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Thread: spitting

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    183

    Default spitting

    My LO tends to spit much more when the breastfeed compared to when she takes a bottle of EBM. Her dad sees this as a reason to stop breastfeeding, but I don't want to. Any ideas? I read that I should keep her straight during the breastfeeding sessions, but how do I do this? Thanks !

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,064

    Default Re: spitting

    Spitting up is usually more of a laundry problem than anything else--certainly no reason to stop BF. It could be that you have a very fast flow, which could cause her to gulp a lot of milk quickly. You can try leaning back a bit while you nurse (like in a comfortable chair or reclining) so that the milk is flowing a bit "uphill". You can also try to position baby so that she is more parallel with your body (i.e. kind of lying vertically in you) rather than horizontal across your abdomen. HTH!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    863

    Default Re: spitting

    You love your little one and want to continue to offer her the best nutrition around! Your husbands comments hurt and disappointed you as well, I"m sure.
    It sounds like you want to find a solution to both of these issues.

    Spitting up is considered within the normal range of infant behavior. You didn't mention how old your lo is, but the frequency of spitting up typically peaks at about 4 months. As long as your baby is gaining well and has enough wet/ poopie diapers, you can feel confident that enough milk is staying down for the baby to grow and thrive.

    Babies spit up for many reasons and sometimes the reason can't be determined (and they simply out grow it! ). We can rule out some of the reasons babies spit up (eg, a medication you're taking) because you've already stated that your lo drinks your EBM just fine! This is a good sign! Other causes include a strong let down reflex, a strong gag reflex, and immature muscle control, and consuming too much milk at one feeding. Do you have any instincts about whether any of these might relate to you and your lo? Aside from the spit up, are you concerned about any other feeding patterns with your lo? Does your baby choke or gulp after your let down?

    While we are figuring this out, I want to offer you the following suggestion from the Breastfeeding Answer Book: "...try gentle handling and keeping the baby upright after feedings [many moms find slings useful for this]."


    Your husband's suggestion to stop bf upset you. LLL believes breastfeeding is enhanced and the nursing couple sustained by the loving support, help, and companionship of the baby’s father. It's very common for dad to feel left out when a new family member comes in to the picture. Many dads blame breastfeeding for his feelings of displacement. To make matters worse, they can't even count on the natural assistance of hormones that aid the mother to help them cope with this big change. The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding states, "A father who is hesitant can only begin to support your decision to nurse the baby if he understands what it means to you." Many moms find that a well timed heart to heart with dad about his concerns and feelings regarding bf and the family can go a long way. He needs you to hear him so naming what you are hearing as his concerns can help with that. If he is concerned about bonding, he can be reassured that there is plenty for dad to do besides feed the baby (bathing, changing, walking, comforting) and plenty he can do to support the bf relationship between you and your lo (getting you a glass of water, warding off critical friends and family, bringing you snacks...). It is beautiful to see how some fathers really become the cheerleaders, supporters, and guardians of their nursing couple.

    Ultimately, though, the bf relationship is between mother and child. Many moms bf, and continue to bf for quite some time, without the support of the baby's father. Those moms find their strength and support elsewhere (and within!), including places like LLL meetings.

    I'll be going to bed soon, but I'll check back for a response in the morning!
    Last edited by LLL_Kristie; January 14th, 2007 at 09:39 PM.
    Kristie L.
    LLL Leader
    (the poster formerly known as fezzik812)
    Wife to Brett, Mommy to Seamus (5.1.05), and Emelie (1.18.08)
    "You must be the change you wish to see in the world."- Ghandi

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    183

    Default Re: spitting

    Thank you for your advices. They are comforting.....

    My LO is 3.5 month, so I guess reaching soon the peak of spitting !!! She is gaining weight nicely, and I had her check for reflux. Nothing of concern. So, yes, it is more a laundry problem.... and a time management issue. How many time did I have to change clothes just before leaving the house for work !!!

    My husband has been pretty supportive of me breastfeeding... but I think he is to a point where he thinks 3-4 months should be enough. He has 2 other kids (I am not the mom) who were never breastfed, and I know he thinks they are healthy, so what!! Plus, we have been giving one bottle a day since she is 1 month old... for him to participate to the feeding.... and there is much less spitting then.

    When I started BF, my goal was... a week, then a month, then 3 months... and now 6 month (if I can pump - find time to pump - enough at work).

    I don't know if I have a fast let down. Never really felt it.... but maybe so. I'll try to make more of a vertical flow, and see what happens.

    Thanks again....

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,987

    Default Re: spitting

    My son also spit up a lot and it gradually went away. Maybe you could gradually educate your husband about the benefits of breastfeeding. Here's a site that lists a lot of them. http://www.askdrsears.com/html/2/T020100.asp

    This other site looks ahead to the benefits of nursing beyond a year which might help both of you look ahead.
    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/bfextended/ebf-benefits.html

    One thing that my husband especially enjoys is the economic benefits of bfing. Not only is it free to feed and you don't have to spend money on formula, but bf babies tend to be healthier. That means less missed work b/c of a sick baby and fewer dr. bills. My husband has always been supportive of bfing, but over the past year he has almost become a lactivist himself as he has become more educated and seen how our son is thriving.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    863

    Default Re: spitting

    It does sound like just a laundry problem for now. Here is a non LLL webpage that shows some great positions for keeping spit up to a minimum.

    You should be so proud of your self for meeting each goal you set! Keep it up, Mama! That is exactly how many moms make it to a year- step by step. This is a great article that has more tips on nursing to a year.

    As you prepare to return to work you may find the LLL Pumping Forum helpful. You expressed some concern over finding time to pump at work. Some moms find it helpful to have a regular pumping schedule so that they can work meetings around it and also allow their bodies to "expect" the pumping session.

    It is wonderful that your hubby has supported bf to this point. Has he given any specific reasons (besides spit up) as to why he would like you to stop now?
    Last edited by LLL_Kristie; January 15th, 2007 at 07:32 PM.
    Kristie L.
    LLL Leader
    (the poster formerly known as fezzik812)
    Wife to Brett, Mommy to Seamus (5.1.05), and Emelie (1.18.08)
    "You must be the change you wish to see in the world."- Ghandi

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