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Thread: TORN.

  1. #1

    Question TORN.

    I have been breastfeeding for 11 months. I work outside my house as well as pump at work. I work for the state so my employer has been amazing about me having to pump. I definitely can keep up with my work as well. I am also currently making enough at work pumping 4 times a day for my daughter to be fed all day!! Thank GOD!
    I have a bit of a dilemma. I am coming up on a year and from what I've read, I am not covered after a year to pump at work. I do not want to stop breastfeeding and I don't mind supplementing with cow's milk, if my daughter will take it. So I guess my question is has anyone ever pumped at work past a year? Could I keep it a secret from my boss and just try to work it in a couple times a day vs 4 times a day now?? Is cow's milk really ok for babies?? Is there milk that is better? Organic? Skim? 2%?
    I haven't spoke to my daughters doctor, but I have spoke with a lactation consultant and she wants me to pump, basically all day, and save up my milk for after a year. I'm sure if any of you have been there, yall know, it's not easy to pump/breastfeed all day. I appreciate everyone's responses and support.

    p.s. my daughter is eating solids, however, she doesn't really like baby food.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Default Re: TORN.

    Are you sure your work is going to give you a hard time about continuing to pump? If your employer has been amazing about you pumping so far, I would not assume they will not be after your baby is a year old. Yes it is true some of the laws do not protect pumping past one year. But the fact is none of these laws actually has an enforcement provision, and also moms were arranging with their employers pumping in the workplace long before there were any laws about it.

    Lots of people pump past a year. There is not some magical switch that makes it "ok" to no longer pump after this point. Many moms no longer want to pump after a year, and so they wean themselves off the pump sometime after a year and only nurse. But this is going to have some impact on milk production and also, of course, means baby will not get your milk anymore during the work day. Most people think this is OK because the AAP says babies should nurse to 1 year. But in fact what the AAP actually says is baby should nurse until at least one year. And the world health organization says at least 2 years.

    If a mom is done pumping, that is one thing. Pumping is really hard for many moms and making it to a year is an amazing milestone. But if mom is not yet ready to stop pumping, why should she? There is no reason.

    If you are pumping 4 times a day at this point, you are most likely not going to be able to stop pumping cold turkey anyway. Doing so might leave you uncomfortable or even ill. It is always safer to slowly wean yourself off the pump. If your employer says anything about it, you can explain you are in the process of weaning off the need to pump. Weaning could entail pumping fewer times a day and or pumping less milk each time, and it is very individual how long it takes. I see no reason why it could not take you many months, or even a longer to safely wean off pumping at work. After all it all depends on how your body works and not what the law says.

    but I have spoke with a lactation consultant and she wants me to pump, basically all day, and save up my milk for after a year.
    Well this is a nice idea for providing milk for your child after a year, but in practice makes little sense and could even be dangerous, as pumping like mad now would act to increase your milk production, and then if you stop pumping cold turkey, you are at a higher risk of having issues with engorgement , plugs or mastitis than you would otherwise. Was this an IBCLC or a LLL Leader or what that suggested this?
    You can talk to your doctor about what is safe for baby to have after a year, but they may not know anything about breastfeeding and pumping just FYI.

    p.s. my daughter is eating solids, however, she doesn't really like baby food.
    Smart baby
    Last edited by @llli*maddieb; March 24th, 2017 at 08:44 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    24,794

    Default Re: TORN.

    with the PP. This would be a great time to talk to your employer. You might want to give your post-1-year pumping plans a kind of soft sell- perhaps "I have been working on reducing my number of pump sessions but the process is taking more time than I thought, so is it possible to find continued pump breaks in my schedule?" They don't need to know how hard you're working on reducing your pump sessions!

    You could certainly take the route of keeping this a secret, but if you don't have to... Plenty of people do pump at work after a year, though the number is probably pretty small.

    Is cow's milk really ok for babies?? Is there milk that is better? Organic? Skim? 2%?
    Whether or not cow's milk is okay for babies- and for humans in general- is a matter of debate. You run into issues like "Is it ethical to consume cow's milk, given what the beef/dairy industry does to the planet?" and "Is the nutrition found in cow's milk really better than that derived from plants?" and "What animal milk is closest to human milk?" I think what we can all agree on is that humans, being omnivores and very flexible in their diets- are generally just fine consuming cow's milk. If you do give your baby cow's milk, you should give her a whole milk product, because she does need fat in her diet and animal milk is often a very important source of the necessary nutrients. In addition, you do not need to give her milk per se; yogurt or cheese are good alternatives. Organic/non-organic is another matter of debate, as is the difference between milk from cows treated with rBST and those who are not. One thing you absolutely want to avoid is raw milk, as it can be contaminated with bacteria which are dangerous for human health. (Someone will probably post a pro-raw milk argument, but all I have to say to that is: listeriosis.)

    I haven't spoke to my daughters doctor, but I have spoke with a lactation consultant and she wants me to pump, basically all day, and save up my milk for after a year.
    Like MaddieB said, this seems like an onerous plan than would probably make it very difficult to stop pumping at 12 months. I wouldn't do it.

    p.s. my daughter is eating solids, however, she doesn't really like baby food.
    Baby food is gross. A lot of kids prefer to go right to finger foods and skip the purée/spoon stage. Also, I know you didn't ask this question, but when it comes to amount, a lot of kids don't eat a ton of solids until they are well over a year of age.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: TORN.

    Also a lot women pump wean at a year or right after and their supply doesn't suffer and they just continue to breastfeed while together. Without supplementing with cow's milk. I went back to work at the 14 month point after being home full time up until that point. There was no where to pump. And while my breasts were very very full I didn't lose my supply. We continued to nurse on demand while together and he wasn't interested in cow's milk. So he drank water while away from me and solids. He was an avid eater by the year point and I didn't need to supplement with cow's milk and I didn't lose my supply. He did eat cheese and would dip stuff in yogurt. So some dairy. But no milk.

    Way too lazy for formula

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