Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: HELP - Still have lots of questions...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    7

    Default HELP - Still have lots of questions...

    Hi:
    I have written several times before asking lots of questions...but, I still have more. I love breastfeeding, but I just want to make sure my baby is getting all she needs. If someone has time to read through this long thread and answer my questions, that would be GREAT! Sorry for so many questions - but I am a first time mom and just want some reassurance that all is going ok.

    Some preliminaries: my daughter has lots of pee diapers throughout the day and has one major poo, which is yellow and seedy. She was five weeks yesterday. I have been nursing and supplementing with formula, but my daughter hates the formula and my husband and I decided that I would begin just nursing exclusively and then if we are going to give a bottle, it will be with breastmilk and not formula (she is very gassy and I think it has something to do with the formula.)

    So, with that, here are my questions (sorry if some of them seem trivial or naive.)

    1. When nursing, do you ever run out of milk from a breast? Meaning, if I nurse for 25 minutes straight on one side, will the breast eventually run dry?

    2. Sometimes I hear a clicking noise when she is nursing. I think I read somewhere that a clicking noise is bad. Is it? If so, is there something I can do about it? (Interestingly, it seems to only happen when she is on my right breast.)

    3. It seems that my right breast has a very heavy let down. My daughter seems aggitated when it is happening. I have begun to remove her from the breast while it is happening (I tend to spray a lot - so I will spray into a towel and when it is done, I will put her back on the breast.) Once I do that, it seems she has a nice nursing session. Is that ok? Is she still getting enough from that breast?

    4. I am always concerned that she is not getting enough food, despite the wet diapers and her daily poo. But, everyone tells me that if she were still hungry, she would be crying. Generally, when I am done feeding her, she will either fall asleep, fuss a bit but calm down within a few seconds, or just delatch from the breast on her own and look very content. She has nice up time during the day and fusses a bit, but is certainly not crying all day. Is it true that if she were still hungry she would cry?

    5. Sometimes when she comes off the breast, she is fussy. I am able to calm her down within a few seconds by patting her on the back and holding her. I try to offer her the breast again and she generally will refuse or latch on for another few seconds before getting fussy again. It is hard for me to tell if she is fussing to tell me that she is done nursing or if she is fussing because she is still hungry and is not satisfied. Any comments/advice??

    6. My daughter seems to be very gassy. My husband and I don't know whether it is because we have been trying to give her bottles and the formula and/or bottles are causing gas or if it is from breastfeeding. We have decided to cut out the bottles for a few days and then when I reintroduce them, we will only use pumped breastmilk (we are avoiding formula at least for now.) Can my nursing be causing her a lot of gas? If so, is there anything I can do about it? It hurts me to see that she is so gassy.

    7. As I mentioned, starting in a few days, I will begin pumping milk and introducing a bottle of breastmilk. Does anyone else pump? If so, do you have any advice? My plan is to pump in lieu of a feeding and have my husband give her that bottle. (My reasoning is so that at some point if I am not with my daughter when she needs to eat, someone else can give her the bottle.) Also, are there certain bottles that you find best for a breastfed baby to use? (We tried the Dr. Brown's and the Playtex. It doesn't seem she likes either.)

    8. Sometimes when she is nursing, my daughter seems to get very frustrated at the breast. She will close her fists, get red in the face and grunt. I will take her off the breast and calm her down and then put her back on the breast. Sometimes she will nurse nicely after that, sometimes the cycle of grunting continues. Any idea what this is??

    9. Finally, how often should my daughter be feeding now? I know that in the first few weeks it was every 2 - 3 hours. Does that hold true for now also or should there be a longer period between feedings?

    Ok - as I said, this was a VERY long thread. So sorry for all the questions - but as I said, I am very new at this and am just hoping I am doing this right.

    Thanks again for anyone who took the time to read this and respond. I feel lucky that there is a support system like LLL to help us out. I am not sure that I would still be breastfeeding without the support I have been getting from LLL.

    Thanks again.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    NW OH
    Posts
    3,473

    Default Re: HELP - Still have lots of questions...

    Hi-I posted a few helpful links to the same question you posted in Newborn challenges!!
    here is a quick link to that thread
    I hope it helps you out a little!


    I'm Heather, SAHM to Cooper , born 1/2007
    and Bennett, our precious NICU grad born 8/2009
    and wife to Bill since 10/2003!
    We're young, but we know we can do it!
    Life with the Stevens-blog

    I'm an Ergo Baby Carrier affiliate!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    987

    Default Re: HELP - Still have lots of questions...

    This is a great place to get answers to your BFing questions!

    1. Your breasts don't ever 'run out' if a baby is nursing 24 hours a day on one side your body continues to make milk to keep up with the baby. Amazing! After a long nursing session on one side your breast might feel 'empty' or floppy. But that's good - it means that your baby got lots of that fatty hindmilk!

    2. Some babies make a clicking noise in response to an overactive let down. Clicking in itself isn't a problem.

    3. OALD is very annoying! Removing her so she doesn't get sprayed is a great idea. I gave DD my finger to chomp on until it was safe to re-latch her. I have super OALD on the left side and just OALD on the right. It's not odd that your breasts are a little different. Don't worry about that spilled milk. She will still get plenty of milk from that breast. Your supply works on demand so the more she eats, the more milk you will make.

    4. Her wet diapers are the best indication that she is eating enough. If you were really concerned you could take her to be weighed once a week at you peds office or buy a scale for home use. Sometime soon she might go to pooping just once a week. That often happens between 4-6 weeks. Don't get scared! You can make enough milk for her. Just be sure to offer her the breast whenever she might want it. That's the best way to ensure she is getting milk when she is hungry.

    5. My DD started pulling off the breast at about 6 weeks. Usually it was because she was gassy or had to burp. I had to start burping her sooner. When DD was really bad I would put her over my shoulder for a few minutes. Sometimes it was really hard to get a burp out of her. After she burped I would offer her the breast again.

    6. About gas. There are many possible causes. She could just be a gassy baby! If she has serious gas other possible causes are reflux, food allergies, or oversupply. For us it turned out that DD is highly allergic to milk and I had to eliminate all milk and hidden dairy from my diet. (This could be why the formula was upsetting your LO if she has a milk allergy.) I also was very much over supplied. When you have too much milk sometimes baby doesn't get enough of the fatty hindmilk and too much of the watery foremilk, which can cause major gas. If you were oversupplied you would probably know it - when I was oversupplied I woke up every morning with a wet t-shirt and 2 rock hard engorged breasts.

    7. Some babies don't like bottles. If you do not need to pump I would avoid it until after about 2-3 mos. Your body is still trying to regulate your supply. If you pump your breasts empty, it will signal your body to make more milk. I think that pumping too early helped contribute to my oversupply problems. There is a whole forum for pumpers here. It is important to remember that whenever you give a bottle you should be pumping. That will help ensure that you continue to make enough milk. It is much easier to just be with your baby when she needs to be fed, if you can, especially in the early months.

    8. Grunting may be trying to get rid of gas. You can her gassiness by giving her gripe water (from a health food store), fennel tea, myocon drops (I think I messed up the name --mycon ---) You can also help her by bicycling her legs.

    9. How often is really up to her. My DD is 4.5 mos and still feeds every 2 hours during the day. Every once in a while she will go longer. Try to pay attention to what she does when she is hungry - and feed her when she wants to eat.

    HTH

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,864

    Default Re: HELP - Still have lots of questions...

    I have a four-month-old son, and I had lots and lots of questions too! Here are my thoughts, and I'm sure you'll get lots of responses from other people too who may have more experience than I have.

    1. You won't run out of milk. Your breasts are never really completely empty; the milk just becomes richer because the baby gets more of the hindmilk.

    2. I don't have experience with the clicking noise, but I've read that it's related to latch. Maybe her position is a little different on that side? I've run into that with Thomas; sometimes he seems more comfortable or more content on one side or the other, and I feed in different positions on each side, so for me I think that's probably the issue.

    3. That shouldn't affect how much milk she gets. It probably just makes it easier for her to handle what she does get on that side.

    4. This is one I can definitely relate to! I have asked this question myself (many times! ), and this is what I can tell you: If she has plenty of wets and dirties--and it sounds like she does--she is probably getting plenty. I panic periodically and become convinced that Thomas is not growing at the rate he should be, and I post the question again and get reassurance from the ladies here. Then we go for a checkup and the doctor says he is growing exactly as he should be. I think seeing them every day makes it hard to tell sometimes. (Before long, you will probably be answering this one for me again! )

    5. Sometimes Thomas comes off fussy too, but in his case it's usually due to needing to burp. I offer the breast again, but a lot of times he's full. It is true that she will let you know if she's not satisfied.

    6. Thomas is very gassy too. He's not had formula, so I think it's a combination of maybe something I eat and the normal process of taking in some air as he nurses/takes a break/nurses again. Our pediatrician says it's fine to give him Mylicon, which some people swear by. We've tried it once, but I find that allowing him to sit up tends to get rid of it just as well. The other thing we do is to place him on his back and "bicycyle" his legs, pressing them into his tummy a little. Frequently this works better than anything else.

    7. I have been pumping since the day after Thomas was born because he was not able to leave the nursery or to be nursed for a few days. I went back to work full-time when he was 8 weeks old, so have been pumping for that reason too. I think it's a great idea to have a stash in case someone else needs to feed her, or for some time when you HAVE to have a break--which will happen! I would be cautious about substituting feeding for pumping, mainly because she will do a much better job of getting milk from your breasts than the pump will, which will in turn stimulate more production. Is there any way you could add a pumping session in addition to the feedings you're doing now? A lot of people pump after the first morning feeding, when most people have the most supply. Also, many breastfed babies have difficulty accepting bottles, especially if Mom is the one offering the bottle. Thomas likes the Playtex, but we also have good luck with the Breastflow, which is very similar to nursing in that the baby has to stimulate a "letdown" from the nipple. My sister-in-law swears by these.

    8. Not sure, maybe gas? Or maybe uncomfortable positioning?

    9. I think that varies a lot. She may eat every 2-3 hours for months. Thomas's schedule tended to be every 3-4 hours at that age, sometimes more frequently, and then around 8 weeks he began sleeping all night. Now he eats about every 3-4 hours during the day, and every 2 or so once I get home until bedtime.

    I know what you mean--I doubt I would have made it this far without the help I've had from the people on these forums. Ask away!


    Paula

  5. #5

    Default Re: HELP - Still have lots of questions...

    Hi there

    Good for you for decided to exclusively breastfeed your baby! There are NO SUCH THING as trivial or naive questions around here! We're happy to answer any question, no matter how small!

    1. When nursing, do you ever run out of milk from a breast? Meaning, if I nurse for 25 minutes straight on one side, will the breast eventually run dry?
    Nope. Your breasts will never be truly empty. They are constantly making milk. Let baby finish the first breast first--nurse until she comes off on her own or falls asleep. If she's awake and acting hungry, you can offer the second side. Start on the second side at the next feeding.

    2. Sometimes I hear a clicking noise when she is nursing. I think I read somewhere that a clicking noise is bad. Is it? If so, is there something I can do about it? (Interestingly, it seems to only happen when she is on my right breast.)
    As a PP said, it might be how your baby deals with a heavy letdown. Are you feeling any pain with this clicking? How does her latch look?

    3. It seems that my right breast has a very heavy let down. My daughter seems aggitated when it is happening. I have begun to remove her from the breast while it is happening (I tend to spray a lot - so I will spray into a towel and when it is done, I will put her back on the breast.) Once I do that, it seems she has a nice nursing session. Is that ok? Is she still getting enough from that breast?
    Sounds exactly right. It's what we suggest to a lot of mothers. As she gets older, you'll probably find that your supply will settle down a bit and she'll get better at handling the flow.

    4. I am always concerned that she is not getting enough food, despite the wet diapers and her daily poo. But, everyone tells me that if she were still hungry, she would be crying. Generally, when I am done feeding her, she will either fall asleep, fuss a bit but calm down within a few seconds, or just delatch from the breast on her own and look very content. She has nice up time during the day and fusses a bit, but is certainly not crying all day. Is it true that if she were still hungry she would cry?
    We like to see babies this age having 2-3 dirty diapers per day, but that can change around 6 weeks and she's close to that. How has her weight gain been?

    Generally, a baby that is content between feedings is getting enough to eat. Crying is a late hunger cue--you want to look for signs like rooting and chewing on fists. When those show up, it's time to start offering the breast.

    5. Sometimes when she comes off the breast, she is fussy. I am able to calm her down within a few seconds by patting her on the back and holding her. I try to offer her the breast again and she generally will refuse or latch on for another few seconds before getting fussy again. It is hard for me to tell if she is fussing to tell me that she is done nursing or if she is fussing because she is still hungry and is not satisfied. Any comments/advice??
    Do you notice a pattern to this? Does it happen at the same time every day? Some babies have a "fussy time" where they are just generally cranky and sometimes it's difficult to soothe them. Most outgrow this by 3 months or so. If she's calmed by patting and holding, and gets fussy if you offer the breast, then she's probably done with nursing for the moment. She'll let you know when it's time again. Follow her cues!

    6. My daughter seems to be very gassy. My husband and I don't know whether it is because we have been trying to give her bottles and the formula and/or bottles are causing gas or if it is from breastfeeding. We have decided to cut out the bottles for a few days and then when I reintroduce them, we will only use pumped breastmilk (we are avoiding formula at least for now.) Can my nursing be causing her a lot of gas? If so, is there anything I can do about it? It hurts me to see that she is so gassy.
    Bottles can definitely contribute to gas because baby swallows more air when she eats from a bottle. I'll be interested to see if cutting the bottles out solves the problem. Some newborns are just gassier than others--they have immature digestive systems. If she's passing the gas and it doesn't seem to be causing her a lot of discomfort or pain, then it's not a problem.

    Sometimes babies are sensitive to something mom is eating and that can cause them to be a little gassy as well. If cutting the bottles out doesn't solve a lot of the problem, you might try keeping a food diary for a week or two to see if you can spot a pattern.

    7. As I mentioned, starting in a few days, I will begin pumping milk and introducing a bottle of breastmilk. Does anyone else pump? If so, do you have any advice? My plan is to pump in lieu of a feeding and have my husband give her that bottle. (My reasoning is so that at some point if I am not with my daughter when she needs to eat, someone else can give her the bottle.) Also, are there certain bottles that you find best for a breastfed baby to use? (We tried the Dr. Brown's and the Playtex. It doesn't seem she likes either.)
    I would suggest you be very careful with this practice. Some mothers find this works for them. Others find that it leads to problems such as low milk supply, and nipple preference. Because she's five weeks and has been switching back and forth, there's probably no need for you to do this every day. There are plenty of ways Daddy can be involved without directly feeding.

    8. Sometimes when she is nursing, my daughter seems to get very frustrated at the breast. She will close her fists, get red in the face and grunt. I will take her off the breast and calm her down and then put her back on the breast. Sometimes she will nurse nicely after that, sometimes the cycle of grunting continues. Any idea what this is??
    Many babies do this when they are trying to pass gas or have a bowel movement.

    9. Finally, how often should my daughter be feeding now? I know that in the first few weeks it was every 2 - 3 hours. Does that hold true for now also or should there be a longer period between feedings?
    The answer is that there is no answer to this question. It depends so much on various factors between you and your baby. The best thing to do is follow baby's cues and let her nurse when she wants to. Following schedules or trying to space out feedings is a practice that can be harmful to your breastfeeding relationship. She should be nursing AT LEAST 8-12 times per 24 hours--HOWEVER, this does not translate out to "every 2-3 hours". The overall number is what is important. Some babies will feed more frequently at one time of the day and sleep a longer stretch during another part of the day. Babies are good little self-regulators. Just let her take the lead!

    Hang in there mama! You're making a GREAT decision! Let us know what else we can help you with!
    Jen
    "Mothers are designed to be available to their babies--to help them make the transition into this big, wide world. To teach them to trust, and love, and feel good about being alive."
    --Elizabeth N. Baldwin, Esq., So I Nursed Him Every 45 Minutes

    Click here to find your local LLL Group
    How to tell if your breastfed baby is getting enough milk!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •