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Thread: Getting nervous and would like some advice.

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    20,997

    Default Re: Getting nervous and would like some advice.

    Hi soon2bemomagain! Good for you for thinking about this subject ahead of time. There are a lot of hospital "policies" that don't exist for any good reason other than it's just the way things have always been done, and it's convenient for the staff. Here are some of the things that we did that were different from hospital policy:

    The umbilical cord should be allowed to stop pulsing before it is clamped and cut. The baby gets a bit of extra blood that way.

    The just-born healthy baby should go right up into Mom's arms and warm up skin-to-skin on her bare chest instead of all alone in a baby warmer.

    The baby does not need to be weighed or measured or footprinted immediately after birth- it's not like those stats are going to change in an hour! The new family should be allowed to bond instead.

    Eye-ointment can (and IMHO should) be delayed for an hour at least to allow the baby to experience the outside world with unblurred eyes. There's no decrease in effectiveness of the ointment if it is delayed. Also, adults who've had the eye ointment say it stings, which doesn't sound like a very nice experience for a newborn!

    The baby does not need an immediate bath, or to go to the nursery for any non-medical reason. The baby should be with its parents for as long as they want. No-one should say "I'm taking the baby to the nursery now." Instead, you should always be asked if you want the baby to go to the nursery, and should be given a reason for why the baby would need to go. All routine health checks can be done in the room with the parents present.

    No-one should give the baby a bottle or pacifier, as that can interfere with the budding breastfeeding relationship.

    If you speak to your OB and the hospital staff ahead of time about your wishes, and give everyone a copy of your wishes in writing, they should be more open and flexible about doing what you want. I wish you luck for a good birth, a good stay in the hospital, and a good start to breastfeeding!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: Getting nervous and would like some advice.

    Dr Jack Newman has some very interesting articles that you can read about all this information....I found him very helpful.

    http://www.thebirthden.com/Newman.html

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    3,900

    Default Re: Getting nervous and would like some advice.

    The debate posts on this thread have been moved to Around the Refreshment Table.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    2,539

    Default Re: Getting nervous and would like some advice.

    Congrats soon2bemomagain!!! I wanted to say good for you for getting prepared, it helps to be informed and have a plan. I do want to mention that it is also great to be flexible with that plan in case of emergency (heaven forbid), I have found many mothers who come in with a "set in stone" birth plan end up frustrated and disappointed when things don't go exactly to their original plan-myself included. But on a lighter note, you could go to your OB and your Pedi as well as tour the center that you plan to deliver and ask what their policies are regarding vaccinations/bathing/cord clamping, etc. That way you get a good idea of what the attitude of the center is. From the sounds of what you had posted the place you plan on delivering at is pro BF which is a fantastic start. As some of the PP wrote, do some good old fashioned research and the things that are important to you, let your health care team know. Communication is so important in any form-written, verbal, having someone with you who you feel will back you up if you feel your "team" is not respecting your decisions. Remember the staff is supposed to be there to advocate your wishes, so let them be known, it is really appreciated by most (I know I can't speak for all healthcare workers ). Good luck mommy and many blessings to you and yours!!!!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    3,900

    Default Re: Getting nervous and would like some advice.

    It is suggested that non-emergent newborn procedures be delayed at least until after the first breastfeeding session. Many of these procedures can be done with baby in your arms! There are lots of resources available regarding the topic. One of the most popular (and well respected) is from the AAP.

    The American Academy of Pediatrics' policy statement on breastfeeding and the use of human milk says this (bold mine):
    Item 2
    Peripartum policies and practices that optimize breastfeeding initiation and maintenance should be encouraged.
    Education of both parents before and after delivery of the infant is an essential component of successful breastfeeding. Support and encouragement by the father can greatly assist the mother during the initiation process and during subsequent periods when problems arise. Consistent with appropriate care for the mother, minimize or modify the course of maternal medications that have the potential for altering the infant's alertness and feeding behavior.152,153 Avoid procedures that may interfere with breastfeeding or that may traumatize the infant, including unnecessary, excessive, and overvigorous suctioning of the oral cavity, esophagus, and airways to avoid oropharyngeal mucosal injury that may lead to aversive feeding behavior.154,155
    Item 3
    Healthy infants should be placed and remain in direct skin-to-skin contact with their mothers immediately after delivery until the first feeding is accomplished.156–158
    The alert, healthy newborn infant is capable of latching on to a breast without specific assistance within the first hour after birth.156 Dry the infant, assign Apgar scores, and perform the initial physical assessment while the infant is with the mother. The mother is an optimal heat source for the infant.159,160 Delay weighing, measuring, bathing, needle-sticks, and eye prophylaxis until after the first feeding is completed. Infants affected by maternal medications may require assistance for effective latch-on.156 Except under unusual circumstances, the newborn infant should remain with the mother throughout the recovery period.161
    For the full text of the article, see this page:
    http://aappolicy.aappublications.org...rics;115/2/496

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