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Thread: Do you find it creepy when they talk about it?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    124

    Default Re: Do you find it creepy when they talk about it?

    Quote Originally Posted by LadyGodiva
    No other toy 'nurses' as much as his doll. He even nurses it, LOL!
    There is one car (his beloved Citroën 2CV) that gets nursed. He loves that toy, it is somehow special to him.

    I feel that for him Love = Nursing. I think this is very healthy and natural. After all, that's what he sees, what he lives day in, day out........
    First, LOL! I love that he nurses his car! But, more importantly, I really love what you said above. I think that's what's so great about extended nursing -- that you can actually see in their actions how much the nursing relationship means to them. It's so, so touching.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    97

    Default Re: Do you find it creepy when they talk about it?

    As time goes by, I find I'm letting myself enjoy it more. It's true, there's something intensely pleasurable, interesting and funny about watching a child's relationship with the breast change, and being part of that. My daughter (21 months) now has a very deeply personified idea of my breasts: like if she's latched on uncomfortably, and i say, "Ow, that's sore", she says, "Oh, poor Nanna! Feel better, don't be sad, cuddle it". She wants my breasts to get the best of everything: like when I ask her if she wants a yummy strawberry, she says, "Nanna have it, give it nanna". I agree that it's very cute when dolls, teddies, cars etc. get a go (I've given up on banning that, I just limit it to when nobody else is around).

    The ancient Greek writer Plutarch (lived in 1st-2nd centuries AD) wrote a very beautiful, tear-jerking consolation letter to his wife, after the death of their youngest daughter, at about the age my daughter is now. It's almost too sad to read, at least for people with young children. But there's a very sweet part in it about how generous and kind this little girl was: she had so much "philanthropia" that she would offer her wet-nurse's breast, the dearest thing in her life, to her dolls and even to other children, to console and comfort them.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    135

    Default Re: Do you find it creepy when they talk about it?

    I feel ambivalent about it. I am tandem nursing and have experienced some nursing aversion after baby was born, so I restrict my toddler's nursing. Otherwise I would probably be more positive about it.

    I think it is very funny and cute when my two-year-old peeps down the front of my t-shirt and says: "Ahhh! Now what have we got here?" The teddies and dolls all get a turn, too, and she will nurse them, too, or make them nurse each other. This ist probably a good basis for my potential grandchildren!

    I don't let her fondle my breasts, I tell her they don't like being tickled. I also tell her they are shy and don't like other people to see them. As for people hearing her talk, I'm not bothered. Most people won't understand her anyway (we speak German together), and even if they do, I think it is very acceptable for a child to ask to "drink Mami-milk". I always offered her "milk" and not "breast", so there is one embarrassment that we avoid.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    1,168

    Default Re: Do you find it creepy when they talk about it?

    Quote Originally Posted by emilyw
    But there's a very sweet part in it about how generous and kind this little girl was: she had so much "philanthropia" that she would offer her wet-nurse's breast, the dearest thing in her life, to her dolls and even to other children, to console and comfort them.

    Oh, wow -- that just gave me chills! There are few things in human experience that are truly universal -- but breastfeeding comes awfully close -- and this makes me feel so connected to that family from 2000 years ago. Thank you for sharing that story.

    --Rebecca

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    15

    Default Re: Do you find it creepy when they talk about it?

    Not at all . . . I've always found it strange when people say you should wean them when they're old enough to ask for it. With any other food, other people like grandparents are THRILLED when the kid can ask for something, and fall over themselves to give the kid the cookie (or whatever), saying, "isn't that cute, he asked for a cookie!" Why should it be any different for nursing?! Besides, they can come up with some really sweet and cute stories

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    16

    Default Re: Do you find it creepy when they talk about it?

    Show your DD how she can nurse her dolls if she doesn't all ready. My DS still teases my youngerst dd about getting her moo-moo, and he is 7 years old. I'm glad he has seen me nursing and understand what our breasts are for. Keep loving that babyand enjoy the time you have whil nursing.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    189

    Smile Re: Do you find it creepy when they talk about it?

    I don't think it is creepy, but I do wonder if breastfed boys become "breast men" when they are older. My husband was not breastfed and has never been a big breast man, he's more of a butt guy...lol

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    18

    Default Re: Do you find it creepy when they talk about it?

    My standard, somewhat sassy, response to this is: aren't they always "asking" for it somehow?

    Whether it be sucking on a fist, rooting or crying as a newborn or signing milk, saying "nurse" or lifting up your shirt as a toddler, aren't they conveying their desire to nurse to you one way or another?

    I don't think it's creepy at all; in fact, I love that she can talk about it now. I love that she says "mmm" and that she says "nice" and gives my breasts hugs. I like to know how much she appreciates them/me.

    Slightly different than what you asked, but definitely relevant.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    7

    Default Re: Do you find it creepy when they talk about it?

    I was so glad to see I am not the only one! My daughter is 21 months old, and also very verbal. She loves to sit on my lap and talk to her 'nanas'...She says they are "so cute" and "little tiny nunnies". I haven't had any stuffed animal encounters yet, but she likes to read with them! She definitely finds a great deal of comfort when she cuddles and nurses, but it seems like sometimes when we are playing if she gets close to them she wants to stop playing to nurse. I have been able to tell her that nanas are only for at home, so I have stopped nursing in public because of the same fears about her talking to them out loud, maybe you could try the same. Sometimes she asks for them and caresses them in public though, and it is pretty obvious what she wants. It kind of freaks me out too, although it is pretty cute, and I had all the same questions! Does anyone have any advice about how/when to wean? I don't know anyone else who has continued to nurse for this long. My husband and I joke about her wanting nanas at her high school graduation...There doesn't seem to be an end in sight!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    89

    Default Re: Do you find it creepy when they talk about it?

    When my 18 mo dd wants mom's milk she asks for "mil-ka-ka." (In Germany, where we live, "kaka" is poop, so I have been trying to get her to ask for "milky" instead. . . ) Anyway, the trainee at her day care (whom she loves) is named Moritz and is known to her as "Mo-ka-ka" (also kind of embarassing). At day care, they have told me that dd asks occasionally for "Mo-ka-ka", leaving me to wonder which one she actually wants . . . ?

    Also the other day, when she wanted to nurse, she started shouting "Open door!", meaning she wanted me to open the flaps of my nursing bra. I thought it was pretty funny, but I was glad we were at home.

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