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Thread: Night feeding becoming a problem?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    29

    Default Re: Need help with low milk supply

    I noticed a better supply by taking 9 fenugreek tabs a day. 6 just didn't cut it for me. Mother's Milk Tea also really helps me. Oatmeal helped me, too, but we had to stop because my son is allergic to it.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Night feeding becoming a problem?

    I wish I knew why my milk levels were low -- they just have been since he was about 2 months old. I've done everything to try to increase supply -- go on nursing/pumping vacations, nurse constantly almost, work on latch, take fenugreek and domperidone (am still taking domperidone). I produce almost enough for him to be exclusively breastfed, but he's supplemented about 4 oz per day of formula and he's eating a bit of solids now -- he showed interest and just loves eating sweet potatoes and avocados! I really think that my supply is very very sensitive to not getting enough protein in my diet, and stress (am defending PhD soon). Thanks for the post!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    12

    Default Re: Night feeding becoming a problem?

    I think what LLL LactoJen was getting at is why do you think your supply is low? Do you think your supply is low because of how frequently he nurses or because of how much you can pump out? Don't judge what you are making by what you can pump out. Pumping is a skill that can take time to develop and everyone's body reacts differently to it. Remember that there is no "rule" as to how often a baby should be nursing. If you nurse on demand, then your body will make the milk he needs. Does he seem satisfied after he feeds? Is he gaining weight and making at least 5 wet diapers (disposable) a day? Then he's probably getting just what he needs and you're making what he needs. Also know that as long as you are supplementing, then your body isn't being told to make that extra milk so it never will. If you stop supplementing, then you will likely notice your son wanting to nurse more frequently for a few days until your supply adjusts.

    That said, you mentioned being under alot of stress and I personally have found stress to limit my ability to letdown very easily and maybe to a lesser extent to limit my supply. It might help you to find a way to release the stress or to find time to relax, but that's probably gonna be hard to do until you are done defending your PhD. A yoga class might be helpful!

    And just so you know you're not alone, both of my sons were frequent nursers. My first one nursed nearly every hour to an hour and half. People frequently told me I should supplement him, but i never did and he grew just fine and is a smart and funny 3 year old now. His pediatrician and the hospital lactation consultant told me I was doing everything just right so I never worried about it. My second son has been a constant night nurser. He can easily go 3 or 4 hours during the day (with solid foods in between sometimes), but wakes up about every hour and half to 2 hours from the time he goes to bed until he gets up in the morning. He didn't do this at all from birth to two months, but from then until now (11months) he's beeing waking up. There is nothing wrong with it... other than my interupted sleep! I get better sleep by bringing him to bed with me the first time he wakes up after I've gone to bed. That way I fall asleep while he's nursing and can rest until he wakes me the next time. Oh, and as for pumping, I have gotten really good at bfing my babies, but have NEVER managed to pump well. It takes me 3 pumping sessions to make 4 oz! So I just don't bother unless I'm going out and want to leave some milk for him, and then I start pumping a week ahead of time.

    Sorry this got so long! I just felt really bad that you are having these worries. Maybe LLL LactoJen will be back and have some more comments to help you, but it sounds like you're doing what you need to be doing and maybe worried about a problem that you think you have but doesn't really exist? Good luck on your PhD and try to relax!

    Chris

  4. #14

    Default Re: Night feeding becoming a problem?

    Quote Originally Posted by 2boys4me
    I think what LLL LactoJen was getting at is why do you think your supply is low? Do you think your supply is low because of how frequently he nurses or because of how much you can pump out?
    Exactly! Can you give more detail?
    Jen
    "Mothers are designed to be available to their babies--to help them make the transition into this big, wide world. To teach them to trust, and love, and feel good about being alive."
    --Elizabeth N. Baldwin, Esq., So I Nursed Him Every 45 Minutes

    Click here to find your local LLL Group
    How to tell if your breastfed baby is getting enough milk!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Night feeding becoming a problem?

    I know my supply is low because he's had weight gain issues, he's not satisfied at the breast. We don't go longer than 2 hours without nursing, I'd say in general he nurses every 1 to 1.5 hours. I've done weeks of the nursing/pumping constantly bit, go to a lactation consultant, have even been in contact with Jack Newman, a well-known breastfeeding guru. I'm not on the verge of giving up breastfeeding or nightfeeding, was just wondering if his lack of draining the breast at night might be a contributor to my low supply. Some women truely have a low supply, and unfortunately I am one of those women! In any case, we're making the best of it that we can. Thanks for your comments and advice!

  6. #16

    Default Re: Night feeding becoming a problem?

    Ah, okay. Are you still seeing a lactation consultant?

    Jen
    "Mothers are designed to be available to their babies--to help them make the transition into this big, wide world. To teach them to trust, and love, and feel good about being alive."
    --Elizabeth N. Baldwin, Esq., So I Nursed Him Every 45 Minutes

    Click here to find your local LLL Group
    How to tell if your breastfed baby is getting enough milk!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,156

    Smile Re: Need help with low milk supply

    Hello

    I would recommed trying Traditional Medicinals Organic Mother's Milk Herbal tea. I put the mother's milk tea bag with the Traditional Medicinals Organic Raspberry Leaf (supports the Female system) bag. I started drinking the tea the minute I was able to in the hospital, and I think the tea is the reason why my milk supply is so great! I mix the two because the Mother's milk alone dosen't taste so great. You can get the Tea at Vitamins cottage Whole Foods and Wild Oats. My son was about a month old and I had stopped drinking the tea only because I ran out, and I tell you what my milk supply started going down, so I went to the store, and I now drink about 1-2 cups a day. You should really try it!!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    3

    Lightbulb Re: Need help with low milk supply

    Quote Originally Posted by LLLnormaR
    Drinking more water does NOT increase supply. In fact, if you drink too much, your supply decreases. All you need to do is to drink when you are thirsty!
    LLLnormaR: How is this possible? With all due respect, it just doesn't make sense to me. Please explain if you will. Thanks!
    Meg

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    77

    Default Re: Need help with low milk supply/NOW how breasts work

    Quote Originally Posted by megmcgarry
    LLLnormaR: How is this possible? With all due respect, it just doesn't make sense to me. Please explain if you will. Thanks!
    Meg
    Hi Meg - good question!
    It is because of the way the breast works. Let me explain.

    When a woman births a baby, her hormone levels change and tell her body to start releasing colostrum, the first milk. Over the next 10 to 14 days, her milk gradually becomes more mature and greater in volume.

    Even if she does not put her babe to her breast, she will still produce milk and, eventually, find herself engorged. After the while. however, her milk supply will gradually diminish, because a secondary system comes into play. When this happens, the supply is totally dependant on milk removal. If the mother does not nurse or pump, her milk will simply disappear.

    To establish a good milk supply, mothers need to feed their babies often, usually about 8 to 12 times in every 24 hour period, during the first few weeks. It takes about 6-8 weeks to establish a supply, and about the same length of time for the baby to learn how to nurse.

    The amount of milk a mother produces is directly related to the amount that is removed from her breasts. She can HELP her supply - if there is a problem - by nursing more frequently. Some mothers also take various herbs and drugs, but they ONLY work if the mother ALSO nurses (or pumps) more often.

    Nursing mothers do need to drink enough to keep their bodies hydrated, but this is usually achieved by simply drinking when thirsty. In fact, too much water can have the opposite effect, and suppress the milk supply!

    Meg, please let me know if I have answered your question adequately and if there is anything else you would like to know.

    warmly,
    LLLnormaR
    Moderator

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: Night feeding becoming a problem?

    I never believed in the power of OATMEAL until 2 days ago. Have a nice bowl for breakfast and dinner with some maple syrup, it does wonders !! Thanks to all the ladies who mentioned oatmeal, awesome advise !

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