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Thread: Pumping for baby that does not nurse awake

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
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    40

    Default Pumping for baby that does not nurse awake

    I already posted this question but at the wrong section of forum. My apologies.
    I need advice how much I need to pump and what amount for my baby that is reaching 6m in two weeks.
    Our situation is sad one. I had plenty of milk and baby was gaining very very well at the beginning. But somehow (that is for separated post) our nursing relationship deteriotated to the point that he will nurse only in sleep. And last few days he is not sleeping so much and I can feel my supply dropping down. I used to pump between 2-4 times per day to get 200-300 mL for him to give him some milk while awake.
    Yesterday he hardly nursed and I pumped only 570 mL.
    I do not think I can devote all my time to pumping. And I guess formula is waiting for us. But is there a way to keep at least some amount of milk for him until he reaches 1y without having pumping 8 times per day? I have also 3y old toddler. And this whole situation with junior not wanting to nurse hit us all so hard on so many ways.
    All infos that I have found until now are mostly realtive for exclusive pumping. And I hope he will at least continue to nurse in his sleep. So how to combine pumping with sporadic nursing?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    10,743

    Default Re: Pumping for baby that does not nurse awake

    Assuming baby is not nursing at all, if your milk production is currently where it needs to be, you might be fine pumping about 6 times a day. If you need to increase your production, you might need to pump 8 times until it increases to the level you want. Obviously these are general numbers, some moms need to pump more often and some do fine with less. But anything under 6 times a day would mimic the pattern of a weaning child, so that would tend to tell the body to reduce milk production.

    Since baby is 6 months old, depending on how much baby eats in solids, you might find baby starts needing less milk each day. Also, you can only do what you can do. If you pump 3 times a day, you are going to make more milk for longer than if you do not pump at all. So if your goal is to provide your milk for your baby as long as possible, remember it does not need to be all or nothing.

    Also, maybe it will help you to think about finding time to pump "extra" when you can, and accept there are days you cannot pump as much as you planned.

    An excellent book on the subject of milk production that has lots of great real life tips for managing pumping is Making More Milk.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
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    40

    Default Re: Pumping for baby that does not nurse awake

    Thank you for reply and some clarifications.
    I am a bit confused how introduction of solids relates to milk intake. Obviously, if baby is eating great amount of solids, milk intake reduces. But most babies eat small or moderate amounts of solids. So, how exactly do I know how much milk my baby needs?
    Sorry if this quesion sounds stupid, but if I do not have baby that is asking for nursing by himself, I really wonder what is average/minimum amount of milk baby needs between first 6m and 12m. I was told by doctor that after 12m it is 400mL of milk (WHO recommendations). Although I think that recommendation was aimed at intake of cows milk.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    10,743

    Default Re: Pumping for baby that does not nurse awake

    This article https://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/pumping/milkcalc/ includes an overview of what existing research suggests about intake both before and after 6 months (start of solids) including how solids intake might impact how much a child needs. A baby only needs so much, so if they are eating any solids it is possible that their breastmilk intake will reduce at least by that amount. This is why typical breastfeeding mothers are cautioned to nurse before giving baby solid meals, and to not put solids (like rice cereal) into bottles or to overfeed with purees on a spoon, because food taken that way is likely to impact how much a baby nurses and cause slow gain in baby and low production in mom. Your situation is atypical, so you might be looking at encouraging more solids, assuming they are solids with a high amount of the fat baby would be getting in breastmilk.

    When looking at the article, remember that the averages are just that- the average among many children studied, not an absolute number each baby needs. Also, intake for an individual baby goes up and down day to day. There is no definitive number of ounces of food a particular baby needs every day in order to gain within normal parameters. The variation is pretty large.

    WHO recommendations - this publication is a little old but I do not see anything more recent on this particular subject on the WHO website. It is a little more complicated than "after 12 months child needs 400mL per day") as how much milk is suggested depends on what else the child is eating. Also WHO recognizes some people are not going to eat dairy products and suggests alternatives. http://www.who.int/nutrition/publica..._CAH_04.13/en/

    That one was about children being fed breast milk alternatives. This one is for breastfed baby being introduced to other foods : http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/...ry_feeding/en/

    Remember WHO guidelines are meant to be read by health care providers, nutritionists, and parents all over the world, including places where serious, life altering malnutrition is common in large parts of the population, and of course by people from many cultures with many disparate child care/ child feeding traditions and beliefs. So sometimes the recommendations are overly rigid and other times quite vague. In other words they are open to some interpretation based on your family's situation and health/nutrition concerns.
    Last edited by @llli*maddieb; October 28th, 2017 at 02:14 PM.

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