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Thread: Burping breastfed baby

  1. #11
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    Default Re: Burping breastfed baby

    While feeding, sometimes she coughs and adjusts her throat a lot. Seems like she has some discomfort doing that. What could the reason be?
    sometimes after a while after feeding she makes gagging in the mouth type actions , but nothing happens/comes out

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Burping breastfed baby

    Most commonly, those are signs that the milk flow is a little fast for baby.
    Things that help with fast letdown- try leaning back position (baby kind of on top) to nurse, encourage baby to nurse more often, (usually very helpful.) Or, you can try taking baby off when baby does this and let milk flow into a cloth for a few moments then put baby back on, and/or express a little milk before baby nurses.
    You also can just let baby figure it out. It depends how much it is really bothering baby. Fast flow is something your baby can usually learn to deal with just fine, unless it is really fast or baby has some kind of latch or sucking problem.

  3. #13
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    Default Re: Burping breastfed baby

    Is it advisable to give the baby pacifier to calm her, it is very difficult to see her cry for so long
    Although, we did try to take her out on stroller which worked once , the next time she started crying later and stroller did not help

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Burping breastfed baby

    Generally it is suggested to avoid pacifiers for the first 6 weeks or if there are breastfeeding problems.

    But, if you understand the problems with pacifiers and are careful to avoid them, I think a pacifier can be used safely in any situation.

    The problem with pacifiers is that just like bottles, they are a breast replacement. But unlike bottles (or the breasts) they provide no nourishment.

    So pacifier overuse is linked to poor weight gain. Baby is given the pacifier too often/too long and this prevents baby nursing enough. Also, baby not nursing enough causes a problem with milk production.

    Another problem when pacifier interferes with normal nursing frequency is when mom is over producing, she gets more full between sessions and baby has an even stronger flow to deal with than if they nursed more often.

    It is also possible that using a pacifier will interfere with baby learning to properly latch. But if baby is latching fine at this point and you do not overuse the pacifier, I think this is unlikely to be a problem.

    So basically you want to be sure pacifiers are NOT in any way limiting how often or how long a newborn nurses. It is normal for a newborn to nurse 12 or more times a day, to cluster nurse, to want to nurse a long time sometimes and a shorter time others, etc. So it can be hard to know if pacifier use is interfering with "normal frequency."

    So basically I would suggest use pacifier sparingly, only when either it is not possible to nurse, or you are offering to nurse and baby will not nurse, and you know baby has nursed plenty that day already.

    Also sometimes, a fussy baby who will not nurse can be comforted with the pacifier to the point they will nurse. That is a good use of a pacifier.

    Just be aware not all babies will take a pacifier. None of mine ever did. But I found my own clean pinky or knuckle made an excellent pacifier.
    Last edited by @llli*maddieb; April 24th, 2017 at 09:08 PM.

  5. #15
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    Default Re: Burping breastfed baby

    I have tried block feeding for quite sometime now. Still the other breast seems to become full and eventually leads to fast flow which baby is finding difficult to swallow/take. She does spit up sometimes still (i know now that is normal and not freaked out much by that) and she seems to be adjusting her throat and making grunting noises after feeding. It looks like she has taken much of an effort by nursing (which I assume is normal for all babies)
    Should i try offering alternate breasts in each feeding?

  6. #16
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    Default Re: Burping breastfed baby

    I have tried block feeding for quite sometime now.
    Block feeding is a technique for reducing milk production, NOT for reducing fast flow. It means keeping baby on one side for two or more feedings, so that the "blocked" (not nursed from) breast can become very full and that tells the body to reduce production. Is this what you have been doing?

    Of course, if milk production is reduced, flow will probably eventually reduce as well- but since block feeding is so effective at reducing milk production, it is usually only appropriate when a baby is gaining very quickly and mom and baby are having fairly serious breastfeeding problems due to overproduction. (such as mom becoming painfully engorged, baby refusing to nurse) Also block feeding usually corrects problematic OP within about a week. Longer term block feeding may reduce milk production too much. Also, unless OP is very severe, it is usually suggested to avoid block feeding for at least the first 6 weeks.

    I am not sure how you are block feeding, or what you mean by "some time." If you are taking short "blocks" then you may not be seeing effects from it. However, even those short blocks could actually be increasing milk flow, because the longer milk sits in the breasts, the faster the flow.

    I would suggest using the other techniques suggested for fast flow (positioning changes, frequent nursing, nursing one side at a time if that is what baby prefers, taking baby off when flow is too fast and re-latching when the flow slows) and avoid block feeding for now. So yes I see no reason to not try having baby alternate sides from one feeding to the next.

    If you are asking if baby should take both sides per feeding, I think you can try that too if you want. There is certainly not anything wrong with baby nursing both sides each feeding. Having baby nurse one side per feeding often helps with a fast flow issue, mostly because when mom insists baby take both sides each time, (many moms are told to do this in the hospital or by someone) this increases milk production, often too much. Usually, at all times it is best to follow baby's lead- if baby wants both sides, then that is fine. If baby prefers one side at a time, assuming normal weight gain, that is fine as well. Most babies nurse both sides sometimes and one side sometimes, and it changes over time as well. As milk production naturally reduces, many baby start preferring to nurse both sides at a time.

    If you continue to have a feeding issue that is worrying you, I would suggest seeing a lactation consultant. There may be something up with baby's sucking and swallowing pattern or latch if baby continues to have issues with milk flow.

    Here is more info on block feeding: http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/artic...dos-donts.html
    Last edited by @llli*maddieb; May 1st, 2017 at 08:38 AM.

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Burping breastfed baby

    As suggested I would avoid block feeding.
    I usually nurse only one side at a time/the baby takes only one side at a time. She still nurses for only about 10 minues, 15 minutes maximum on only one side per feeding. She is 6 weeks old. During the day I nurse every 2 hours or sometimes the gap is 3 hours if she is asleep. During the night it is about every 3-4 hours. On an average its about 9-10 sessions in 24 hours.
    I have read that hindmilk is the milk that comes after foremilk. If i alternate sides for each nursing session, is it possible that the baby will not get the hindmilk. (Since if I change sides at each feeding, she will only get the foremilk. My understanding may be wrong on this!)

  8. #18
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    Default Re: Burping breastfed baby

    Alternating sides will not result in not enough hindmilk. In fact, since baby will then (presumably) nurse on one side longer, rather than both sides but for shorter on each, they would theoretically get more hindmilk nursing one side at a time. But concern over not enough hindmilk is not the reason to nurse one sided. One sided nursing often helps if mom is making so much milk the flow is too fast for baby. Nursing one sided may help with other things, but not to get baby more fat. This is important to understand because sometimes mothers will nurse one sided so baby gets more hindmilk because baby is not gaining well. This is the last thing a mom with a slowly gaining baby wants to do, because in that case baby needs more milk overall, not more hindmilk. And they are more likely to get more milk overall if they nurse both sides each feeding.

    There is lots of misunderstanding/misinformation about foremilk and hindmilk, so it is very confusing.

    What some limited studies have indicated is that when a baby nurses, the milk starts out higher in lactose (milk sugar) and lower in fat. There is still fat, just not as much as later.
    Gradually, over the course of the nursing session, the milk changes to the point where at the end of the feeing, there is more fat and less lactose.
    As far as I know, these studies have been done by measuring fat and lactose in pumped milk. I do not see how else it could be done. So right away, there is a problem as babies remove milk from the breast differently than a pump does. Also, a mother who is measuring this can keep pumping until she gets to visibly fattier milk. In fact, she could keep pumping until there the breast is basically empty. Babies do not do this. They nurse until they have had enough! So comparing the foremilk and hindmilk of a pumping session may not have much at all to do with what happens when a baby nurses. But, because of these limited studies, lactation experts have concluded that milk changes something like this during the course of a nursing session.

    What is getting lost is that this is normal. Milk starts out higher in lactose and gradually becomes fattier for a reason. Experts can only theorize about the reasons, and they think it is because lactose (milk sugar) gives baby lots of energy to move, grow, and to keep nursing, and regulates their electrolytes and quenches thirst so they need it early on each feeding so they are sure to have those vital needs met every time they nurse even if they nurse for a short time. For some reason, people have started assuming that this means that babies who nurse for a few less minutes than others are somehow not getting enough fat! This is simply not true. Normal, healthy babies know what they need, and will nurse as long as they need to. A baby who is nursing for less time is still getting fat and calories in what they drink. If a baby is not gaining normally, they need more milk, not more hindmilk.
    Also no studies have indicated that a baby needs to nurse a certain amount of time to get "enough hindmilk." We know individual babies and mothers are physiologically different enough from other mothers and babies that this probably varies nursing pair to nursing pair.

    On an average its about 9-10 sessions in 24 hours.
    This is probably fine but you can always encourage baby to nurse more often to see if it helps with any breastfeeding issues. Even if you have to wake baby sometimes.

  9. #19

    Default Re: Burping breastfed baby

    Nursing frequency is average 10 times in 24 hours. Baby's birth weight was 7 lbs 6 oz.

  10. #20
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    Apr 2017
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    Default Re: Burping breastfed baby

    It seems to me that the fast flow/oversupply issue has gotten corrected to an extent. I am alternating sides at every feeding and dont feel full these days. Day time feedings are 2/2.5 hrs apart and late night time is 3/3.5 hrs apart.
    My baby gags at the breast sometimes, even before latching on/beginning to nurse. She also gags while asleep and sometimes spits up as a result or sometimes nothing comes out. Is that normal, it is scary to see.

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