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Thread: Should I keep baby in the room while in hosptial?

  1. #11
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    Jul 2006
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    Default Re: Should I keep baby in the room while in hosptial?

    -
    Last edited by eener; January 8th, 2007 at 11:44 AM.

  2. #12
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    Jul 2006
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    Default Re: Should I keep baby in the room while in hosptial?

    When I gave birth to my son last January, I wasn't given the option. After giving birth, they helped me into a wheelchair, placed the baby in my arms and rolled us together, from the delivery room to our hospital room.

    In the city and province where I live, the nursery is only used in special circumstances and they prefer you to keep the baby in your room for bonding. They also believe it's important to fully assume your role as mom to your new baby, while you are surrounded by help and support of the nursing staff. Then it's not such a shock when you take the baby home. Whenever you need help with the baby you just press the call button.

    The nurses were great where I delivered. They strongly encouraged breastfeeding and because it was my first baby, they asked me to press the call button each time I nursed. They helped me and the baby get a good latch, watched and documented the feeding sessions, and gave us a report of "breastfeeding successful" upon leaving. I gained many tips as well about nipple care and keeping my son awake when he would doze off while nursing.

  3. #13
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    Aug 2006
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    Default Re: Should I keep baby in the room while in hosptial?

    I really enjoyed rooming in with my newborns. Actually, the nurses took my DS to the nursery for about 3 hours that first night, but he was with us in our room after that. My DH stayed in the hospital with us for both babies, so that was helpful.
    I really felt it helped us get to know each other better and helped me learn their cues right away. And, even though I gave birth at very BF-friendly hospitals, I had the comfort of knowing that nobody was doing anything against my wishes in the nursery. You can always call a nurse to the room if you need some help.
    Obviously, you know your situation best, and if you have a difficult recovery you might want to have baby go to the nursery for a bit. I would suggest trying to avoid that if you can, and instead having someone stay with you and help out, and call a nurse to the room when you need one. That's just what I would do.
    I agree that family and friends are wonderful, but limiting visitors in some manner is important or you won't get any rest.

    Molly

    Loving mama to JP (DS, 1/03 ~ nursed 6 mos), EL (DD1, 9/05 ~ nursed 4 yrs), EJ (DD2, 3/08 ~ nursed 3 yrs 9 mos), and
    JM (DD3, 6/12 ~ currently nursing), all born naturally
    Devoted wife to SAHD P, my hero
    A few of my favorite things that I've discovered on the forum: co-sleeping, baby-wearing, tandem nursing, baby-led solids, cloth diapering, APing, selective vaccination...the list goes on

  4. #14
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    Jul 2006
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    779

    Default Re: Should I keep baby in the room while in hosptial?

    Thanks for all your feedback! Very helpful
    Mom to Colin Robert - Born on January 28, 2007

    Check out my website:
    www.nycbreastfeeding.com

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    863

    Default Re: Should I keep baby in the room while in hosptial?

    Hello! The time when you will meet your lo is on the horizon! Your worried about getting enough rest with your new baby, but look forward to bonding immediately. Many moms enjoy rooming in because they find they are able to relax more with their baby close by. They often feel very strongly about being near their little one and "not right" when the baby is taken away. LLL recommends rooming in with your baby, if medically possible. "Problems caused by hospital routines can often be avoided if it is possible for you to room in with your baby." (The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding, p. 61)

    One of the main concepts of the LLL philosophy is that mother and baby need to be together early and often to establish an adequate milk supply. Dr Sears says in the article I offer below, "Mother has fewer breastfeeding problems. Her milk appears sooner, and baby seems more satisfied."

    When you room with your baby, you are able to begin to observe and learn about your baby's cues. You can respond to your baby and have the hospital staff take care of YOU rather than your baby (other than medically related checks). This will give you a head start for when you go home and don't have the support of hospital staff.

    Here is what Dr. Sears has to say about bonding with your newborn:http://askdrsears.com/html/10/t101100.asp. At the bottom of the article you will see where he addresses rooming in vs. nursery care. Please note the he debunks the myth about the mother getting more rest with nursery care. "A rooming-in mother usually gets more rest. She experiences less separation anxiety, not wasting energy worrying about her newborn in the nursery, and in the first few days newborns sleep most of the time anyway. It's a myth that mothers of nursery-reared babies get more rest"

    I hope you are feeling well. Pretty soon that little one will be in your arms!
    Kristie L.
    LLL Leader
    (the poster formerly known as fezzik812)
    Wife to Brett, Mommy to Seamus (5.1.05), and Emelie (1.18.08)
    "You must be the change you wish to see in the world."- Ghandi

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    751

    Default Re: Should I keep baby in the room while in hosptial?

    I would suggest keeping the baby with you. I kept DD with me as much as possible. When they made her go to the nursey, I had DH go with me. But - do what is best for you and try to get some rest. You will need it for once you go home.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    8,591

    Default Re: Should I keep baby in the room while in hosptial?

    Quote Originally Posted by LLL_Kristie View Post
    Hello! The time when you will meet your lo is on the horizon! Your worried about getting enough rest with your new baby, but look forward to bonding immediately. Many moms enjoy rooming in because they find they are able to relax more with their baby close by. They often feel very strongly about being near their little one and "not right" when the baby is taken away. LLL recommends rooming in with your baby, if medically possible. "Problems caused by hospital routines can often be avoided if it is possible for you to room in with your baby." (The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding, p. 61)

    One of the main concepts of the LLL philosophy is that mother and baby need to be together early and often to establish an adequate milk supply. Dr Sears says in the article I offer below, "Mother has fewer breastfeeding problems. Her milk appears sooner, and baby seems more satisfied."

    When you room with your baby, you are able to begin to observe and learn about your baby's cues. You can respond to your baby and have the hospital staff take care of YOU rather than your baby (other than medically related checks). This will give you a head start for when you go home and don't have the support of hospital staff.

    Here is what Dr. Sears has to say about bonding with your newborn:http://askdrsears.com/html/10/t101100.asp. At the bottom of the article you will see where he addresses rooming in vs. nursery care. Please note the he debunks the myth about the mother getting more rest with nursery care. "A rooming-in mother usually gets more rest. She experiences less separation anxiety, not wasting energy worrying about her newborn in the nursery, and in the first few days newborns sleep most of the time anyway. It's a myth that mothers of nursery-reared babies get more rest"

    I hope you are feeling well. Pretty soon that little one will be in your arms!
    Kristie...thanks for your very well thought out response. I agree with LLL in most circumstances here, and in general with Dr. Sears. I had a very different experience though...I had been in labor for over 2 weeks and was exhausted when the surgery was finally scheduled. My husband and I both needed the rest the first night, and while I really wanted to room in with her, for all the obvious reasons, I got more rest knowing that the nursery nurse would be watching her, rockingher and comforting her for those few hours in teh middle of the night, the first night. But again, I had a very different hospital...it was one nurse per baby that night and she was sweet and very pro-bfing. I got far more rest than if I had had to stir at every movement of my dd that night...she is a stirrer while sleeping. I just wanted to point out that it isn't wrong and that it may not affect your bfing relationship (although I guess one could say that's what got us off on the wrong foot, but I would disagree). My milk came in less than 48 hours after dd's birth, Haylee was so satisfied she could hardly keep her eyes open long enough to nurse for 15 minutes at a time the next day, and we are still nursing 13 months later. Again, I will reiterate...it may be something you have to decide spur of the moment, and don't feel guilty if you choose to let the nurses take the baby to the nursery for a few hours to get some rest.

    Erin
    Wife to a grizzly
    Mama to my little deer (12/05) my loving bear cub (9/07--), and our little tiger (3/22/10)
    Born by one c-section and 2 amazing VBACs


    Miles in 2012: 350.5/900 (Actual Miles Ran: 189)
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    227.5 miles on my new shoes
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  8. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    1,987

    Default Re: Should I keep baby in the room while in hosptial?

    I had my son naturally with no medications and I was on such a high for the 12-18 hours after I gave birth that I didn't sleep until later the next morning(he was born a 5 p.m.) and didn't feel any pain. I just wanted to keep reliving the experience. I definitely wanted my son with me at all times, but we had some problems with low body temp. and low blood sugar so he was in the nursery for a while against our wishes. The second night either my husband or I held or had him right beside us all night while we napped and it worked out well.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    799

    Default Re: Should I keep baby in the room while in hosptial?

    Weeks before DS was born I threatened (ha ha )my husband to not take his eye off him after his birth. I didn't want any mix ups. Shortly after surgery I was brought to my room from recovery. The baby was brought to me right away. The nurses at the hospital were simply great. Immediately helping me with nursing and baby. I had one nurse who gave me the extra little push to not give up on the breastfeeding. I loved having the baby right next to me and like the pps said by the time you go home you feel more comfortable with everything. My bed was right next to DS so I could just stare at him as much as I wanted. My hubby was there to help the entire time and this was great because I was a little out of it due to the surgery and drugs. For me I would not have it any other way but to have that little guy right next to me if I have the choice. Everyone is different and situations are different so you have to do what is best for you. In the past I have always disliked hospitals but luckily I had such a great experience. I loved my Dr (she's like a best friend), nurses were super and would have liked to stay another day if I could have! I would not hesitate to do it again. My DH would faint if he heard me say that.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    863

    Default Re: Should I keep baby in the room while in hosptial?

    Quote Originally Posted by epbrown View Post
    Kristie...thanks for your very well thought out response. I agree with LLL in most circumstances here, and in general with Dr. Sears. I had a very different experience though...I had been in labor for over 2 weeks and was exhausted when the surgery was finally scheduled. My husband and I both needed the rest the first night, and while I really wanted to room in with her, for all the obvious reasons, I got more rest knowing that the nursery nurse would be watching her, rockingher and comforting her for those few hours in teh middle of the night, the first night. But again, I had a very different hospital...it was one nurse per baby that night and she was sweet and very pro-bfing. I got far more rest than if I had had to stir at every movement of my dd that night...she is a stirrer while sleeping. I just wanted to point out that it isn't wrong and that it may not affect your bfing relationship (although I guess one could say that's what got us off on the wrong foot, but I would disagree). My milk came in less than 48 hours after dd's birth, Haylee was so satisfied she could hardly keep her eyes open long enough to nurse for 15 minutes at a time the next day, and we are still nursing 13 months later. Again, I will reiterate...it may be something you have to decide spur of the moment, and don't feel guilty if you choose to let the nurses take the baby to the nursery for a few hours to get some rest.
    Wow! It sounds like you had a ROUGH experience with labor! You are fortunate you were able to trust the hospital staff (it sounds like they were great and probably loved having those two little babies!). You made the decision you felt was best for your family at the time, and you are right to not feel guilty about it.

    Every mom's experience is different. Every family dynamic is different. As always, LLL is here to support the mother in her bf choices. There are certain concepts to the core philosophy. They are there to act as a general guide to meet LLL's mission: "Help mothers successfully breastfeed their babies and so successfully mother them." You can learn more about the LLL philosophy here http://www.llli.org/NB/NBMarApr97p36.html. Just as in our local meetings, you can take what works for you and leave the rest.
    Last edited by LLL_Kristie; January 8th, 2007 at 09:01 PM.
    Kristie L.
    LLL Leader
    (the poster formerly known as fezzik812)
    Wife to Brett, Mommy to Seamus (5.1.05), and Emelie (1.18.08)
    "You must be the change you wish to see in the world."- Ghandi

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