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Thread: Getting ready for extended breastfeeding...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Question Getting ready for extended breastfeeding...

    Well, my amazing daughter will be 1 in February! We are still breastfeeding strong! Anyway, I have a few questions....

    Background: I work 2 nights a week (7p-7a) and I don't pump enough some nights so she does get probably 8-12 ounces of formula a week. Other than that she gets expresed breastmilk from Daddy and she eats about 3 meals a day.

    1) How can I prepare for the people that are going to give me a hard time about breastfeeding beyond a year? I am already getting the questions: "Aren't you done yet?" / "That just doesn't look right!" (Ok, thats not a question!)

    2) You are supposed to start whole milk at 1 year, how would we go about doing this? She eats a good breakfast and dinner but isn't a big lunch kid. Should my husband give her milk in place of formula at night? Should I replace one BF for milk?

    3) Is she BF too much? When I'm home she is still breast feeding right after waking up, after breaskfast, before nap, after lunch, before 2nd nap, before (or) after dinner, before bedtime, and usually once during the night. Usually this is only off of one side. Is she breastfeeding too much? That is 8 times in one day! Should I start cuttin back on some of this?

    I am going to let her lead the way with our breasfeeding relationship, but I want to do the best for her also!

    Thank you in advance for any information you can provide!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    31

    Default Re: Getting ready for extended breastfeeding...

    If she is happy with BM and so are you then you just carry on. Here is some info:
    Although there has been little research done on children who breastfeed beyond the age of two, the available information indicates that breastfeeding continues to be a valuable source of nutrition and disease protection for as long as breastfeeding continues.
    "Human milk expressed by mothers who have been lactating for >1 year has significantly increased fat and energy contents, compared with milk expressed by women who have been lactating for shorter periods. During prolonged lactation, the fat energy contribution of breast milk to the infant diet might be significant."
    -- Mandel 2005
    "Breast milk continues to provide substantial amounts of key nutrients well beyond the first year of life, especially protein, fat, and most vitamins."
    -- Dewey 2001
    In the second year (12-23 months), 448 mL of breastmilk provides:
    29% of energy requirements
    43% of protein requirements
    36% of calcium requirements
    75% of vitamin A requirements
    76% of folate requirements
    94% of vitamin B12 requirements
    60% of vitamin C requirements
    -- Dewey 2001
    Studies done in rural Bangladesh have shown that breastmilk continues to be an important source of vitamin A in the second and third year of life.
    -- Persson 1998
    It's not uncommon for weaning to be recommended for toddlers who are eating few solids. However, this recommendation is not supported by research. According to Sally Kneidel in "Nursing Beyond One Year" (New Beginnings, Vol. 6 No. 4, July-August 1990, pp. 99-103.):
    Some doctors may feel that nursing will interfere with a child's appetite for other foods. Yet there has been no documentation that nursing children are more likely than weaned children to refuse supplementary foods. In fact, most researchers in Third World countries, where a malnourished toddler's appetite may be of critical importance, recommend continued nursing for even the severely malnourished (Briend et al, 1988; Rhode, 1988; Shattock and Stephens, 1975; Whitehead, 1985). Most suggest helping the malnourished older nursing child not by weaning but by supplementing the mother's diet to improve the nutritional quality of her milk (Ahn and MacLean. 1980; Jelliffe and Jelliffe, 1978) and by offering the child more varied and more palatable foods to improve his or her appetite (Rohde, 1988; Tangermann, 1988; Underwood, 1985).
    The American Academy of Family Physicians notes that children weaned before two years of age are at increased risk of illness (AAFP 2001).
    Nursing toddlers between the ages of 16 and 30 months have been found to have fewer illnesses and illnesses of shorter duration than their non-nursing peers (Gulick 1986).
    "Antibodies are abundant in human milk throughout lactation"
    The amount she is feeding is normal just ignore any comments you get and cite the WHO and UNICEF who recommend a MINIMUM of 2 years feeding ( and we wouldn't want our lo's just to have the minimum would we! lol)
    Best wishes
    Amanda

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    1,064

    Default Re: Getting ready for extended breastfeeding...

    There's no such thing as nursing too much! It's fine to keep following your daughter's lead. Also, while it is OK to introduce whole cow's milk at one year, that doesn't mean it is a necessity. A child who is getting a substantial amount of breastmilk doesn't *need* dairy. If you'd like to introduce some whole milk, I'd definitely replace the formula rather than the breastmilk. Your other option would be to replace formula with other solid foods and water for a beverage.

    While it is fine to keep nursing on demand, many mothers do decide to start limiting nursing at some point during toddlerhood. That is ok, too. It's really up to you and your daughter.

    One way to combat the nay-sayers is with information (like the PP listed). You can point out that the World Health Organization recommends breastfeeding until at least age 2. You can also say that her doctor recommends continuing (even if the doctor doesn't actually say this you can just make it up--that sometimes quiets arguments from outsiders). Otherwise you can just stop talking about it with people who aren't supportive. People who don't actually see you nurse or pump will just assume she's weaned anyway.

    Congratulations on making it near the one year mark, and happy extended nursing!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Default Re: Getting ready for extended breastfeeding...

    Should my husband also offer Milk at meal times when I am not home? She already drinks water or apple juice/water (when constipated) at meal times, adding whole milk to that could eliminate formula all together.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Default Re: Getting ready for extended breastfeeding...

    my bb Sean will be 1 next 16 Feb. I too will extend bf and exclusive bf only. My pead suggest FM as bm less nutrition she claimed. Nonsence!!

    I dont think you gal is bf too much.

  6. #6
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    Oct 2006
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    Default Re: Getting ready for extended breastfeeding...

    What am I?? Chopped Liver?

    Ha! I guess I need to find a busier board!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Default Re: Getting ready for extended breastfeeding...

    Congratulations on reaching the one-year mark soon!

    Quote Originally Posted by rik8144 View Post
    Should my husband also offer Milk at meal times when I am not home? She already drinks water or apple juice/water (when constipated) at meal times, adding whole milk to that could eliminate formula all together.
    It's really up to you to decide, with your healthcare provider.

    Here's some articles on Extended Breastfeeding. There are topics on the benefits of nursing past one year, as well as handling criticism.

    HTH,
    Mary
    Last edited by @llli*LLLMaryP; January 26th, 2007 at 11:36 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    7

    Default Re: Getting ready for extended breastfeeding...

    I could have written this post LMAO... Antonia will be 1 year in ONE WEEK (where does the time go) UNFORTUNATELY in the past month my supply has taken a hit and I've had to supplement at least 1 bottle, sometimes 2 a day with formula, it killed me to do it, but she HAD to eat

    SO as we get closer to the one year mark, I'm wondering where do I go? Should I replace the formula feedings with milk? I plan on still BFing her as often as we can... minimum of waking in the AM and before bed. I'm not sure how my supply will do with this... but being a f/t working mom I am looking forward to stopping pumping! Will I most likely be able to eliminate daytime pumping sessions and keep her BFed?

    Do I just let her lead... BF her as much as she wants when I'm around? I do not offer her juice, nor will I! BUT I want to make sure she doesn't consume too much milk... is this really possible? I think I'm rambling... ANY advice is appreciated.

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