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Thread: Hi! Have some questions

  1. #1

    Default Hi! Have some questions

    Hi everyone,
    I'm currently 37w3d pregnant with 3rd child. I ebf the other 2 for 6 months each then continued to bf until a year and a half and two and a half. I was not working at the time. This time I may be returning to work when baby is 4 months old (if I can't put it off til 6 months) and I know NOTHING about pumping, bottles, storage, anything but boob to mouth.. please offer any help you can think of. I'm even somewhat worried about bf with two older kids and so much going on. And about nipple issues or anything else after not doing it in like 3-4 years!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    10,163

    Default Re: Hi! Have some questions

    Hi Congrats! I would suggest do not worry about pumping or bottles for at least a couple months after baby is born. There is no reason to worry about it right away since you have at least until four months. By far the best thing to do for having success with pumping and bottles is to get breastfeeding off to the best start possible, so concentrating on that for a while may be the best course of action.

    What specifically is worrying you about breastfeeding this time around? Did you have any issues before?

  3. #3

    Default Re: Hi! Have some questions

    I didn't have any problems with my other 2 except mastitis at a few months old with my second. But it was gone quickly. I'm just worried about not being able to focus on it bc of my older kids and also worried about the pumping bc Idk anything at all about it nor do I have a pump or the $300 to get one

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    10,163

    Default Re: Hi! Have some questions

    nor do I have a pump or the $300 to get one
    Are you in the US? Do you have health insurance of any kind?

    not being able to focus on it bc of my older kids
    Well, it would probably help to line up help with your kids for at least the first few weeks in case there are any breastfeeding issues that need addressing, and even if there are not, the first 2-6 weeks are so difficult with a newborn no matter whether you are nursing or not it can certainly be hard to care for young kids or cart around older ones in that newborn period. You do not say how old the olders are or if they have some special requirements or what your concerns are there, so it is hard to make suggestions. In my experience with having a baby and olders, you just figure it out, just as you did when you had second baby.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Hi! Have some questions

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*maddieb View Post
    Are you in the US? Do you have health insurance of any kind?

    Well, it would probably help to line up help with your kids for at least the first few weeks in case there are any breastfeeding issues that need addressing, and even if there are not, the first 2-6 weeks are so difficult with a newborn no matter whether you are nursing or not it can certainly be hard to care for young kids or cart around older ones in that newborn period. You do not say how old the olders are or if they have some special requirements or what your concerns are there, so it is hard to make suggestions. In my experience with having a baby and olders, you just figure it out, just as you did when you had second baby.

    The older ones are 8 and almost 6. And I have the pregnancy medicaid but no actual insurance unfortunately. My husband could've gotten an hsa but no actual insurance so we passed on it at enrollment time. I did find out my leave will be up at pretty much exactly 4 months pp so idk how often he'll be eating then and everything, so overwhelming

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    10,163

    Default Re: Hi! Have some questions

    Ok so 8 and 6 is old enough to help you. Mine were 6 and 9 (both boys) when their little sister was born. I could trust the 9 year old to hold baby safely when I needed but it was the 6 year old wanted to help the most with diapers and everything. And yes, while I am sure you do not have these problems, I found out one can break up a sibling brawl or catch a racing 6 year old while holding a nursing baby if need be.

    I am not sure what pregnancy Medicaid is or why you would not qualify for regular Medicaid, but never mind that for now. The ACA requires insurers to provide pumps and I am not aware that Medicaid is not included in this requirement, but it may well vary state to state. So I would suggest ask your doctor or someone how you would go about getting a pump through Medicaid. This website may help, but you will probably find better info from your state: https://www.healthcare.gov/coverage/...ding-benefits/

    If that is a dead end, try WIC. In fact you might want to go to WIC first. If you are on Medicaid then you and your baby certainly would qualify for WIC, it provides supplemental food vouchers for pregnant and nursing women and children up to age 5. It is not the same as food stamps, it is easier to qualify for WIC.

    What is important to know is that WIC's mission includes helping moms breastfeed. WIC's philosophy on infant feeding has turned completely around from the days they simply dispensed formula vouchers for babies. Every WIC office is different in what they can provide but it is worth looking into it. You may find they not only have a way for you to get a pump but also can offer professional or peer to peer breastfeeding assistance if need be. So I urge you to find out what is available at your local WIC.

    If that is also a dead end, contact your local breastfeeding coalition or La Leche League and ask for help getting a pump. If you are in a place where it is very hard for lower income moms to get government financial help acquiring a pump, it may be that local breastfeeding advocates are helping with some type of program.

    If you know how long you will be at work, then you will be able to estimate how much your baby would need each day. The general rule of thumb is between 1 and 1.5 ounces per hour of separation. So if you will be away from baby for 10 hours total each day, you will want to have between 10 and 15 oz. of expressed milk available for your caregiver. Bottles can be in increments of 2-3 ounces to help avoid waste (also no need to discard a bottle of breastmilk that has been drunk from as you would a bottle of formula.)

    To put that in perspective, if you waited to start pumping until your baby was 2 months old, and then pumped once every other day and got 2 ounces each time you pumped, by 4 months you would have 60 ounces, or 4 times the maximum you would need for each day. In other words, you probably would not need to start pumping right away to easily have enough milk. So you probably have time to get confident nursing again before worrying about pumping.

    Of course I am assuming you will be able to pump about every 3 to 4 hours while AT work as well. If this is possibly not going to be possible, let us know because that is a different problem.
    Last edited by @llli*maddieb; April 13th, 2017 at 07:13 PM.

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