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Thread: Induction and milk supply.

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    100

    Default Re: Induction and milk supply.

    I had read pp here and three things:
    First, I was induced with ds3 and no problems with milk supply at all and he was being induced 3 weeks early due to Gestational Diabetes and he was estamated at being close to 8lbs. Which oddly enough he was close.
    Two, with ds3 dr though I might have had retained placenta. If you had retained placenta from my understanding you would have had really high fever and all that goes with having any kind of infection.
    Thirdly, 3rd degree tear would have nothing to do with low milk supply. With dd I had a 4th degree tear and hemoragged(sp) and no impact on milk supply.

    I don't think the induction it self, retained placenta or even the 3rd degree tear had anything to do with low milk supply. I would probably go with the fact they might have had gestational age off way too much.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    63

    Default Re: Induction and milk supply.

    I was induced three times, and after 5 days of contractions with no dilation, I had an em-C-section. DS was 39+ weeks at that point. The placenta had calcified and failed (which is why they were trying to induce 'early'), baby's heartbeat was also slow, and movements reduced.

    I know it doesnt help you, but my milk came in around day 4 or 5, and DS did fine on colostrum at the beginning.

    I would suspect it's a gestational age thing, rather than induction.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    190

    Default Re: Induction and milk supply.

    Quote Originally Posted by LLLCarol

    What kinds of breast changes did you experience during pregnancy?
    None, really. I had sensitive nipples from the day I found out I was pregnant, no change (and only a cup, maybe) in size until my milk came in.

    I wasn't engorged either.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    63

    Default Re: Induction and milk supply.

    I think LLCarol might be onto something, North, because during my pregnancy I went from an A cup to a C cup by 30 weeks, and my chest had expanded by 6 (!) inches. I was also engorged when the milk came in.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    683

    Default Re: Induction and milk supply.

    Hmmm...well, I'm kind of wondering if you aren't suffering from insufficient glandular tissue. It's very rare, but it does exist. Refresh my memory -- have you seen an IBCLC?

    Regardless though, baby still benefits from any amount of breastmilk that she receives so I'd encourage you to continue nursing, even if you still have to supplement

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    100

    Default Re: Induction and milk supply.

    I don't agree with that every woman has an increase in breast size. During pregnancy and even now, my breast size is way smaller than before I got pregnant. Apprently according to the scale not affecting son at all.

    But like pp stated it could be insufficient glandular tissue though. But breast not increasing in size much doesn't affect bf.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    190

    Default Re: Induction and milk supply.

    Quote Originally Posted by LLLCarol
    have you seen an IBCLC?
    Yup, but that was in the begining (she was only days old), and all she said was that she was a sleepy baby, and was helping me to keep her awake through a full meal.

    Then I saw another LC and she confirmed DD has a good latch and suck, and helped me with some other positions, which I still don't find that comfortable (cradle with the boppy works the best for us).

    So far I've manage to keep away from formula. I had to use one formula bottle on Sunday, that was about it, but I'm BARELY making it.

    DD normally nurses to sleep. It is my most cherished session by far, I look forward to that time of day (laying on the bed with her unwinding), but the last few nights she has fought me on it. I've burped her, I've tried changing positions, nothing seems to help. It's like she's getting frustrated that there isn't anything there. She's also been waking earlier, like she didn't get enough to eat. She normally sleeps straight though till 2:30-3, but has been waking at 1.

    I've still been pumping after every session, and in between if she's napping or something. I was supposed to have a doctors appointment this morning but had to reschedule till Thursday. It really feels like the end is sight. Every week is an accomplishment without formula. It's a day to day thing. I eat, sleep, breath and dream breastfeeding. My husband said I woke up in my sleep the other night screaming at him for taking bottles of EBM out of the fridge and not replacing them. Apparently I told HIM to go pump!! It's getting that bad!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    683

    Default Re: Induction and milk supply.

    Well, I wouldn't let her "routine" sway you -- babies are notorious for switching it up just as soon as we get used to it being one way. Baby wanting to nurse non-stop or being fussy at the breast is not an indication of low supply.

    Also, try not to dispair! Breastfeeding is NOT an all-or-nothing deal. You're doing a fantastic job as it is and should you need to supplement, you can STILL breastfeed. You know, even if there's absolutely nothing there (which I doubt will ever happen with you), just the comfort-factor alone is good reason to continue nursing.

    Have you tried an SNS? Can you get back to see the IBCLC?

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,168

    Default Re: Induction and milk supply.

    Quote Originally Posted by North_Of_60
    It really feels like the end is sight. Every week is an accomplishment without formula. It's a day to day thing. I eat, sleep, breath and dream breastfeeding.
    I want to underscore Carol's comment that breastfeeding is NOT all-or-nothing. Of course you will feed your baby formula if that is necessary. That does NOT mean the end of your breastfeeding relationship.

    I think people hear LLL's message about exclusive breastfeeding and the risks of formula and think that this means we frown on giving formula under ANY circumstance. Not true. It's just that we see SO many mothers being pressured or misled into thinking that formula is just as good, or that one bottle a day isn't going to do any harm -- and the typical outcome of this unnecessary introduction of formula is that it disrupts the breastfeeding relationship in ways that could have been avoided.

    But when breastfeeding isn't working well, for whatever reason, then formula may be necessary -- and at these times, we're grateful for the stuff! When my son was almost 6 months old, I suffered an acute allergic reaction to an antibiotic and almost completely lost my milk supply. We had to supplement with formula for 2 weeks while I pumped to rebuild my supply. It was upsetting to me, but I was so grateful that we had access to an acceptable alternative source of nutrition for him. I was lucky that we were able to re-establish exclusive breastfeeding after 2 weeks, but if that had not happened, I doubt I would have weaned altogether. Any breastmilk is better than no breastmilk, and the benefits of nursing go far beyond the milk, too.

    It's obvious that you have been working incredibly hard, that you and your daughter have already overcome major obstacles in order to breastfeed at all, and that you are under a great deal of physical and emotional stress right now. I'm worried when you say "the end is in sight" as if regular supplementation with formula would thus signal the end of your breastfeeding relationship. I'm still hopeful that you, with appropriate help and support, will be able to surmount this latest obstacle of low supply -- but until that happens, I think it would be okay for you to give yourself permission to give some formula, as necessary, without feeling that you are failing your daughter or losing a battle. Can formula supplements just be another one of the tools that helps you continue to breastfeed?

    Most of all I wish I could give you a hug -- that's the biggest drawback to messagboards; all we have are parentheses to hug with:

    ((((((((North_Of_60))))))))

    --Rebecca

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    190

    Default Re: Induction and milk supply.

    Thank you guys. It really is a source of inspiration to come here and read the support. Thanx!!

    Carol, I had hoped to ask about the SNS at my appointment, but since it got changed I have to wait until tomorrow.

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