed to with it. If I were serving a meat they could not eat I would mince it fine, mash it with a fork or offer an alternative protien like chopped egg.

    I don't see the value of juice at all but think it is better to offer whole fruits diced fine for toddlers.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    436

    Default Re: No BM Blood Specialist!!

    I have to say that this is really infuriating that they would say this to your DF and make him think that BF is the problem. My DS was also diagnosed with anemia at about the same age (13 months). At that point he was nursing A LOT and wasn't too enthusiastic about solids. In that sense, I think the lack of eating enough iron-rich solids could have contributed to anemia. But in no way is breastmilk the cause!!!!!! My ped did not tell me to stop nursing -- she just told me to feed him lots of iron-rich foods and to give him iron drops (fer-in-sol). I decided not to give him the iron drops because they were upsetting his stomach, but instead I followed Andrea's advice and gave him Floradix, the natural iron tonic. Before giving it to him, I asked the ped about it and she looked it over and said it was a good supplement. It has some honey it, but since your LO is over one year it should be fine.

    I also did a few other things like stopping nursing him before meals so that he would be hungrier for solids, which seemed to help. Good iron rich foods we've used are lentils and beans, chicken/turkey, dark greens (if you can get her to eat them), oatmeal, eggs, sweet potato, chick peas, whole grains like quinoa, kamut, and millet, and iron-fortified cereal (like cheerios), etc. Oh, and watermelon, which is really high in very absorbable iron. There's a good page someplace that gives iron content in food -- Andrea, do you know where that is?

    A couple of things to be careful of: try not to give iron-rich foods when you are also giving calcium rich foods (like milk and dairy products), since calcium interferes with iron absorption. That's why too much milk can be a problem. And as the PP said, try to give some vitamin C foods with iron-rich foods to increase absorption.

    With the Floradix and iron-rich foods we succeeded in getting his iron levels up to a reasonable level in about six weeks (although it was still low-normal). I"m still giving him a teaspoon of Floradix most days and working on diet, to maintain and build iron levels. It sounds like your LO has a pretty acute case -- do you know what the hemoglobin level was?

    Just so you know, my DS is now 21 months and we are still nursing morning and nights and he is a healthy, alert and lively little boy. So stopping breastfeeding is not the answer. But you may need to change your nursing patterns a bit so that she can build an appetite for iron-rich foods. And if she has a really severe case of anemia, you might need to give iron drops -- although I would recommend diet and floradix as an alternative. Floradix provides iron in a form which is more easily absorbed than most iron drops, although the dosing is not as intensive. Good luck, and please know that breastfeeding can still provide a lot of benefits for your little girl!
    Annie
    Mama to Jeremy Daniel (12/10/2005)


    I'm a late cloth convert...and you? :tumbsup

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,197

    Default Re: No BM Blood Specialist!!

    First of all, giving a child (or any human being) juice at night is the most ridiculous advice I have ever heard. It is an invitation for cavities not to mention a big sleep disturber with all the sugar hike it leads to. Secondly, the iron in BM is far better absorbed than the artificial iron in formula so giving formula is a ridiculous advice too. What were babies doing a hundred years ago when there was no formula?? Giving an anemic child cow's milk is even more unsound since cow's milk prevents the absorption of iron in other foods and can cause tiny bleedings in the intestines which means more loss of iron.
    I think what your child needs is more iron-rich solids like egg yolks and red meat along with BF. You can also give iron supplements along with some vitamin C rich foods since vit C increases the absorption of iron when they are taken together.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    110

    Default Re: No BM Blood Specialist!!



    Thank you ladies so much, I just knew that I was not muy loco and the doctor was. I get her results on Monday and I can not wait to see how much they think this method has fixed her levels. I am looking into the natural iron supplement that was suggested and some humphreys as well.... her poor teethies 3 at once....

    She is as strong as the day before she went into the hospital. If not strong then more determined as ever to stay the he!! away from doctors.

    I will try to get her day care providers....her aunty and gramy to give her more fruit and and and eggs. I know she loves them scrambled with a little toast...

    my, oh my is she a little person.... cant believe it.....

    When I get her results, I will be sure to update.

    Thanks again
    If she didnt reach for me at birth I still wouldn't believe that she's all mine.

    Terrible 2s dont exist... Who am I kidding?!?

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