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Thread: Dr. Newman suggests not waking baby up every 2-3 hours??

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    343

    Default Re: Dr. Newman suggests not waking baby up every 2-3 hours??

    i HAD to wake my son every couple of hours... he would sleep 5hr stretches during the day and my milk supply got off to a rocky start, so i needed to wake and nurse him way more often... so maybe it depends on you and your baby?
    Stefanie, momma to

    deacon james 09.22.06

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    87

    Default Re: Dr. Newman suggests not waking baby up every 2-3 hours??

    Could you post the links to where he says that please?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Default Re: Dr. Newman suggests not waking baby up every 2-3 hours??

    I was told to wake my son up every 3 hours in the hospital and dutifully did so, he never woke up on his own. I would love to go back and do that again and see if he maybe would have woken up in 3.5 hours, or 4 hours and maybe he would have done some cluster feeding to get those 8-12 sessions in per day. The problem we had was that he wasn't ready to eat yet when I woke him up so the feedings never went very well. After the first week my pedi said not to wake him up and things improved dramatically, and he magically cluster fed along with the longer stretches to get the 8-12 feedings per day. On the other hand, I had major engorgment which is think was partly due to the fact that he was such a lazy nurser early on. Perhaps if he ate more often and took more in I wouldn't have had such a problem?

    Of course now he nurses every two hours (he's 3 mos old) and I can't believe he ever went three hours plus!!!

    Anne- Mom to two active boys: Henry 10/06 and Jamie 4/09


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  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    8,272

    Default Re: Dr. Newman suggests not waking baby up every 2-3 hours??

    At the hospital we started out nursing immediately on then on demand. I have no idea how often that was but our LO was definitely waking up sooner than every 3 hours! The 2nd night in the hospital our LO had elevated biliruben levels (jaundice). The brought a bili-light set up to my hospital room and as part of the treatment to help flush the broken down biliruben waste products out of LOs system told me to nurse every 60 - 90 minutes. It was a long night for everybody but this was very successful in treating LO, and as a good side effect all that nursing I think helped stimulate my milk to come in early. It was pretty cool to see the switch from colustrum to milk about half way through the night. The first couple days home we were waking up LO to feed every 3 hours .... but after the pedi checkup on day 5 or whatever the pedi said our LO had great weight gain and to let him sleep. Oh - and that intense nursing with the jaundice treatment definitely didn't turn our LO off of the breast! At 6 mo he's a champ at nursing.
    Lynn
    DS1: bf 7/2006 -> 4/2009; multiple food allergies
    DS2: bf 9/2009 -> ???
    ; multiple food allergies
    Breastmilk Donor - http://hmbana.org/index/donatemilk
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  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    458

    Default Re: Dr. Newman suggests not waking baby up every 2-3 hours??

    I had to wake up my son to nurse him every 2-2.5 hours during the day and every 3 hours at night. But that was because he a preemie and prone to sleeping through feedings to conserve energy, and was therefore losing weight. We stopped when he hit 7 pounds, which was at about 2.5 weeks of age.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    562

    Default Re: Dr. Newman suggests not waking baby up every 2-3 hours??

    Quote Originally Posted by dee View Post
    The lactation consultant I saw in the hospital said to do it for the first week because of the epidural and painkillers that the majority or American women get that keeps baby drowsy. After that, she said don't worry about it.
    This is interesting. I can't recall seeing any studies that prove this connection between pain meds, sleepy baby, and early breastfeeding struggles, but based on what I hear from IBCLCs working in hospitals and from the mothers posting here, I suspect there often is a correlation.

    Dr. Newman's caution (if in fact he says what nywifey reports; I haven't seen that section of his website) may have more to do with HOW a sleepy baby is woken for nursing. Newborns do not like to have things shoved in their faces (nor do I!). Sometimes mothers are taught to be quite forceful in their efforts to latch on their newborns. Perhaps this is what he is getting at? It would help to have a link to the passage that nywifey is referring to.

  7. #17

    Default Re: Dr. Newman suggests not waking baby up every 2-3 hours??

    Based on this article I'd wake the baby up after at least by hour 3, in the first 6 weeks.
    "Research now shows that restricting the amount of time at the breast and extending the time between feedings can reduce not only a mother's milk supply, but also the fat content of her milk -- resulting in a hungry, crying baby."
    The key word in that passage is "restricting". This is a warning to mothers who try to get their babies to stretch out times between feedings or who might use scheduled feeding as outlined in many popular (but not breastfeeding-friendly) programs out there, and ignore baby's feeding cues in the process. I too would like to see the article that the OP referenced, but I'm sure Dr Newman recommends feeding the baby on-demand and allowing the baby unrestricted access to the breast.

    The point about in-labor meds and postpartum meds making the baby sleepy is a good point.

    The bottom line is this (and I should have made this clearer in my previous post): Baby needs to be going to the breast 8-12 times per 24 hours. This does not necessarily translate out to every 2-3 hours. Some babies will nurse every hour for several hours and sleep a longer stretch at another time of day. IF you find you are having trouble getting baby to come to the breast for AT LEAST 8 feedings or if you are having weight gain issues, then it's time to start looking at waking the baby to feed. Definitely, some newborns are very sleepy and do need a little encouragement to feed.

    OP can you post a link to the article you were asking about?
    Hugs
    Jen
    "Mothers are designed to be available to their babies--to help them make the transition into this big, wide world. To teach them to trust, and love, and feel good about being alive."
    --Elizabeth N. Baldwin, Esq., So I Nursed Him Every 45 Minutes

    Click here to find your local LLL Group
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  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    66

    Default Re: Dr. Newman suggests not waking baby up every 2-3 hours??

    I found this info on the BFAR site:

    • Two weeks is the average length of time to calibrate the breasts’ standard rate of milk production (per researcher Woolridge) - the most important thing a woman can do is remove the absolute most amount of milk in those first two weeks. During that time prolactin and oxytocin receptors are being established which dictate how efficient the body will be in using the prolactin and oxcytocin it receives. Milk supply is mostly set in the first 2 weeks, although it can be increased thereafter. (here, “milk supply” relates to milk ejection, not receptors or milk production capacity).

    from:Making More Milk: A Nursing Mother’s Guide to Milk Supply By Diana West, BA, IBCLC, and Lisa Marasco, MA, IBCLC.

    With that in mind, I think I would wake my LO every 2 hours to nurse during those first 2 weeks to establish your supply.

  9. #19

    Default Re: Dr. Newman suggests not waking baby up every 2-3 hours??

    I found this info on the BFAR site:

    • Two weeks is the average length of time to calibrate the breasts’ standard rate of milk production (per researcher Woolridge) - the most important thing a woman can do is remove the absolute most amount of milk in those first two weeks. During that time prolactin and oxytocin receptors are being established which dictate how efficient the body will be in using the prolactin and oxcytocin it receives. Milk supply is mostly set in the first 2 weeks, although it can be increased thereafter. (here, “milk supply” relates to milk ejection, not receptors or milk production capacity).

    from:Making More Milk: A Nursing Mother’s Guide to Milk Supply By Diana West, BA, IBCLC, and Lisa Marasco, MA, IBCLC.

    With that in mind, I think I would wake my LO every 2 hours to nurse during those first 2 weeks to establish your supply.

    That info is for women breastfeeding after a reduction (BFAR). In this case, some of those women may have a physiological disadvantage from the get-go because some of their milk ducts may have been damaged or removed by the surgery. In their case removal of as much milk as possible is important. However the average nursing mother only needs to remove as much as her baby needs. To remove more can lead to problems like engorgement, over-active letdown and oversupply issues.

    *Feed the baby on cue
    *Make sure baby is eating at least 8-12 times or more every 24 hours
    *Watch the wet and dirty diaper output--this will tell you more than anything else whether or not your baby is getting enough to eat each day.
    *IF baby is not coming to the breast enough, or IF diaper output is low or IF there are weight gain issues, THEN is the time to start looking at waking the baby.

    Jen

    P.S. Liebchen, I see from some of your other posts that you have implants. So the BFAR information might very well apply to you. I just wanted to make it clear for those who had NOT had prior breast surgery.
    Last edited by LLL LactoJen; January 26th, 2007 at 03:07 PM.
    "Mothers are designed to be available to their babies--to help them make the transition into this big, wide world. To teach them to trust, and love, and feel good about being alive."
    --Elizabeth N. Baldwin, Esq., So I Nursed Him Every 45 Minutes

    Click here to find your local LLL Group
    How to tell if your breastfed baby is getting enough milk!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    66

    Default Re: Dr. Newman suggests not waking baby up every 2-3 hours??

    Quote Originally Posted by LLL LactoJen View Post
    That info is for women breastfeeding after a reduction (BFAR). In this case, some of those women may have a physiological disadvantage from the get-go because some of their milk ducts may have been damaged or removed by the surgery. In their case removal of as much milk as possible is important. However the average nursing mother only needs to remove as much as her baby needs. To remove more can lead to problems like engorgement, over-active letdown and oversupply issu

    P.S. Liebchen, I see from some of your other posts that you have implants. So the BFAR information might very well apply to you. I just wanted to make it clear for those who had NOT had prior breast surgery.
    No problem! Thanks for the clarification--I'm still learning, so every bit of info helps!

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