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Thread: grazing

  1. #1
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    Aug 2006
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    Default grazing

    my lo doesn't want to sit in the high chair too long.. he's almost 1 year old and still not having the recommended daily amounts of solid. i think he's around 17 pounds.

    should i follow him around and sneak food in? all the books say this is a no-no. do you allow your lo to graze throughout the day or give him big meals?

  2. #2
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    May 2006
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    Default Re: grazing

    Actually, Dr. Sears does advocate grazing, and he even gives suggestions of what to put on a tray for grazing toddlers. Check out his website, you'll get the whole explanation there, www.askdrsears.com

    I don't think there's anything wrong with grazing either, but I do try to make sure we have 3 set meals every day, and I allow all the healthy snacks my boys want in between meals and before bed.

    As far as a recommended amount of solids goes, I'm curious where you're getting a figure for a recommended amount? The only figures I've ever found, are from Gerber, and I and lots of other moms find those to be grossly overinflated compared to what our kids eat. So check the source, if its from a source that is selling you something, especially if its food that's specific to your child, then I'm not sure you can trust the source.

    As far as the weight goes, it does sound low, just hearing the figure, but I don't know anything about your child's body structure, height, or growth curve. Does your doctor seem concerned about the weight? If baby is steadily growing in his own growth curve, then I guess I wouldn't worry about it too much, and just let him eat as much as he wants whenever he wants, and continue to nurse too. Nursing into toddlerhood always felt like an insurance policy to me, for those days when LO didn't seem to want to eat much. In time, they develop more of an appitite.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: grazing

    ONE MORE THING: You probably already know this, but I have a friend who didn't know this, so I'll mention it...disregard if you already knew it.

    Remember that your LO needs to remain reclined and rear facing in his car seat up until he reaches 20 pounds AND is over 1 year of age. Some people don't realize that the weight has to be over 20 lbs and have switched the seat around as soon as baby turned one year old.

  4. #4
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    Aug 2006
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    Default Re: grazing

    re weight.. he was born small anyway, at 5lb 14 oz so he should hit the "triple birth weight by 1" guideline.
    re car seat--his legs are long now so we are getting him forward facing at 1. i've heard somewhere that if the feet are touching the backseat, some accidents cause the baby's legs to actually get more damaged because of it.

    re the food--i'm just tired of feeding him round the clock and no results. he still nurses 2x during nighttime, and during the day he probably gets 3-4x. i'm trying to set his meals to coincide with ours, but of course if he quits after two bites i try to sneak in more food for snacks.

    i'm trying to trust him that if he's hungry he'll eat, but it's so tough.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Default Re: grazing

    i'm not a big fan of the 'grazing' concept. it seems to set them up for unhealthy eating habits. the idea of regular meals and even regular snacks seems more effective for the long term. plus, if he has a chance to graze all day he'll never be hungry enough to pay attention to a meals.

    the smaller of my twins is about 14 lbs at 7 months. she is def on the smaller side, but no pressure from the ped to push food. she was 5 14 at birth so is similar in size to yours. how about yogurt? mine love it.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: grazing

    i'm not a big fan of the 'grazing' concept. it seems to set them up for unhealthy eating habits. the idea of regular meals and even regular snacks seems more effective for the long term. plus, if he has a chance to graze all day he'll never be hungry enough to pay attention to a meals.
    IMO, personally, mind you, I don't think the grazing concept sets a child up for unhealthy eating habits, because of a few different reasons.

    #1 It's actually healthier for you to eat 5 or 6 smaller meals per day than to eat 3 large ones. It helps you maintain a healthier body weight, as it keeps you going all day and you don't get so hungry that you overeat, I believe it actually helps regulate your metabolism.

    #2 Different people have different metabolic needs, not just adults, but children too. My oldest son, for instance has a tendency towards low blood sugar. He is a much happier and feels much better if he has smaller meals, and lots of healthy complex carb snacks throughout the day.

    #3 3 large meals a day is actually more of a social concept, and not a metabolic need. In our society here in the US, most of us do eat 3 large meals per day, and its ok if you want your family to have that as well, mealtime is a great social time, but its also important to be open to differences in children. Some kids are burning energy really fast, and a totally scheduled day with regard to snacks and 3 large meals may not work for them, especially if they're underweight and their doctor is concerned about it. Some kids are just light eaters at meals, and actually do better with more healthy snacks in between. What I'm saying is that the routine of Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner isn't wrong, but that all children can't be expected to eat the bulk of their food at those 3 times.

    #4 IMO, personally again, I don't feel its unhealthy to graze. I think an unhealthy eating habit would be if the grazing consisted of cookies and candy and soda, instead of good fruits, cheese, yogurt, and high carb snacks. It does take more work to regulate what snacks are going into your child if they are grazers instead of on a strict 3 meal plan, as you have to alternate snacks and include all the food groups, but IMO, its not unhealthy, and is actually the best thing for a child who seems to do better that way.

    The following is a good description of why 5 to 6 smaller meals per day works for your metabolism, its referencing adults, but as far as I know children's metabolisms work the same way...they just don't often need to lose a few pounds like adults.

    Your body wants and requires good nutrition throughout the day to function optimally, and your body actually senses when it is not receiving adequate nutrition, and will slow its metabolism, to conserve energy, if we go more than a few hours without eating.
    There is plenty of scientific and anecdotal evidence to support this. The key is to eat small, nutritionally sound meals approximately every 3 hours while we are awake. By doing so, this pattern helps maintain a more consistent level of blood glucose throughout the day.

    When we go more than 3-4 hours without eating, blood glucose may drop, resulting in intense feelings of hunger, followed by overeating. This often leads to insulin spikes, which result in rapid storage of excess calories to the fat cells, and the ensuing repetative cycle of overeating and weight gain.

    Frequent, small meals also help to maintain lean muscle mass. This is important because, muscle will be broken down by the body during periods of starvation, and converted to a fuel source in the absence of adequate nutrition. Muscle is your body's fat burning furnace. Toned, stimulated muscle helps keep your metabolism elevated, and encourages a shift in the direction of fat loss. http
    http://www.physiciansway.com/site/in...y070122-122604
    Last edited by Mommie of 2; March 28th, 2007 at 10:46 AM. Reason: I mucked up the link and had to fix it.

  7. #7
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    Jul 2006
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    Default Re: grazing

    Quote Originally Posted by agnes7894 View Post
    re car seat--his legs are long now so we are getting him forward facing at 1. i've heard somewhere that if the feet are touching the backseat, some accidents cause the baby's legs to actually get more damaged because of it.
    Just wanted to chime in on this....

    First a disclaimer, I switched my kids around at the age of one year too. However, rear-facing is actually safer for your child's BRAIN and SPINAL CORD. I just went to a meeting where they had a speaker talk about car seat safety (she's the exec. director of our local Safe Kids campaign). Anyway, she said that even if your kids legs are all cramped up looking, better to have a broken bone than to have a head or spinal cord injury. She mentioned that in Europe, where standards are more strict, kids ride rear-facing until like 4 YEARS OLD!

    Anyway, I'm not telling you what to do, but just wanted to pass along information I got on the rear-facing issue.....

    Lisa

  8. #8
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    Jul 2006
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    Default Re: grazing

    I think grazing is fine. I myself "graze" all day on healthy fruits and veggies I have prepared in the fridge.

    Maybe a booster in the chair might make your lo feel more involved at meal time.

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