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Thread: help with clicking noise

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: help with clicking noise

    One way to tell if your latch is good is to check the shape of your nipple when it comes out of your baby's mouth at the end of a feeding. If the nipple looks creased or beveled (like a new lipstick), then the nipple is being pinched between the tongue and hard palate.

    The nipple should look round, the same shape as when it went in. When in the baby's mouth, the nipple should be near the soft palate (you can feel this in your own mouth by sliding your tongue back). Try making sure your baby is VERY close to your body (think plastered to you), and lining up the nose with the nipple, so baby's lower jaw will take a good inch to inch and a half of areola.

    See this site for a graphic:
    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/start/bas...resources.html

    If you just can't get the latch to be comfortable, consider seeing an IBCLC lactation consultant. Clicking is not a problem if mom is comfortable and baby is getting plenty of milk, but I am concerned that you are still experiencing sore nipples.

    Lynnette Hafken, IBCLC

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: help with clicking noise

    To LLLTallis

    Some extra posts re short frenulum would be great. My 11 week old son has a short frenulum. The midwife mentioned that he had a heart shaped tongue but not too serious. Being my fourth bf child I was surprised at how I had to be very careful with his latching in the early weeks. He now also makes a noise as if he is breaking the suction continually during the feed. Although not every feed. He also has trouble coping with the let-down and sometimes refuses to feed on the side with the stronger let-down. Could this be because of the short frenulum?

    in the beginning he was slow to put on weight, but he did begin at a very healthy 10lb, but isn't putting on copious amounts of weight like his siblings did.

    Thank you in advance for any further suggestions.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    43

    Default Re: help with clicking noise

    Here are some pages that have all the info you (n)ever wanted to know about short frenula (ankyloglossia):

    http://www.lalecheleague.org/llleade...rMay02p27.html
    http://www.kellymom.com/babyconcerns...tonguetie.html

    The most difficult part about getting it clipped can be finding a physician who either knows about this issue or is willing to learn. The more references you can bring, the better. You are an experienced mother who knows how breastfeeding should feel, and you already suspect that the tight frenulum may be preventing your son from getting as much milk as he wants.

    You might ask local Leaders and lactation consultants who they refer to.

    Keep us posted about what happens, ok?

    Warmly,
    LLLLynnette

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: help with clicking noise

    thanks again for all the replies. i do believe that we have a good latch, though we didn't early on which led to the cracked nipples. but now we have thrush. so now we're dealing with that. i suspect that is the reason for the clicking noise and pain. i just keep telling myself that this too shall pass.

    shelley

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    130

    Default Re: help with clicking noise

    Hi Shelley
    I would definitely check for tongue-tie...if in doubt, you could see an ENT (Ear, Nose and Throat) specialist. I can vouch for the pain that a tongue-tied baby can cause!
    Many tongue-tied babies nurse better in the clutch/football hold because it lets them get a deeper latch. That adjustment in hold may or may not be enough for the baby to really nurse effectively, though. As for the other aspects of tongue-tie....what Tallis said.

    I had my son's tongue clipped on day four and noticed an *immediate* change in the way he nursed. He did continue to click while nursing until he was about three months old, *but* it no longer hurt to nurse *and* he was gaining well and was satisfied after nursing. (Watch the baby, watch the baby). Both my kids have a very high palate, however, and that may have contributed to the clicking.

    Do contact a local Leader. She can observe and see what is happening and help you find resources so breastfeeding becomes painless and enjoyable.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    106

    Default Re: help with clicking noise

    our son (about 2 montsh old) makes clicking noise once a while and loses the lacth.is this an issue.he clicks like one or twice in a whole 24 hour day.

    also just to make sure, click noise exactly-is this like teh noise we make when we eat a popsicle is it..
    thanks

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