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Thread: Mucus in stool?

  1. #1

    Default Mucus in stool?

    Hello to all moms over here, I have questions for you. I have been breastfeeding my daughter for 2 months now and few days ago I noticed that her poop was not like before, it was yellowish. We went straight to doctor and she said it's mucus and that we should not be worried about it, but to stop breastfeeding her just in case. We are going again in few days to see how it's going but she is still pooping something yellowish and it's runny. Did anybody experienced the same mucus in stool problem with their babies?
    Last edited by @llli*sophiewalter; August 22nd, 2017 at 05:19 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    10,754

    Default Re: Mucus in stool?

    Oh help me. Why did the doctor tell you to do the extremely serious intervention of no longer nursing your child if (as is correct) the mucous is nothing to worry about? What is wrong with these doctors????

    Ok, first to clarify- yellow is the color of most baby poop and all poop has mucous in it and is "runny." But I guess you are seeing something outside the norm for your baby?

    Mucous occurs naturally in the body and is required for the digestive system to work. When you or anyone one else poops, there is some mucous. You just do not usually see it. An infant who is pooping frequently and the poop is going into a diaper may have more visible mucous just because the poop is so much more visible in that circumstance. Has there been any other changes in the poop- how often, how much, consistency?

    A child who has more mucous than normal may have some kind of inflammation going on, a cold, tummy virus...many possibilities. Another cause in breastfed babies is if mom has overproduction and/or baby is not nursing with normal (high) frequency. Please note even if this is the reason, it is not a reason to stop nursing! Or it could just be a temporary entirely normal thing that goes away as mysteriously as it came.

    Extra mucous is formed to protect the child's system from whatever might be trying to invade the system or causing inflammation. In other words, the mucous itself is usually all the "treatment" your baby needs. It is not harming baby, and if otherwise baby is healthy and gaining normally, there is probably nothing needed to be done by you or doctor. You can let nature handle it. One thing for sure, your baby being breastfed is the healthiest and only biologically normal way to feed a baby, not a pathology, and should not be discontinued because of mucous or anything else runny or yellow in the stool!

    Did you stop breastfeeding? Is baby being formula fed now? If so, I would strongly suggest start nursing your baby again before your breastfeeding relationship is destroyed and both your health and your baby's health potentially harmed by this entirely ridiculous intervention ordered by a doctor who is either uninformed or breastfeeding-hostile. And get a second opinion from a different doctor. In the unlikely event there is some actual problem that is being evidenced by the mucous, that can be identified and corrected while continuing to nurse your child.

    If you want to stick with this doctor, call the doctor TODAY and tell them that the intervention of taking away your milk and giving your baby formula did nothing to stop the mucous. Hopefully they were just doing it as a "test" (Of what, I have no clue but this happens sometimes) and will say that in that case, of course you should start nursing your child again immediately as obviously the problem does not lie in your milk. If that is not what they say, press them on exactly what they think the problem could possibly be that necessitates taking away your child's biologically normal food and giving them a replacement food, as well as robbing them of the comfort of nursing at the breast.
    Last edited by @llli*maddieb; July 19th, 2017 at 09:39 AM.

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